Hyperlapse

I love my GoPro cameras. One is a constant companion in my backpack. A few years ago, I had an idea to shoot a behind-the-scenes time lapse of my near constant travel (e.g. coming/going to the airport, planes taking off/landing). I put fifteen or so videos in the can but soon gave up on the […]

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So there’s maybe more bungles that people would make if they didn’t know any better or were just starting off. I figured that there could be some extra help in identifying some of the more recent blunders that have been popping up more often in communities that I’m associated with. Before you read this, make […]

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As you read this, think back to when you were beginning photography…  I’m sure you’d be able to relate to this to yourself (or your friend) and hopefully laugh (and not cry). Alright, so this list may not be super accurate and is in no particular order, but, I think it is safe to say […]

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bsuskyboxafter

Have you ever been working away in photoshop, keyboard short-cutting like no other, when suddenly you do something that is unexpected and awesome?  It happened to me when working on a image of the French Quarter in New Orleans.  This technique is one of the best kept secrets in Photoshop and it has changed the […]

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_______ This Post Sponsored by: Viewbug – Fun Photo Contests Kelby Training – Use code KTSBA12 to save $20 BorrowLenses.com – Renting Canon, Nikon, Olympus & Sony, bodies, lenses, etc. SmugMug – Professional Photo Sharing Digital SLR Store – Cameras, lenses, accessories and everything else.

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As some of you may know, I am a big fan of pre-visualizing your shots. If you can see it in your mind’s eye before you capture the image, you have a better chance of making a significant photograph. I’ve written about this a bit with my Cranes in the Fire Mist shot. I pre-visualized […]

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There are so many post-processing tools for digital photographers today that it’s easy to get seduced into thinking that this filter or that plug-in will solve all of our problems. In some cases, those filters and plug-ins can be a huge help. But there are a few tips and tricks I use to get the […]

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Post by Andrew Darlow – Follow Andrew on Twitter Above: An overview (left) and close-up section (right) of the same image showing a typical zoom level when reviewing and dusting images. The zoomed-in area is outlined in white. If you’ve ever scanned your own prints, negatives, or slides (or had a lab scan them without […]

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Over Processed Properly Processed All Photos Copyright Scott Bourne 2005 – All Rights Reserved Capturing the image is only part one these days. Post-processing is part two. And while many photographers put the time in to learn how to capture the image, fewer learn what to do next. Here are the five biggest photo-processing mistakes […]

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By Nicole Young – Follow Nicole on Twitter Do you have a photograph that needs some post-processing help, but are not sure where to start or what to do? Let us help! We are starting a new series of videos called “Fix My Photo” – viewers (that’s you!) submit images with a short explanation of […]

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Image and Post by Rick Sammon I need to send this file to one of my publishers. The top four photographs, taken near Mt. Rainier Washington with my Canon G10, illustrate (clockwise from top left): front lighting, side lighting, back lighting (little color in the sky), and back lighting with a slight Curves adjustment. The […]

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If your digital photographs are noisy, meaning they look like they have the digital equivalent of grain, consider trying Nik Software DFine 2.0. Dfine is a plug-in that works with Photoshop. It costs less than $99 and it’s very easy to use. I suggest that you use this plug-in first before you make any other […]

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If you shoot digitally or you scan, at some point you’ll need to learn how to properly sharpen your images. It’s important to understand WHY you need to sharpen digital images. Any digital capture process will introduce some softness or blurring to your images. The sharpening that you do in your photo software is designed to replace the original sharpness that you lose during capture and nothing more. Software sharpening should NOT be used on a photo that is out of focus. If a shot is out of focus, it is out of focus–period. No amount of work in something like Photoshop will magically make the image appear to be in focus.

Let me say it one more time. If your images are out of focus to begin with, don’t expect Photoshop, Aperture, or anything else to fix them.

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