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animals

Lockdown lunacy: Dogs in action
Practice wildlife photography by heading to the zoo
Seeing differently at the zoo
Tamron Recipes with Molly Dombroski: Pet photography
Beware the drop bear
Frightening encounters: Meeting animals in the dark
The Sunday Shutter: January 5, 2020
Working with reptiles and small critters
Photography tips for zoos, wildlife sanctuaries and rescues
Get started with animal photography in the wild
Give your pets a photo makeover with these tips from Adobe
Quick Tip: Have patience when working with animals

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Tamron Recipes with Molly Dombroski: Pet photography

Welcome to another episode of the Tamron Recipes podcast, brought to you by Tamron USA and SkipCohenUniversity.com. In the show, Skip Cohen and I are passionate about highlighting photographic artists as our creative chefs and discussing their favorite photographs. Just like your

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Julie Powell - drop bear (1 of 1)

Beware the drop bear

Living in Australia, we seemed to have hit the jackpot when it comes to weird, wacky and dangerous animals. It seems everything is out to kill you. Sharks, snakes, spiders, crocodiles … we have some of the deadliest critters in

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sundayshutter-010519

The Sunday Shutter: January 5, 2020

In this week’s edition of The Sunday Shutter, we highlight photographs from Australia’s wildfires and show you how to build a digital camera with a DIY image sensor. Then we showcase a photographer who photographs rarely viewed animals, and finally,

Read More
Julie Powell_frog Header

Working with reptiles and small critters

I recently did a photoshoot with some reptiles and small critters. All were Australian animals, but I am pretty sure most reptiles are similar around the world. I have done this several times and it is always a lot of

Read More
wild-animals-featured

Get started with animal photography in the wild

(Editor’s Note: We’d like to welcome this guest post from Matt Fey of PrintingCenterUSA. Matt writes for PrintingCenterUSA’s blog and social channels. In his free time, he enjoys taking photos while out and about in the backcountry of Montana. Whether

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potd-19-new.jpg

We want to see your pet photographs!

In July, Photofocus made some changes to our Photographer of the Day feature. In addition to our regular architecture, beauty, outdoor and street categories, we added a “flex” category that changes every month. In July, we highlighted architectural images, and

Read More
featured-jhahn-platypod-camera-trap-part2

Get Ready to Remote, Part 2: Advanced Camera Traps

There are places that can be too difficult to stay with a camera and shoot, there are events that are too dangerous to be around when they occur, and there are animals that are too shy of humans to ever get near to photograph. This is when photographers turn to using Photo or Camera Traps, a way to capture these types of images or video from a distance by remote control.  

In part 1 of this series, I covered the fundamentals of creating a simple remote camera trap. Now that you have that skill in your proverbial photography toolbox, let’s talk about more advanced setups and how to use the Platypod to support multi-light nighttime photo traps and remote video capture.

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featured-jhahn-platypod-camera-trap

Get Ready to Remote, Part 1: Simple Camera Traps For Wildlife

Go out into the great outdoors. Find a place that animals like to hang out when people aren’t around. Set up your camera to automatically a photo of them when they do show up. Leave it there. Come back tomorrow and see if you got any shots. Repeat it all over again until you get the shots you need. Welcome to Remote Camera Traps!

In previous articles I’ve shared the different ways I’ve used Platypods in my photography. Possibly one of the best uses I have found is in helping set up a successful remote camera trap. The Platypod adds flexibility to the placement of your camera and lighting equipment that can make your trapping endeavors much more likely to pay off with great images.

Read More
sundayshutter-010519

The Sunday Shutter: January 5, 2020

In this week’s edition of The Sunday Shutter, we highlight photographs from Australia’s wildfires and show you how to build a digital camera with a DIY image sensor. Then we showcase a photographer who photographs rarely viewed animals, and finally,

Read More
Julie Powell_frog Header

Working with reptiles and small critters

I recently did a photoshoot with some reptiles and small critters. All were Australian animals, but I am pretty sure most reptiles are similar around the world. I have done this several times and it is always a lot of

Read More
wild-animals-featured

Get started with animal photography in the wild

(Editor’s Note: We’d like to welcome this guest post from Matt Fey of PrintingCenterUSA. Matt writes for PrintingCenterUSA’s blog and social channels. In his free time, he enjoys taking photos while out and about in the backcountry of Montana. Whether

Read More
potd-19-new.jpg

We want to see your pet photographs!

In July, Photofocus made some changes to our Photographer of the Day feature. In addition to our regular architecture, beauty, outdoor and street categories, we added a “flex” category that changes every month. In July, we highlighted architectural images, and

Read More
featured-jhahn-platypod-camera-trap-part2

Get Ready to Remote, Part 2: Advanced Camera Traps

There are places that can be too difficult to stay with a camera and shoot, there are events that are too dangerous to be around when they occur, and there are animals that are too shy of humans to ever get near to photograph. This is when photographers turn to using Photo or Camera Traps, a way to capture these types of images or video from a distance by remote control.  

In part 1 of this series, I covered the fundamentals of creating a simple remote camera trap. Now that you have that skill in your proverbial photography toolbox, let’s talk about more advanced setups and how to use the Platypod to support multi-light nighttime photo traps and remote video capture.

Read More
featured-jhahn-platypod-camera-trap

Get Ready to Remote, Part 1: Simple Camera Traps For Wildlife

Go out into the great outdoors. Find a place that animals like to hang out when people aren’t around. Set up your camera to automatically a photo of them when they do show up. Leave it there. Come back tomorrow and see if you got any shots. Repeat it all over again until you get the shots you need. Welcome to Remote Camera Traps!

In previous articles I’ve shared the different ways I’ve used Platypods in my photography. Possibly one of the best uses I have found is in helping set up a successful remote camera trap. The Platypod adds flexibility to the placement of your camera and lighting equipment that can make your trapping endeavors much more likely to pay off with great images.

Read More

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