Copyright 2014 Doug Daulton

Where to start? “In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” Hmmm. Like New Zealand, parts of Iceland certainly feel like Middle Earth; more on that in a future post. I suppose, like Bilbo, it is best that I start at the beginning. Some months ago, my friend Geoffrey Orthwein told me he […]

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In this tutorial, we’ll be taking a look at one approach to combining HDR (High Dynamic Range) composite images in Photoshop to remove any undesired detail, and easily blend softness back into a landscape composition as needed. Questions? Drop me a line at [email protected] or look me up on Facebook and Twitter. This Post Sponsored […]

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This week’s podcast features a triple dose of photo knowledge. First up, Melissa Niu catches up with portrait photographer Tamara Lackey.  The Rich Harrington and Ron Pepper discuss panoramic photography workflows.  Then we jump back to Melissa as she interviews Jerry Ghionis for his take on shooting portraits and where the photo industry is headed. feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast Get the show […]

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We all have tons of images that could be so much more compelling if it weren’t for that blasted dull sky.  You know that giant gray nothingness that seems to suck the power right out of your masterpiece. In my view, an awesome sky can totally change the mood, feel and drama of a landscape […]

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I’ve been a fan of his for a while.  When I stare at his photographs I can almost feel the wave pounding on him as he sacrifices his body for a killer shot.  I can sense the absolute chill as he bobs in the waters of some of the most cold ocean bodies.  And I […]

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When photographing waterfalls and running water, one thing I know for sure is that I will be using an ND filter. These filters decrease the amount of light coming in through the lens and also come in different levels of “stops.” This means that a 3-stop ND filter will increase your exposure time by three stops, a 6-stop ND filter will increase by six stops, and so on. I currently have three ND filters in my inventory: a 3-stop, a 6-stop, and a 10-stop (named the Big Stopper).

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28mm, f/8, 1/20, 1/80, 1/320s, ISO 800. Do you ever get a craving to go make a picture? An urge that just won’t go away? That kind of urge is distracting, and may be hazardous to your health; you should probably take a sick day to get it taken care of. I’ll sign a note […]

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I’m getting ready to go shoot time-lapse photography, and one of the most important things I need to know is where the sun will be (closely followed by where is it going). Even if you’re just shooting sunrise and sunset its still useful to know where the sun will be coming and going.  In fact, […]

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NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE: The Photofocus Podcast Feed HAS CHANGED! Here is the new feed: feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast Download episode here…   or get it on iTunes PLEASE BE PATIENT – OUR SERVERS SEE LARGE LOADS ON PUBLISHING DAYS. THE DOWNLOADS MAY GO SLOWLY BUT THEY WILL FINISH. Rich and Scott catch up on a bunch of topics to help […]

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There are lots of things you can do to improve your landscape photography. Here are my five favorites tips. Use A Tripod It forces you to slow down and be more contemplative about your shot. The tripod also has the advantage of stabilizing the camera/lens so you can get a sharp shot. Include A Strong […]

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Copyright Scott Bourne 1996 - All Rights Reserved

Copyright Scott Bourne 1996 - All Rights Reserved

More than two million people each year make the trek to Mt. Rainier National Park. For more than one hundred years, the park has attracted climbers, hikers, naturalists and of course photographers. The Northwest’s highest mountain anchors this area which is replete with old-growth forests, flowery sub alpine meadows, and rivers born from the glaciers that streak the peak’s upper slopes.

GETTING THERE

Mt. Rainier is located about 90 miles south, southeast of Seattle. If you are flying, Sea-Tac International Airport is the closest major airport. Rent a car and head south on I-5. If you want to concentrate your visit on the park’s west side, leave I-5 near Tacoma, Wash. and follow Washington Highway 7 to Washington Highway 706. This will take you to the Nisqually Entrance. If you want to work the park’s eastern flank, take I-5 south all the way to Washington Highway 12 going east. As you drive past Packwood, Wash, take Washington Highway 123 to the park’s Stevens Canyon or White River Entrances. July through September are the park’s peak months, although portions of the park are open year-round. A one-week vehicle pass that gains the vehicle and all occupants access to the park (but not camping areas,) costs $10.00.

WHERE TO STAY

You can camp in the park or stay at one of the national park lodges on Rainier. These sites fill up quickly so visit the NPS web site link at the bottom of this story for more information.

If you want to stay in a hotel, there are several to choose from. Since I prefer starting my Rainier trips on the park’s east side, I suggest Packwood, Wash. as a base of operations. It is only 20 minutes from the park’s entrance and offers four or five small and affordable hotels. There are also some basic restaurants, gas stations and a grocery store. Hotel rooms run from $50 to $100 during peak season. Continue reading