It’s time for some oldies but goodies. If you’re new to our site, you might have missed some of these gems. Here are some of our top-rated posts. 15 Criteria For Evaluating Camera Lenses How to Select Photo Paper Ten Tips for Photographing Wildlife Here’s Why People Really Engage in Brand Wars _______________ This post […]

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Back when Photofocus was TWIPPHOTO, We had lots of posts that our new readers might have missed, so here’s a list of some retro stuff – call em’ oldies but goodies. Take a look and see if you missed anything? Know Your Photographer’s Rights is all about being informed. You are NOT a terrorist just […]

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Photo and post by Rick Sammon I recently received an email from a newbie digital photographer who said she really liked the cover photograph for my Digital Photography Secrets book. It’s a photograph of Marzi Gasparotti that I took during a VSP Workshop (www.vspworkshops.com) in Venice, Italy. In her e-mail, the woman went on to […]

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As I was looking at some old portfolios this week, I realized that back in the day – I kind of sucked. Don’t get me wrong, I made some good shots *including the one above* and sold lots of images. But I am shocked at how bad some of that early work was. I didn’t have a clue back then. If I’d only have known just a few of the tricks I know now, I could have been so much better. So with that in mind, I’m sharing some ideas now that I wish someone had shared with me back then.

1. Pay attention to the background. A good background can make an average picture great.

2. Know your gear backwards and forwards. The minute you finally truly understand how to use your gear, you’re freed up to start paying attention to seeing. And seeing is everything in photography.

3. Wait on the light. Really. If you think it looks good at 4PM, wait until you see it at 7PM. Waiting on the best light takes patience and provides great rewards.

4. Slow down. unless you’re a sports/wildlife photographer, chances are you can take one breath before pushing the shutter button. Take that breath and see what a difference it can make in your images. Continue reading

Back in the day when I led lots of field workshops, my students could often hear me chanting, “background, background, background.” It was my way of reminding them that the best subject in the world, placed in front of a crappy background, leads to a crappy photo. If there is one single thing that any […]

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