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Photofocus Episode 92

Host: Scott Bourne (www.scottbourne.com
or www.twitter.com/scottbourne) and Joe Farace (www.joefarace.com or www.twitter.com/joefarace)

Show notes by Bruce Clarke (www.momentsindigital.com
or www.twitter.com/bruceclarke)

Welcome to Episode Number 92 of Photofocus with Scott Bourne and special guest Joe Farace. Photofocus is the show devoted to your questions about anything
photography related including gear, technique, locations, etc. Your questions
will shape the direction of this show so be sure to send your questions to [email protected]. We will try to answer as many as we can but we
get a lot of questions so we’ll try to take a collection of questions that
represent a particular topic and present them together.

Sponsor – Adorama

Adorama is more than just a camera store. Visit Adorama.com to shop for a variety of other electronic items.

This week we kick things off with a question about exposure compensation:

Question One – Exposure Compensation

When I set exposure compensation (on my Nikon D7000) what actually gets adjusted? Shutter speed? Aperture? ISO? I mean something has to give, right? David Rabenau from Webster Groves, MO.

Joe: It will vary depending upon what mode your camera is in. If you are in Av mode – the shutter speed will vary. If you are in Tv or Shutter Priority – then your Aperture will change. As far as ISO, many cameras have an auto ISOs feature but I find they often pick to high of an ISO.

Scott: Make sure you read your manual and it will do a good job of explaining the settings on your particular camera. Auto ISO can work well with fast moving subjects where the lighting might change very quickly. Many of the high end cameras allow you to set an ISO range.

Question Two
– Shooting in High Humidity Locations

What should I be concerned about when shooting in high humidity locations? I have a canon 5d Mark II. Kevin Banning Newburgh, Indiana

Joe: I would bag the camera. The change in temperature can cause misting and fogging. If you put it inside a sealed plastic bag and allow it to acclimate you should be fine.

Scott: You want to keep the condensation off the camera so if you put it in a bag then it forms on the bag and not on the camera. You don’t want condensation to get into the lens or it can create mold and that will ruin the lens. Check your manual for operating conditions for your camera.

Question Three – Shooting Sports with an ND Filter

I was shooting a high school football game recently in the middle of the afternoon. The opposing team, wearing all white, has a tendency to have their uniforms largely turn out as blown highlights with not a lot of detail even on a slightly overcast day. I was wondering whether it’s normal practice for professional sports shooters to use a neutral density filter to allow them to use a small f stop for short depth of field and blurry backgrounds, but also slow the shutter speed to not blow out the highlights in the uniforms? Scot from Cedarville OH

Scott: The way to avoid blown out hilites is to get the proper exposure. Sometimes we have more latitude in the scene than the camera can handle so adding an ND filter will just make the overall scene darker – it won’t reduce the range between the shadows and hilites. I’ve never seen any pro sports shooters use an ND filter. Understand that photography is always about compromise and the religion about blown-out hilites drives me crazy. If the exposure on the face is good, then I don’t care if the jerseys are blown out. If you shoot in RAW you might have more latitude in your shot.

Joe: He didn’t mention if he is using flash. If he is using flash, some fabrics might fluoresce.

Sponsor – Animoto

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Make sure you don’t miss a single Photofocus post – point your feed reader to the free Photofocus RSS Feed here and subscribe. PLEASE BE PATIENT – OUR SERVERS SEE LARGE LOADS ON PUBLISHING DAYS. THE DOWNLOADS MAY GO SLOWLY BUT THEY WILL FINISH. Feed URL: http://bit.ly/ffwv9n Download episode… Photofocus Episode 91 Host: Scott Bourne (www.scottbourne.com or http://www.twitter.com/scottbourne) […]

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Make sure you don’t miss a single Photofocus post – point your feed reader to the free Photofocus RSS Feed here and subscribe. PLEASE BE PATIENT – OUR SERVERS SEE LARGE LOADS ON PUBLISHING DAYS. THE DOWNLOADS MAY GO SLOWLY BUT THEY WILL FINISH. Feed URL: http://bit.ly/ffwv9n Direct Download: http://photofocus.podomatic.com/enclosure/2011-09-04T19_15_49-07_00.mp3 Photofocus Episode 86 Host: Scott […]

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PLEASE BE PATIENT – OUR SERVERS SEE LARGE LOADS ON PUBLISHING DAYS. THE DOWNLOADS MAY GO SLOWLY BUT THEY WILL FINISH.

