NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE: The Photofocus Podcast Feed HAS CHANGED! Here is the new feed: feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast Get the show here  or get it on iTunes PLEASE BE PATIENT – OUR SERVERS SEE LARGE LOADS ON PUBLISHING DAYS. THE DOWNLOADS MAY GO SLOWLY BUT THEY WILL FINISH. Join Rich and Scott as they discuss the “Reset Concept.” […]

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Creative professionals are facing a wealth of problems when it comes to pricing. I have found that many are running  a race to the bottom.  Gear keeps getting cheaper, which is a good thing in many ways.  The problem lies in the cost barrier. Being a professional used to have a certain barrier to entry with gear, […]

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Copyright 2009 Scott Bourne - All Rights Reserved

Copyright 2009 Scott Bourne - All Rights Reserved

An Editorial By Scott Bourne

Most of my photo friends know that I am a digital dog. I like all things digital. I bought all the early (expensive) digital cameras and printers and while all that equipment is now being used as a boat anchor, I don’t regret buying any of it. I learned what I know about digital by having AITB syndrome. (Arrows In The But!) First down the path and all that.

The trials and tribulations I experienced with early digital equipment however seemed minor when compared to the outright prejudice and abuse shown to me by my fellow photographers. When I first started using digital processes, I was told (by many so-called experts) that what I was doing was not photography. When I asked what it was, no one could tell me but they just knew it wasn’t photography. The cynical side of me believes that these statements are the product of ignorance. Most of the people saying these things did not have the skill (or the money) to obtain and properly use digital equipment. Were they just jealous? Were they afraid that the new technology would pass them by? Well yes to both questions, but there is more to it than that.

Those early troubles started 15 years ago. Today, digital photography has gained worldwide acceptance. Digital cameras far outsell film cameras. Most of the photo magazines are devoted exclusively to digital photography. Many major universities now offer courses in digital photography, digital photo workshops are held nationwide by very respectable institutions and digital photography is bought and sold daily in wedding and portrait studios, at magazines, in art galleries, etc.

So now that digital photography is the norm, what ethical questions must we face as digital continues to explode onto the photo landscape? (Pun intended.) Well, very few if any in my opinion. Unless you are a photojournalist, evidence photographer, medical photographer, or scientific photographer or otherwise similarly situated, you have no ethical or moral obligation to make photographs appear “accurately.” You do have an obligation to make images, as you see them. As YOU see them. Not necessarily as they are. Continue reading