Make sure you don’t miss a single Photofocus post – point your feed reader to the free Photofocus RSS Feed here and subscribe. Post & Photo by Joe Farace – Follow Joe on Twitter These days I don’t shoot much film but I still have a few film cameras that I don’t plan on getting […]

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Make sure you don’t miss a single Photofocus post – point your feed reader to the free Photofocus RSS Feed here and subscribe. Post & Photo by Joe Farace – Follow Joe on Twitter The difference between a portrait and a mere picture of somebody often boils down to one thing: Lighting. And one of […]

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Make sure you don’t miss a single Photofocus post – point your feed reader to the free Photofocus RSS Feed here and subscribe.

PUBLISHER’S NOTE: This post is an updated compilation of several shorter posts I wrote in the past trying to answer the question, “What camera should I buy?”

It’s still the most popular question I am asked. “What camera should I buy?” Lately there’s a new twist to the question…”Is this brand camera better than that brand camera?”

No matter how hard I try to tell people that there’s no perfect answer, they keep asking. So since I can’t convince anyone otherwise, at least know the answers to THESE questions before you ask me YOUR question.

1 ) What subject(s) will you photograph most often? Weddings, portraits, wildlife, sports, landscapes, still lifes, food, fashion, etc.
2 ) What gear (if any) do you now own?
3 ) If you had to choose between ease of use and power, which would you select?
4 ) Do you want a compact pocket-sized camera (point and shoot) or a DSLR?
5 ) On a scale of 1-10 (10 being a working pro and 1 being someone who usually shoots with a disposable camera) how would you rate your skill?
6 ) What is the MOST money you’d be willing to spend on a camera?
7 ) How long do you think you might keep the camera?
8 ) What do your friends use?
9 ) Do you have a local camera store that can offer you support?

If you have thought carefully about these questions and have the answers – you should then be closer to knowing what the perfect camera for you might be.

Hopefully, your interest in photography is strong enough that you’ll read this entire article. That will give you the best chance of making the right decision. If you’re just not that interested, scroll all the way to the bottom to see some of the popular cameras that I recommend.

For those who stuck with me:

I know that beginners especially want this question answered. They are more likely to think that it’s the camera that takes the picture, not the photographer. Unfortunately for them, that’s not the case. And there’s no secret, magic or special camera that will make you into Ansel Adams.

Let’s start with goals. What goals do you have with your photography? Photographing the kids is much easier and less expensive than photographing wildlife. Making studio portraits will require a different kind of camera than that used by sports photographers. Do you want to turn pro or just make pictures you’ll share with your immediate family? Understand this simple truth: There is no perfect camera. And not all cameras are designed for all types of photography. Many photographers have more than one camera, depending on how many photographic pursuits they are engaged in at one time.

You’ll need to take into account a wide variety of factors when selecting a camera, and the first is budget.

This post continues below….

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Make sure you don’t miss a single post – point your feed reader to the Photofocus RSS Feed here and subscribe free of charge. This is one of “those” questions we get at Photofocus every week. It’s not the kind of question I’d usually answer on the show because really, up til now, there’s no […]

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Make sure you don’t miss a single Photofocus post – point your feed reader to the free Photofocus RSS Feed here and subscribe. It’s easy to freeze motion with a camera. Usually, a shutter speed of 1/1000th of a second to 1/2000th of a second will freeze just about anything or anyone in place. But […]

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Mirrorless cameras are all the rage and Samsung has come up with a good one in the NX 100. It’s a solid replacement for any serious compact camera shooter. If you’re a G12, LX5, or P7000 kind of person, this camera is certainly something you’d look at. Likewise, it compares favorably with the Olympus E-P2 […]

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I’ve been operating this site in one form or another since 1998. In fact, we’re just seven weeks from our 13th birthday. The results of the favorite camera poll I ran this morning hasn’t changed much since then. Canon and Nikon won the lion’s share of the 1500 votes that were cast this morning. Between […]

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DISCLAIMER! You should take this post with a grain of salt. It’s mostly a mental exercise. There is no D7000 for me to test yet so this is all speculation based on nothing more than Nikon news releases, web sites and PR info. Everything could change. I am saying this in two different ways – […]

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Yesterday Nikon announced the D3100 and four new lenses. The D3100 is a game changer for those who shoot video and here’s why. 1. Price – The Nikon D3100 will be available in September for $699.95, which includes AF-S NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR image stabilized lens. That’s a LOW price for a camera with these […]

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It’s been a while since I wrote one of these posts about the camera of the future. In the past, I would approach this with a “Here’s what I want” approach. This time I’m going to take it a little differently. I am going to create a list of what I actually think we will […]

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE: This post is an updated compilation of several shorter posts I wrote in the past trying to answer the question, “What camera should I buy?”

It’s still the most popular question I am asked. “What camera should I buy?” Lately there’s a new twist to the question…”Is this brand camera better than that brand camera?”

No matter how hard I try to tell people that there’s no perfect answer, they keep asking. So since I can’t convince anyone otherwise, at least know the answers to THESE questions before you ask me YOUR question.

