museum0

I often find myself traveling… and one of my favorite stops is a good museum. All the time I see signs for no photography in museums. No tripods… no flash… no professional cameras. But cell phone cameras are just accepted.

I say, if you can’t beat them, join them. While my iPhone is no match for a true macro lens, I can still capture some fun memories of what I see.

Museum1

The left and right image are a HDR bracket set shot on an iPhone.
The image on the right was merged in camera with slight touchup on the phone.

While on a recent trip to Costa Rica, we stopped at a museum about gold (the country has a long history with the precious metal).  The museum was filled with great pieces of native art. Here was my workflow.

  1. Use an HDR photo app. As we’ve covered on an earlier post, a HDR photo has much more information than a standard camera phone one.  Plus the app will store both photos to use later.
  2. Lay the Camera down. If shooting an item in a case, I just laid the camera flat against the glass. This worked well to minimize reflections as well as stabilize the camera.
  3. Use the touchscreen. To minimize vibration and movement, I used the touchscreen button.  This means I am pushing the camera down into the glass, and not side to side with an external button.

    museum2

    Two images captured using in-phone bracketing.

  4. Post-merge. You can easily take the images shot on the phone and open them on your computer.  I find that I can merge two exposures with an app like Photomatix to get even better details in the image.

    museum2a

    While it may seem overkill, you can load bracketed photos from a phone in Photomatix on a desktop.

  5. Don’t forget post-processing. You can further enhance your photos with sharpening and noise reduction.  The camera phone will probably benefit from four adjustments: Clarity, Noise Reduction, Sharpening, and Lens Correction.

museum3

I don’t consider the smartphone a replacement for traditional gear here.  However, if my choice is get zero photos to remember my visit or get creative… I’ll choose to make a photo any way that I can.

Disclaimer: This is just one way to shoot in this situation.  You may still find yourself harassed by security guards.

______

This Post Sponsored by:

Adobe Photoshop CC and Lightroom for US$9.99/mo. This is a limited-time offer. Get it here. Be sure to also check out the Video for Photographers learning center.

The HDR Learning Center Check out new ways to use High Dynamic Range photography to make compelling images. Free tutorials and posts to get results. Produced in partnership with HDRsoft.

Mosaic A complete solution for photographers using Lightroom who want to manage and share their photos. You can easily view images with their iOS app or web service. Plus your photos are backed up to the cloud with several plans to match your needs.

lynda.com Learn photography anytime, anywhere, and at your own pace—from bite-sized tutorials to comprehensive courses. Try lynda.com free for 10 days by visiting lynda.com/ Photofocus.

500px Join the world’s premier photo community. 500px lets you discover, share, buy and sell inspiring photographs.

Drobo Not only is Drobo 5D fast, but it’s easy-to-use, expandable, flexible, and protected.

Join the conversation! 3 Comments

  1. You should try a mukushutter remote. I love mine.

    Reply
  2. So I don’t require a new laptop after all!

    Reply

Let us know your thoughts...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

About Richard Harrington

Richard Harrington is the founder of RHED Pixel, a visual communications company based in Washington, D.C. He is the Publisher of Photofocus and Creative Cloud User as well as an author on Lynda.com. Rich has authored several books including From Still to Motion, Understanding Photoshop, Professional Web Video, and Creating DSLR Video.

Category

HDR, Phoneography, Software

Tags

, ,