post-processing

You photographed fireworks – now what?

We all love to get out to try and capture the spectacle of fireworks during the Fourth of July holiday. Sometimes we do better than others. And, sometimes we’ve done

Saturation vs. vibrance

(Editor’s note: This is a guest article by Jeremy Chan, a Master Photographer/artist who is based in San Francisco, CA. Jeremy’s passion about fine art and creative has helped him

Discovering Luminar’s workspace

(Editor’s note: Aurora HDR 2019 is now available. Create amazing HDR photographs with Skylum’s Aurora HDR 2019. Purchase today and save plus get a free bundle of training, LUTs and Looks too!)

Quick Tip: Reset Lightroom Classic sliders

Sure, there’s a big “Reset” button in Lightroom Classic, putting your edited photo back to its original state. But what if you need to reset just some of the adjustments

Quick Tip: Saturation vs. Vibrance

There are two sliders in Lightroom and most other post-processors that can be handy for adjusting the intensity of your colors. Think of saturation like ISO, but for color —

Tips and Tricks for Using Layers

What is a Layer? Layers are a powerful way to “build up” your images. They allow you to add filters–or stack several filters together–to apply corrections or enhancements. Changing blending

Photography Marketing: Developing a Style

I’ve written in the past about why you should have a photographic specialty. Simply put, you want to be known for being an expert in that particular type of photography.

How to Finish Your Wild Animal Photos With Tone Mapping

Funny thing about animals is they move around, a lot. So a technique like HDR, which requires several images that are nearly identical in everything but exposure values, is usually not an option for wildlife photographers. Often thought of as mainly a tool for landscape and architecture photography, High Dynamic Range photography captures a series of shots at multiple exposures to provide detail in both highlights and shadows a camera cannot capture in one frame. But, in the case of a running horse or flying bird, even at high shutter speeds and frame rates there will be large differences in their position from frame to frame. This makes multiple exposure HDR pretty impractical, if not nearly impossible, for wildlife and other action photography.

While the multi-shot HDR technique may not work well for high-speed creatures, software like Aurora HDR is a useful tool to put the finishing touches on your wildlife photos. Instead of capturing a series of shots at multiple exposures as you would for landscapes, you use a single shot in a process called “tone mapping”. This is a fast and easy way I use Aurora HDR to Tone Map a single image and add some extra pop and punch to wild animal images.

How to Remove Noise with a Luminosity Layer in Aurora HDR 2018

HDR (High Dynamic Range) processing of your photos by its nature can result in a lot of noise or graininess in your final image. While Macphun’s new Aurora HDR 2018 for PC’s does a great job overall reducing noise, there are still times when noisy areas appear in your processed HDR. This can be caused by many reasons, but most commonly it’s due to your settings in camera (such as shooting at too high of an ISO) or any image processing you have done to your images before merging them in Aurora (such as exposure adjustments). Regardless of the cause, you can remove most of this noise by using a “Luminosity Layer”. This technique saves a lot of time, giving you consistently good-looking results, quickly.