refining

The previous Exposure Tactics post, explored understanding the difference between how Lightroom, Photoshop, and light meters measure exposure.  Now we continue to look at working with the files in postproduction. Exposure Tweaks in Lightroom & Camera Raw Calibrated computer monitors are great for displaying color and brightness. Unfortunately, the human visual system just can’t tell if […]

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A properly exposed RAW photograph offers almost unlimited creative possibility.

This Exposure Tactics post explains what a “technically proper” exposure is and how to get there. Remember I said technically proper, not creatively right. The sensors in our cameras don’t necessarily match the sensitivity of our light meter. Sad and true. This can make it difficult to judge exposure and get things right. One meter […]

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fshwlr

Editor’s Note: The following is an excerpt from a new book called the Photofocus Guide: Develop Great Images in Lightroom.  This book is almost done and we’ll be giving away free copies soon to all our readers thanks to Mosaic.  Be sure to check out the Lightroom Learning Center. There is a direct connection between the histogram and the […]

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A RAW file open in Camera Raw 8.4 shows the color values for white, middle gray and black before it is white balanced.

What comes after using an incident meter to set the exposure? Setting a neutral color balance then refining the exposure, both in post production. I always refine the exposure after neutralizing the color. Before going into the steps for either one, here’s some background on digital captures, especially RAW files. (You are shooting RAW aren’t […]

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2279-PSU Lighting Article Photographs

Exposure can be really confusing. It’s particularly so with modern digital cameras. Why? The type of light meters built into cameras is a big reason. Those meters are reflective meters. They measure the amount of light bouncing off of a subject. A reflective meter’s exposure makes what ever it sees 12.5% gray. Always. Here’s an […]

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iBooks_Header

On Monday, we told you about our two iBooks… The Basic Beginner’s Guide to Photography Light & Exposure and Secrets of HDR.  These books are truly interactive with audio, video, quizzes, and scaling images.  While many of you have already downloaded them, a many of you couldn’t as at that time they were only available for iPad. I’ll […]

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60D_6009_Edit_100922

One thing I’ve noticed about many new photographers is the enthusiasm they have for really learning how to use their camera as well as possible. In some cases, this requires the use of understanding how to shoot in Manual mode. Learning how to choose your setting so it appropriately fits the scene and style of […]

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silhouette-nicolesy

This image shows the transition of a darkened silhouette, where the image was exposed for the sky, all the way to an image where the metering was set to the foreground. We’re excited to welcome Nicole S. Young as a regular contributor. Be sure to circle her on Google +. A silhouette can make a beautiful photograph—they are a […]

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badphotogerard

Guest Post by Gerard Murphy – Follow Gerard on Twitter In this guest tutorial, take a look at how a photo can be saved using some of the recovery tools in Photoshop Lightroom.  In this real world workflow Gerard shows many techniques to organize and improve photos.  Watch as he compares multiple images using a Survey View.  He […]

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Guest Post by Rich Harrington – Follow Rich on Twitter Rich Harrington shows you how to use ACR’s Fill/Recovery Command to fix a poorly exposed photo. DISCLAIMER: This post isn’t intended to be definitive – we’re not claiming this is the ONLY way or even the BEST way to accomplish this task in Photoshop, Aperture, iPhoto or any other […]

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Post & Photo by Joe Farace – Follow Joe on Twitter If you agree that light is one of the key elements that differentiate a good photograph from a snapshot, then it’s necessary to learn and understand proper exposure. Believe it or not, there was a time when cameras did not have built in light […]

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I posted this image a few days ago and one of my readers wrote a 3,200 word expose on how I was a horrible photographer because his high school photography teacher (Yep I am being schooled by a 17-year-old) told him that under NO circumstance should you ever fail to expose for detail in the […]

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There are plenty of places to get basic exposure tips. Just enter the phrase “Basic Photo Exposure Tips” into Google and you’ll see what I mean. Since the basics are easy to come by, I decided to write a post on some advanced exposure tips. I usually recommend using your camera with matrix or evaluative […]

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This is a tough one. Many readers write and ask me, “What’s the best exposure – all things being equal.” Of course there is no “best exposure.” Every situation is different. But there are some best practices to consider. These best practices assume application toward general photography. They don’t apply to people who have a […]

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If you’re having trouble getting the right exposure, here are some basic tips that might help you solve your problems. a. Use matrix or evaluative metering. Your camera’s manual will tell you how to set this preference. It takes into account a wider area of scene information and attempts to balance the exposure to better […]

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This article is dedicated to controlling the shutter.

On older cameras, the shutter speed dial is engraved with numbers. You’d turn the dial and line up a number with a mark on the camera body. Today, you have an LCD to display the numbers, usually on the top panel of the camera and inside the viewfinder.

On the older cameras, the series of numbers went something like this 4, 2, 1, 2, 4, 8, 15, 30, 60, 125, 500, 1000. Notice that the three numbers on the left are red. I’ll get to those in a minute.

The rest of these numbers represent time in fractions of a second. Put a one over each. Two becomes ½, four becomes 1/4, 60 becomes 1/60, and so on. As the numbers on the dial get bigger, the time becomes shorter. Remember the pie analogy from school? A half (1/2) piece of pie is bigger than a quarter (1/4) of the pie.

The numbers in red represent whole seconds. Cameras with LCD readouts represent whole seconds with what looks like a quotation mark following the number. So 2” equals two seconds.

Do you notice anything special about this series of numbers? What would come after 1000 (1/1000 second)? You’re right it’s 2000. Each setting represents either twice the time or one-half the time of the setting next to it. For example, in the series 8, 15, and 30, 15 (1/15 second) is half the time of 1/8 second and twice the time of 1/30 second. This means the 1/15 second setting lets in half the light of 1/8 second and twice the light of 1/30 second.
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