Portrait Retouch Tutorial with ACDSee Ultimate 10

Editor’s Note: For Window’s users looking for an all-in-one digital asset manager, RAW photo editor with layers, ACDSee Ultimate 10 offers a solution.  We invite you to check out a free trial of their application

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Pbyqx93Ymc&feature=youtu.be

In this tutorial you’ll learn strategies to retouch portraits for a natural look.  The software used is ACDSee Ultimate, be sure to give the trial a test for Windows or the beta for Mac.

How to Make Wildlife Photos Look Great with ACDSee Ultimate

With wildlife, moments are fleeting and there are, literally, once-in-a-lifetime photo opportunities. While it is ideal to “get it right in the camera”, I also believe that while we create photos in the camera, we finish them in the digital darkroom. Some moments we capture are worth a little extra work to rescue if a mistake is made in settings or the light wasn’t quite right at the time.

In this article I’ll take you through how I process my wildlife images in the Develop Mode within ACDSee Ultimate 10 to get them looking their best, or to rescue shots that need a little extra help.

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Layers, Dehaze, and Light EQ Tutorial with ACDSee Ultimate 10

Editor’s Note: For Window’s users looking for an all-in-one digital asset manager, RAW photo editor with layers, ACDSee Ultimate 10 offers a solution.  We invite you to check out a free trial of their application.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgA40QITw8E&feature=youtu.be

In this video we’re going to fix an underexposed photo, illustrate how to create a composition image in edit mode using layers, and apply a dehaze effect to foggy image.

Selective Coloring Tutorial with ACDSee Ultimate 10

Editor’s Note: For Window’s users looking for an all-in-one digital asset manager, RAW photo editor with layers, ACDSee Ultimate 10 offers a solution.  We invite you to check out a free trial of their application

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyhFiN2M66I&feature=youtu.be

 

In this Ultimate 10 tutorial, we’ll learn an easy way to create a popular selective coloring effect, converting a photo to black and white while leaving the main subject in full color.

8 Tips for Better Candid Photos

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Adam Price from ACD Systems. They are the makers of ACDSee Ultimate 10 for Windows.

Some of the best photos are candid. People are more relaxed and photos have more context. Despite what you might think, candid photos do take some planning. Here are a few tips to get you started:

1. Take Your Camera Everywhere

First and foremost, if you want to capture spontaneous shots, you have to always be ready with your camera. It may feel weird bringing your camera with you everywhere, and your friends may be a little uneasy. But after a few times your friends will think nothing of it when you bring your camera out, and that’s when you can get the best shots.

2. Lose the Flash

The biggest giveaway that you’re taking photos is your flash. If you want to remain unnoticed, turn off your flash, decrease your f-stop, and increase your ISO. This should also create a shallow depth of field, giving more focus to the subject.

3. Use a Zoom Lens

Shooting with a telephoto or zoom lens helps you to keep a good distance from your subjects, making it so that they don’t even realise you’re there. You’ll capture shots as if you are right next to them. Telephoto lenses can create an intimate scene; they focus on the subjects and not the scenery.

4. Shoot from the Hip

Another great way to go unnoticed is to shoot from the hip. It gives you a different perspective and a real candid feel to the shot. The great thing about using a digital camera is it doesn’t matter if you don’t get the shot the first time; you can take as many as you want. You may want to use a wider angle lens while doing this, making it easier to aim.

5. Catch People in the Moment

Catching people in the moment tends to be more interesting than capturing someone doing absolutely nothing. It adds context and an element of story and feeling to the image. It can take time to capture a shot when the person is distracted and completely focused on what they are doing or who they are with. Whether it’s someone intently reading a book or a parent and child, there’s a story behind each photo.

6. Keep Moving / Change perspective

When you’re taking candid photos the last thing you want to do is ask your subjects to move so you can get a better angle. That would defeat the whole purpose of getting a candid shot. Instead, you’re the one who has to move to get the angle you want. Do whatever you need to do – crouch down, get up high, take shots on an angle, zoom in, or take a wide.

7. Frame Image with Foreground Elements

Framing your shot with foreground elements not only outlines the shot nicely and adds context, but also furthers the relaxed and candid feel of the photo. You create the illusion of hiding from the subjects and catching a glimpse of a scene. You can try using the frame of a doorway or looking over a person’s shoulder or foliage (if outdoors) to create this look.

8. Use a Continuous Shooting Mode

A scene or facial expressions can change in the blink of an eye. By using continuous shooting mode or shooing in bursts, you increase your chance of getting that perfect shot, as well as some amusing shots along the way.

Editor’s Note: For Window’s users looking for an all-in-one digital asset manager, RAW photo editor with layers, ACDSee Ultimate 10 offers a solution.  We invite you to check out a free trial of their application

An Intro to ACDSee – Edit Mode

Editor’s Note: For Window’s users looking for an all-in-one digital asset manager, RAW photo editor with layers, ACDSee Ultimate 10 offers a solution.  We invite you to check out a free trial of their application

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFzb9etoqx8

Welcome to Edit mode in ACDSee Ultimate 10. In this video you’ll learn about the UI, how to navigate through edit mode, a variety of adjustment tools, layers, pixel targeting, and so much more.

Dual Exposure Tutorial with ACDSee Ultimate 10

Editor’s Note: For Window’s users looking for an all-in-one digital asset manager, RAW photo editor with layers, ACDSee Ultimate 10 offers a solution.  We invite you to check out a free trial of their application.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-4h_W517a4&feature=youtu.be

In this video, we’ll show you how to get a dual exposure look using ACDSee Ultimate 10.

Dual exposure is a unique effect that photographers use to blend two images together. They often are composed of a subject and a background or landscape.

An Intro To ACDSee – Ultimate 10

Editor’s Note: For Window’s users looking for an all-in-one digital asset manager, RAW photo editor with layers, ACDSee Ultimate 10 offers a solution.  We invite you to check out a free trial of their application.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abJsSCrebMs&feature=youtu.be

In this tutorial we’re going to take you on a brief tour that will outline each mode, and the features they offer. If you don’t know anything about ACDSee, or ACDSee Ultimate 10, this is where to start.