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Direct Download: http://photofocus.podomatic.com/enclosure/2011-08-24T16_48_30-07_00.mp3

Photofocus Episode 85

NOTE: We had a sync problem caused somehow in the editing and conversion process in the original airing of the show. We fixed that and re-uploaded the show so if you want to avoid hearing the  poorly synced version please re-download the show. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Host: Scott Bourne (www.scottbourne.com or www.twitter.com/scottbourne) and Joseph Linaschke (www.apertureexpert.com or www.twitter.com/travel_junkie)

Show notes by Bruce Clarke (www.momentsindigital.com or www.twitter.com/bruceclarke)

Welcome to Episode Number 85 of Photofocus with Scott Bourne and special guest Joseph Linaschke. Photofocus is the show devoted to your questions about anything photography related including gear, technique, locations, etc. Your questions will shape the direction of this show so be sure to send your questions to [email protected]. We will try to answer as many as we can but we get a lot of questions so we’ll try to take a collection of questions that represent a particular topic and present them together.

This week we kick things off with a question about using your camera in extreme heat:

Continue reading

PLEASE BE PATIENT – OUR SERVERS SEE LARGE LOADS ON PUBLISHING DAYS. THE DOWNLOADS MAY GO SLOWLY BUT THEY WILL FINISH.

Feed URL: http://bit.ly/ffwv9n

Direct Download: http://photofocus.podomatic.com/enclosure/2011-08-05T08_00_03-07_00.mp3

Photofocus Episode 83

Host: Scott Bourne (www.scottbourne.com or www.twitter.com/scottbourne).

Show notes by Bruce Clarke (www.momentsindigital.com or www.twitter.com/bruceclarke)

Welcome to Episode Number 83 of Photofocus with Scott Bourne. Photofocus is the show devoted to your questions about anything photography related including gear, technique, locations, etc. Your questions will shape the direction of this show so be sure to send your questions to [email protected]. We will try to answer as many as we can but we get a lot of questions so we’ll try to take a collection of questions that represent a particular topic and present them together.

Question One – Shooting vs. Selling

John Ellington from NY writes: I’d like to know what percentage of your time you spend selling and what percent you spend shooting? I’ve heard that to be successful you have to spend more time selling than you do shooting.

Scott: You are correct. You do spend more time selling than you do shooting. I have to spend everyday on the phone doing the smile and dial. I’ve been at it for awhile so it’s easier than it used to be but ultimately it’s your job to sell your photography. Expect about 80% of the time selling and 20% of your time shooting. Continue reading

PLEASE BE PATIENT – OUR SERVERS SEE LARGE LOADS ON PUBLISHING DAYS. THE DOWNLOADS MAY GO SLOWLY BUT THEY WILL FINISH. Feed URL: http://bit.ly/ffwv9n Direct Download: http://photofocus.podomatic.com/enclosure/2011-07-24T15_13_05-07_00.mp3 Photofocus Episode 82 Host: Scott Bourne (www.scottbourne.com or http://www.twitter.com/scottbourne). Show notes by Bruce Clarke (www.momentsindigital.com or http://www.twitter.com/bruceclarke) Welcome to Episode Number 82 of Photofocus with Scott Bourne. Photofocus […]

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PLEASE BE PATIENT – OUR SERVERS SEE LARGE LOADS ON PUBLISHING DAYS. THE DOWNLOADS MAY GO SLOWLY BUT THEY WILL FINISH.

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Photofocus Episode 81

Host: Scott Bourne (www.scottbourne.com or www.twitter.com/scottbourne) and special guest Tamara Lackey (www.tamaralackeyblog.com or www.twitter.com/tamaralackey)

Show notes by Bruce Clarke (www.momentsindigital.com or www.twitter.com/bruceclarke)

Welcome to Episode Number 81 of Photofocus with Scott Bourne and special guest Tamara Lackey. Photofocus is the show devoted to your questions about anything photography related including gear, technique, locations, etc. Your questions will shape the direction of this show so be sure to send your questions to [email protected]. We will try to answer as many as we can but we get a lot of questions so we’ll try to take a collection of questions that represent a particular topic and present them together.

This week we kick things off with a question about the best aperture for portraits:

Question One – Best Aperture for Portraits

Debbie Hume from Long Island, NY asks: I know this is very basic but I’ve struggled with knowing which aperture is best for general portrait photography. How much depth of field do I really need?

Tamara: There is no one perfect aperture for portraits. It depends on the look you want to go for. Shooting wide open is very popular these days to blur the background and separate your subject from the background. It will also depend upon how far you are away from your subject, the lens length, the distance they are from the background.

Scott: It depends but typically the style today is to shoot a bit more wide open. Continue reading