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History of Photography: Henry Peach Robinson
Last time, we talked about how Rejlander pushed the envelope with the conventional view of photography as art (thus far)....
History of Photography: Oscar Rejlander
The battle for photography's place in the fine art world is a road that is long and seemingly never ending...
History of Photography: Is Photography Art?
Is photography art? This seemingly simple question is anything but. Since the earliest days of photography, critics and photographers themselves...
History of Photography: Brady, Gardner, and The Civil War
It's odd to think of war as a way for photographers to hone their skills. In the Spring of 1861...
History of Photography: Photos as Propaganda
As photography evolved, one theme remained fairly constant in the public's opinion: seeing is believing. People generally regarded photographic prints...
History of Photography: Muybridge and Marey
Between the 1850's and 1880's two men, Eadweard Muybridge and Etienne-Jules Marey both were using photography to further the study...
History of Photography: Stereoscopic Photography
Stereostopic photography is yet another blip in the history of photography where the photograph was still working to find its'...
Ambrotypes and Tintypes
In my last History of Photography article, I talked about the wet plate, or collodion process and how it was...
Rise of The Wet Plate Process
After Talbot introduced the calotype (see my previous article here), the world was in search of something photographic in between...
The Calotype: An Overview
In my last history of photography article, I talked about William Henry Fox Talbot, the inventor of the Calotype. Here,...
William Henry Fox Talbot: An Overview
William Henry Fox Talbot was an English scientist and scholar in the early 1800’s. Although he was a contemporary of...
The Daguerreotype
As is often the case with history, it seems that time moves slowly until it explodes in a flurry of...
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Henry Peach Robinson

Last time, we talked about how Rejlander pushed the envelope with the conventional view of photography as art (thus far). There was another, slightly younger, contemporary of Rejlander’s named Henry Peach Robinson to whom we also owe credit to for

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Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Oscar Rejlander

The battle for photography’s place in the fine art world is a road that is long and seemingly never ending at times, even today. In the 1800’s especially, photography struggled for a place at the table and one man, in

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The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

History of Photography: Is Photography Art?

Is photography art? This seemingly simple question is anything but. Since the earliest days of photography, critics and photographers themselves have questioned if it’s purely a mechanical, commercial process or one that is intrinsically woven as another thread into the

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

History of Photography: Photos as Propaganda

As photography evolved, one theme remained fairly constant in the public’s opinion: seeing is believing. People generally regarded photographic prints as evidence of truth and reality. Steadily becoming more mobile, photographers tended to photograph scenes of current events wide, because

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Muybridge and Marey

Between the 1850’s and 1880’s two men, Eadweard Muybridge and Etienne-Jules Marey both were using photography to further the study of locomotion (or movement) of humans and animals. However, they both had different approaches and motives. The Running Horse Muybridge

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Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Stereoscopic Photography

Stereostopic photography is yet another blip in the history of photography where the photograph was still working to find its’ true identity. It’s based on binocular vision, which is the action of the brain associating two slightly different images (each

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

Ambrotypes and Tintypes

In my last History of Photography article, I talked about the wet plate, or collodion process and how it was quickly adopted as the status quo in the industry. Like many things that are popular, offshoots are invented by people

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

Rise of The Wet Plate Process

After Talbot introduced the calotype (see my previous article here), the world was in search of something photographic in between the calotype’s unique paper characteristics and the daguerreotype’s pristine, crystal clear detail. In the 1840’s photographers began making the move

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

The Calotype: An Overview

In my last history of photography article, I talked about William Henry Fox Talbot, the inventor of the Calotype. Here, I want to explore how the calotype evolved within photography and how it evolved the photographic world. In the 1840’s,

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

William Henry Fox Talbot: An Overview

William Henry Fox Talbot was an English scientist and scholar in the early 1800’s. Although he was a contemporary of Daguerre, his contributions to photography were independent of what was going on with Daguerre and in mainland Europe. In 1834,

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

The Daguerreotype

As is often the case with history, it seems that time moves slowly until it explodes in a flurry of invention and then seemingly all at once everything changes. To me, this feels especially true in photography. In my previous

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

History of Photography: Photos as Propaganda

As photography evolved, one theme remained fairly constant in the public’s opinion: seeing is believing. People generally regarded photographic prints as evidence of truth and reality. Steadily becoming more mobile, photographers tended to photograph scenes of current events wide, because

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Muybridge and Marey

Between the 1850’s and 1880’s two men, Eadweard Muybridge and Etienne-Jules Marey both were using photography to further the study of locomotion (or movement) of humans and animals. However, they both had different approaches and motives. The Running Horse Muybridge

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Stereoscopic Photography

Stereostopic photography is yet another blip in the history of photography where the photograph was still working to find its’ true identity. It’s based on binocular vision, which is the action of the brain associating two slightly different images (each

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

Ambrotypes and Tintypes

In my last History of Photography article, I talked about the wet plate, or collodion process and how it was quickly adopted as the status quo in the industry. Like many things that are popular, offshoots are invented by people

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

Rise of The Wet Plate Process

After Talbot introduced the calotype (see my previous article here), the world was in search of something photographic in between the calotype’s unique paper characteristics and the daguerreotype’s pristine, crystal clear detail. In the 1840’s photographers began making the move

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

The Calotype: An Overview

In my last history of photography article, I talked about William Henry Fox Talbot, the inventor of the Calotype. Here, I want to explore how the calotype evolved within photography and how it evolved the photographic world. In the 1840’s,

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

William Henry Fox Talbot: An Overview

William Henry Fox Talbot was an English scientist and scholar in the early 1800’s. Although he was a contemporary of Daguerre, his contributions to photography were independent of what was going on with Daguerre and in mainland Europe. In 1834,

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

The Daguerreotype

As is often the case with history, it seems that time moves slowly until it explodes in a flurry of invention and then seemingly all at once everything changes. To me, this feels especially true in photography. In my previous

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

The Beginning & Camera Obscura

The history of photography is vast and fascinating. It didn’t develop like other art forms and comparatively, photography is in its’ infancy. Looking at where our craft came from is a great way to find new appreciation and inspiration for

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Drobo migration from Drobo to Drobo5D

Since I’ve gotten a Drobo, I have to say, I really enjoy it. It’s nice having a user friendly RAID array of drives not just for the capacity they provide, but for the data protection they provide. In case you’re

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Enter to win a new camera, an education bundle, plus much more!

It’s our birthday, and we want to celebrate with you! Check out our 21st birthday contest and enter to win a new camera, Drobo 8D, X-Rite calibration tools, Xpozer prints, Skylum software and more!

Plus, by entering you’re automatically eligible to win one of our monthly prizes. This month we’re giving away an educational bundle, with. courses from Joel Grimes and Serge Ramelli. You’ll also get a free one-year membership to ThinkTAP Learn!