All photos Copyright Scott Bourne 2010 – All Rights Reserved Here’s a simple composition tip – try to avoid merges. Merges are places where lines intersect in such a manner as to distract and run together. Note the first photo in the post. It shows the grain silo merging with the hill behind it. This […]

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Post by Andrew Darlow – Follow Andrew on Twitter If you’ve ever had the opportunity to visit an iconic building like the US Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. or the Vatican Museum in Rome (home of the Sistine Chapel), you probably looked up and admired both the workmanship and beauty above you. That same feeling […]

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Post by Andrew Darlow – Follow Andrew on Twitter I’ve always admired beautiful frames. From heavy, gilded gold frames holding oil paintings and hanging in museums around the world, to more modern approaches, such as the refined white painted frames often seen in photo galleries and exhibitions, a frame can contribute to the overall presentation […]

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ADDITIONAL PHOTOS by Nicole Young, Rich Legg & Other iStock Contributors One of the most common problems facing new photographers – and some of us OLD photographers – is finding a great composition. Like pizza, it’s a matter of taste, but there are some fairly standard agreed-upon guidelines for a good composition. On March 20 […]

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Author: Harold Davis Publisher: Wiley Review by Conrad J. Obregon Instructing photographers about creativity is hard. It’s not like technique where there are rules, like use a large f-stop if you want to limit depth of field, or use a shutter speed equal to one over the focal length for a hand-held shot. It’s not […]

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(Photo is Copyright Nicole S. Young – All Rights Reserved) Image and Post by Nicole Young – Follow Nicole on Twitter Composition is an extremely important aspect of photography. Not only do you want your subjects to be positioned in a pleasing part within the frame (usually on a third-line) you also want to make […]

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Photographs © Rick Sammon Image and Post by Rick Sammon – Follow Rick Sammon on Twitter My buddy Scott Bourne gets a kick out of my posts that were inspired by his posts. Scott: here is another one. The Road picture Scott critiqued was cool. The first thing I saw was the “S” curved of […]

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a. Shoot a frame within a frame using minimal depth-of-field, with leaves, tree limbs or other framing devices in the foreground. b. Give your subjects plenty of room in the frame to breathe. Avoid having the subject too close to the border, which makes it feel crowded. c. Watch out for merging lines. If these […]

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Trying to decide which composition best suits a scene is something that takes an eye for detail and some practice. But to make the path a bit easier, I’ve included some basic tips. a. Know what NOT to include. Simplify, simplify, simplify. As you look at each element in the scene, ask yourself, “How does […]

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I’ve written here before about lines – specifically leading lines. But there are all kinds of lines that can help you compose a photograph more interestingly. If you’re in a photographic rut, start looking for lines. There are lines everywhere and they make great compositional elements. Look for diagonal lines, horizontal lines and vertical lines. […]

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Photos by Alex Lindsay Sometimes, composing a photo is just as much about other areas of the photo as it is the subject. If you look at these images, you will see the use of the “other elements” to compose the picture. The first, Carrletta is behind Kie…it frames the photo and puts them together. […]

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Be on the lookout for intruders trying to make their way in to your pictures. Branches, out of focus grass blades, telephone wires – all these and more can act as distractions. Most camera viewfinders show only about 92-95% of the image. Keep that in mind while photographing. You may want to try shifting your […]

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