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textures

A look at Adobe Capture’s latest updates for photographers
Adobe recently added a couple of features to its Adobe Capture app. If you’re not familiar with this Adobe app...
Using creative textures with still life photography
Where does blurring the line between straight photography and digital art happen? Is it in the styling, the shoot or...
Five tips for adding textures to your photos
The term “texture” is a catch-all term for adding either abstract images, detailed photos, or patterns of different surfaces, like...
How to Enhance Your Photos With Textures – Part 2: Blending
When using textures to enhance your photos in Photoshop, blending is how you reveal your image below the texture layer...
How to Enhance Your Photos With Textures – Part 1: Adding Textures
In photography a texture image or “texturing” is used to enhance or accent some part of the image in your...
How to Transform Your Photos With Texture Layers in Luminar 2018 Part 2
For this composite, my goal was to produce a version of my galloping wild horses image that looks like it’s...
How to Transform Your Photos With Texture Layers in Luminar 2018 Part 1
In the digital darkroom, we can take two paths with our images. The first is to use your photo processing...

Five tips for adding textures to your photos

The term “texture” is a catch-all term for adding either abstract images, detailed photos, or patterns of different surfaces, like metal, cracked paint, sand, etc. as an overlay on your image. This is a type of “compositing”, combining multiple images into one finished work. Adding textures to your images can change the mood, create special effects, strengthen the composition, or help better tell a story.  These five concepts will help you add textures more easily, realistically, and quickly in Adobe Photoshop

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How to Enhance Your Photos With Textures – Part 1: Adding Textures

In photography a texture image or “texturing” is used to enhance or accent some part of the image in your digital darkroom.  Although they can help you create eye-catching works of art, textures also can be very easy to overdo. In this article I’ll explain my process for adding textures to my photography, using Adobe Stock and Photoshop,  to create more impact, transform the mood of the image, or improve on the composition.

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Part 2 How to Transform Your Photos With Texture Layers in Luminar 2018

How to Transform Your Photos With Texture Layers in Luminar 2018 Part 2

For this composite, my goal was to produce a version of my galloping wild horses image that looks like it’s been drawn and woodburned onto an old board. Not sure why, I just thought it would look cool, the inspiration behind many my composites. Having an idea of what you want to make before you start usually produces the best results. But, don’t be so in love with your idea you can’t change as you create your composite.

At this point, I have my horse picture processed and saved as a high resolution TIF file, and have found a nice wood texture I want to use as the background texture. Ideally you want these texture files to be high-resolution also, so that you can print your finished piece later. Using a 400 pixel wide texture will result in a blurry grainy mess, it’s too small to print it big later.

Read More
Part 2 How to Transform Your Photos With Texture Layers in Luminar 2018

How to Transform Your Photos With Texture Layers in Luminar 2018 Part 1

In the digital darkroom, we can take two paths with our images. The first is to use your photo processing software to get your image looking as close to what you saw when you took it. This is your standard digital darkroom workflow, adjusting your exposure, getting rid of spots, cropping, etc., with more of a focus on realism.

The second path is to take that photo and transform it into something completely different. It may be combined with other photos as a composite, have various effects applied, and generally will look completely different from what you started with, but in a good way! Here the focus is on creating something new, using your original image only as the first ingredient. This is compositing, combining multiple images and effects to produce an original piece of art. In this article I’ll take you down the second path, introducing how to use Skylum’s new Luminar 2018 to start doing your own composites.  

Read More

How to Enhance Your Photos With Textures – Part 1: Adding Textures

In photography a texture image or “texturing” is used to enhance or accent some part of the image in your digital darkroom.  Although they can help you create eye-catching works of art, textures also can be very easy to overdo. In this article I’ll explain my process for adding textures to my photography, using Adobe Stock and Photoshop,  to create more impact, transform the mood of the image, or improve on the composition.

Read More
Part 2 How to Transform Your Photos With Texture Layers in Luminar 2018

How to Transform Your Photos With Texture Layers in Luminar 2018 Part 2

For this composite, my goal was to produce a version of my galloping wild horses image that looks like it’s been drawn and woodburned onto an old board. Not sure why, I just thought it would look cool, the inspiration behind many my composites. Having an idea of what you want to make before you start usually produces the best results. But, don’t be so in love with your idea you can’t change as you create your composite.

At this point, I have my horse picture processed and saved as a high resolution TIF file, and have found a nice wood texture I want to use as the background texture. Ideally you want these texture files to be high-resolution also, so that you can print your finished piece later. Using a 400 pixel wide texture will result in a blurry grainy mess, it’s too small to print it big later.

Read More
Part 2 How to Transform Your Photos With Texture Layers in Luminar 2018

How to Transform Your Photos With Texture Layers in Luminar 2018 Part 1

In the digital darkroom, we can take two paths with our images. The first is to use your photo processing software to get your image looking as close to what you saw when you took it. This is your standard digital darkroom workflow, adjusting your exposure, getting rid of spots, cropping, etc., with more of a focus on realism.

The second path is to take that photo and transform it into something completely different. It may be combined with other photos as a composite, have various effects applied, and generally will look completely different from what you started with, but in a good way! Here the focus is on creating something new, using your original image only as the first ingredient. This is compositing, combining multiple images and effects to produce an original piece of art. In this article I’ll take you down the second path, introducing how to use Skylum’s new Luminar 2018 to start doing your own composites.  

Read More

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It’s our birthday, and we want to celebrate with you! Check out our 21st birthday contest and enter to win a new camera, Drobo 8D, X-Rite calibration tools, Xpozer prints, Skylum software and more!

Plus, by entering you’re automatically eligible to win one of our monthly prizes. This month we’re giving away an educational bundle, with. courses from Joel Grimes and Serge Ramelli. You’ll also get a free one-year membership to ThinkTAP Learn!