lisa robinson

A New Kind of Acrylic: TruLife

Recently, my friend and fellow Photofocus author, Levi Sim, called me up and asked me about how I print my photos for my clients. We discussed the options I have

Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Early Stages of Color

Since the beginning, everyone wanted color photographs. Images being black and white only was a chief complaint about photography. Initially, there were a few “successes”; Sir John Herschel was able

Luminar 2018: My First Impressions

Macphun (Skylum Software) just dropped their latest version of their editing tool, Luminar 2018 and I decided to check it out. I’m not typically one to edit my work with

Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: The Snapshot

The introduction of the Kodak camera and it’s ensuing popularity started an entirely new school of thought in photography; the snapshot. Previously, “snapshot” was used by hunters as a term

Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Industrialization

In the late 1800’s the world was beginning to take shape into something more of what it looks like today. Industrialization was coming to cities and taking them, literally, to

Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Mobile Studios

As long as photography remained chained to any sort of wet plate process, photographers found themselves encumbered by massive hardships in order to “take the show on the road”. However,

Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Henry Peach Robinson

Last time, we talked about how Rejlander pushed the envelope with the conventional view of photography as art (thus far). There was another, slightly younger, contemporary of Rejlander’s named Henry

Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Oscar Rejlander

The battle for photography’s place in the fine art world is a road that is long and seemingly never ending at times, even today. In the 1800’s especially, photography struggled

The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

History of Photography: Is Photography Art?

Is photography art? This seemingly simple question is anything but. Since the earliest days of photography, critics and photographers themselves have questioned if it’s purely a mechanical, commercial process or

The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

History of Photography: Photos as Propaganda

As photography evolved, one theme remained fairly constant in the public’s opinion: seeing is believing. People generally regarded photographic prints as evidence of truth and reality. Steadily becoming more mobile,

Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Muybridge and Marey

Between the 1850’s and 1880’s two men, Eadweard Muybridge and Etienne-Jules Marey both were using photography to further the study of locomotion (or movement) of humans and animals. However, they

Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Stereoscopic Photography

Stereostopic photography is yet another blip in the history of photography where the photograph was still working to find its’ true identity. It’s based on binocular vision, which is the

The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

Ambrotypes and Tintypes

In my last History of Photography article, I talked about the wet plate, or collodion process and how it was quickly adopted as the status quo in the industry. Like

The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

Rise of The Wet Plate Process

After Talbot introduced the calotype (see my previous article here), the world was in search of something photographic in between the calotype’s unique paper characteristics and the daguerreotype’s pristine, crystal