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history of photography

Steve Glynn’s tintype portrait project
History of Photography: The Stieglitz Group
History of Photography: The Photo-Secession Movement
History of Photography: What is Pictorialism?
History of Photography: Early Stages of Color
History of Photography: Advances in Technology for Negatives
History of Photography: The Snapshot
History of Photography: Introduction of Kodak
History of Photography: Industrialization
History of Photography: Mobile Studios
History of Photography: Julia Margaret Cameron
History of Photography: Henry Peach Robinson

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Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: What is Pictorialism?

In the late 1800’s photography was still basically like a baby giraffe learning how to get up and walk for the first time. Photography didn’t really know what it was, processes were still being invented and refined and there was

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Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Early Stages of Color

Since the beginning, everyone wanted color photographs. Images being black and white only was a chief complaint about photography. Initially, there were a few “successes”; Sir John Herschel was able to record blue, green and red on paper coated with

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Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: The Snapshot

The introduction of the Kodak camera and it’s ensuing popularity started an entirely new school of thought in photography; the snapshot. Previously, “snapshot” was used by hunters as a term that meant to shoot instinctively without taking aim. Soon the

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Introduction of Kodak

In the early life of photography, cameras (and all the gear that came with them) were large, heavy, and cumbersome. The wet plate processes, the only one available, required the photographer (or an assistant) to do the development. This added

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Industrialization

In the late 1800’s the world was beginning to take shape into something more of what it looks like today. Industrialization was coming to cities and taking them, literally, to the next level. Ships were being built larger and larger.

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Mobile Studios

As long as photography remained chained to any sort of wet plate process, photographers found themselves encumbered by massive hardships in order to “take the show on the road”. However, as transportation networks grew, architectural technology advanced, and people began

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Henry Peach Robinson

Last time, we talked about how Rejlander pushed the envelope with the conventional view of photography as art (thus far). There was another, slightly younger, contemporary of Rejlander’s named Henry Peach Robinson to whom we also owe credit to for

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Oscar Rejlander

The battle for photography’s place in the fine art world is a road that is long and seemingly never ending at times, even today. In the 1800’s especially, photography struggled for a place at the table and one man, in

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

History of Photography: Is Photography Art?

Is photography art? This seemingly simple question is anything but. Since the earliest days of photography, critics and photographers themselves have questioned if it’s purely a mechanical, commercial process or one that is intrinsically woven as another thread into the

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: The Snapshot

The introduction of the Kodak camera and it’s ensuing popularity started an entirely new school of thought in photography; the snapshot. Previously, “snapshot” was used by hunters as a term that meant to shoot instinctively without taking aim. Soon the

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Introduction of Kodak

In the early life of photography, cameras (and all the gear that came with them) were large, heavy, and cumbersome. The wet plate processes, the only one available, required the photographer (or an assistant) to do the development. This added

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Industrialization

In the late 1800’s the world was beginning to take shape into something more of what it looks like today. Industrialization was coming to cities and taking them, literally, to the next level. Ships were being built larger and larger.

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Mobile Studios

As long as photography remained chained to any sort of wet plate process, photographers found themselves encumbered by massive hardships in order to “take the show on the road”. However, as transportation networks grew, architectural technology advanced, and people began

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Henry Peach Robinson

Last time, we talked about how Rejlander pushed the envelope with the conventional view of photography as art (thus far). There was another, slightly younger, contemporary of Rejlander’s named Henry Peach Robinson to whom we also owe credit to for

Read More
Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Oscar Rejlander

The battle for photography’s place in the fine art world is a road that is long and seemingly never ending at times, even today. In the 1800’s especially, photography struggled for a place at the table and one man, in

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

History of Photography: Is Photography Art?

Is photography art? This seemingly simple question is anything but. Since the earliest days of photography, critics and photographers themselves have questioned if it’s purely a mechanical, commercial process or one that is intrinsically woven as another thread into the

Read More
The history of photography Civil War Photographs Brady and Gardner

History of Photography: Photos as Propaganda

As photography evolved, one theme remained fairly constant in the public’s opinion: seeing is believing. People generally regarded photographic prints as evidence of truth and reality. Steadily becoming more mobile, photographers tended to photograph scenes of current events wide, because

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Lisa Robinson's weekly History of Photography Column

History of Photography: Muybridge and Marey

Between the 1850’s and 1880’s two men, Eadweard Muybridge and Etienne-Jules Marey both were using photography to further the study of locomotion (or movement) of humans and animals. However, they both had different approaches and motives. The Running Horse Muybridge

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