I am no longer using Drobos in my workflow. I’ll address the Drobo situation in a moment. First I want to talk about my new system. It’s one that I am feeling pretty good about. I have switched to the wiebeTECH system. It’s a standard RAID box that holds drives just like a Drobo does. […]

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EDITOR’S NOTE: This is a guest post by TWIP fan Ben Leal. Ben is a Microsoft employee, however he’s not part of any of the product groups mentioned in this post. Ben is a tech enthusiast, gadget freak, and photo lover fully on a PC platform.

Back up

On TWIP you talk a lot about the need to have multiple copies of files and a redundant file back up system. Microsoft produces a product called Windows Home Server targeted at the consumer market for the growing digital collection of content homes are generating. You can buy these machines prebuilt or can build one to your specific tastes and needs. The processing resources are pretty modest and people could easily convert an existing older system and run it comfortably.

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If you’re like 97% of the photographers who read this blog, you are involved in digital photography. And that means you have to consider backing up your digital photo library. You do have a backup don’t you? If not, stop reading right now and go make at least one back up and then come back to the blog.

Assuming you understand how important it is to backup your digital photos, you might have access to a backup drive you hadn’t counted on – your iPod.

That’s right, the iPod makes a wonderful backup device. If you have a large enough iPod (The new iPod Classic from Apple offers up to 160 Gigs of storage) and if you have a small enough photo library, your iPod (in a pinch) can make a wonderful emergency backup device.

Back when I photographed weddings, I carried my iPod with me and transferred images from the CF cards to my laptop and then from the laptop to the iPod. I carried the CF cards and the iPod in my pocket during the wedding and left the laptop in the trunk. That way I always had the wedding stored in at least two locations.
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If you do use CDs or DVDs to backup your photo library – please read this. After burning the disc, don’t label it. The top of the disc, NOT the bottom, is the most fragile part! Most damage comes from labeling the disc. The adhesives used in labels, and the dyes used in ink pens, […]

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I always assumed that CDs and DVDs would last forever. But research shows that is not always the case. They might deteriorate in less than three to five years. So what can you do? Remember that quality counts. Since you are going to trust these little round discs to hold your precious images, don’t skimp […]

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