1 ) What subject(s) will you photograph most often? Weddings, portraits, wildlife, sports, landscapes, still lifes, food, fashion, etc.
2 ) What gear (if any) do you now own?
3 ) If you had to choose between ease of use and power, which would you select?
4 ) Do you want a compact pocket-sized camera (point and shoot) or a DSLR?
5 ) On a scale of 1-10 (10 being a working pro and 1 being someone who usually shoots with a disposable camera) how would you rate your skill?
6 ) What is the MOST money you’d be willing to spend on a camera?
7 ) How long do you think you might keep the camera?
8 ) What do your friends use?
9 ) Do you have a local camera store that can offer you support?

If you have thought carefully about these questions and have the answers – you should then be closer to knowing what the perfect camera for you might be.

Hopefully, your interest in photography is strong enough that you’ll read this entire article. That will give you the best chance of making the right decision. If you’re just not that interested, scroll all the way to the bottom to see some of the popular cameras that I recommend.

For those who stuck with me:

I know that beginners especially want this question answered. They are more likely to think that it’s the camera that takes the picture, not the photographer. Unfortunately for them, that’s not the case. And there’s no secret, magic or special camera that will make you into Ansel Adams.

Let’s start with goals. What goals do you have with your photography? Photographing the kids is much easier and less expensive than photographing wildlife. Making studio portraits will require a different kind of camera than that used by sports photographers. Do you want to turn pro or just make pictures you’ll share with your immediate family? Understand this simple truth: There is no perfect camera. And not all cameras are designed for all types of photography. Many photographers have more than one camera, depending on how many photographic pursuits they are engaged in at one time.

You’ll need to take into account a wide variety of factors when selecting a camera, and the first is budget.

This post continues below….

Continue reading

PUBLISHER’S NOTE: This post is an updated compilation of several shorter posts I wrote in the past trying to answer the question, “What camera should I buy?”

It’s still the most popular question I am asked. “What camera should I buy?” Lately there’s a new twist to the question…”Is this brand camera better than that brand camera?”

No matter how hard I try to tell people that there’s no perfect answer, they keep asking. So since I can’t convince anyone otherwise, at least know the answers to THESE questions before you ask me YOUR question.

1 ) What subject(s) will you photograph most often? Weddings, portraits, wildlife, sports, landscapes, still lifes, food, fashion, etc.
2 ) What gear (if any) do you now own?
3 ) If you had to choose between ease of use and power, which would you select?
4 ) Do you want a compact pocket-sized camera (point and shoot) or a DSLR?
5 ) On a scale of 1-10 (10 being a working pro and 1 being someone who usually shoots with a disposable camera) how would you rate your skill?
6 ) What is the MOST money you’d be willing to spend on a camera?
7 ) How long do you think you might keep the camera?
8 ) What do your friends use?
9 ) Do you have a local camera store that can offer you support?

If you have thought carefully about these questions and have the answers – you should then be closer to knowing what the perfect camera for you might be.

Hopefully, your interest in photography is strong enough that you’ll read this entire article. That will give you the best chance of making the right decision. If you’re just not that interested, scroll all the way to the bottom to see some of the popular cameras that I recommend.

For those who stuck with me:

I know that beginners especially want this question answered. They are more likely to think that it’s the camera that takes the picture, not the photographer. Unfortunately for them, that’s not the case. And there’s no secret, magic or special camera that will make you into Ansel Adams.

Let’s start with goals. What goals do you have with your photography? Photographing the kids is much easier and less expensive than photographing wildlife. Making studio portraits will require a different kind of camera than that used by sports photographers. Do you want to turn pro or just make pictures you’ll share with your immediate family? Understand this simple truth: There is no perfect camera. And not all cameras are designed for all types of photography. Many photographers have more than one camera, depending on how many photographic pursuits they are engaged in at one time.

You’ll need to take into account a wide variety of factors when selecting a camera, and the first is budget.

This post continues below….

Continue reading

I get this question often. I always answer “Yes” with some words of warning. Know who’s selling that refurb. If a well-known, established company like B&H Photo sells a refurb, (that’s not a recommendation just an example) you can trust it. If a company you’ve never heard of, particularly one located in Brooklyn, NY offers […]

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It’s still the most popular question I am asked. “What camera should I buy?” No matter how hard I try to tell people that there’s no perfect answer, they keep asking. So since I can’t convince anyone otherwise, at least know the answers to THESE questions before you ask me YOUR question. 1 ) What […]

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I am a very lucky guy. I’ve been able to shoot with almost every cool digital camera ever made. And the quality of the average digital camera has risen to unbelievable heights. To add to the good news, the cameras have not only improved dramatically, they’ve improved at breakneck speed. In five short years we’ve gone from good to great to fantastic.

But still, like all photographers, I yearn for the perfect camera. And while I love my D3 bodies, I still don’t see perfection on the horizon. With that in mind, I decided that the New Year would be a great time to let the camera companies know what’s on my wish list.

NOTE! This is not about brands. I would buy the camera I am about to describe even if Exxon made it!

1. I have fallen in love with the full-frame sensor and expect that the perfect digital camera should assume that as a baseline.
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