Okay – I’ve sort of had it. For decades, the Nikon v. Canon debate has raged. At times, other contenders’ owners have also weighed in on brand wars. Questions like, “Why don’t you guys cover my brand of camera?” occasionally extend the brand wars to include Pentax, Panasonic, Sony and others. Why Aperture over Lightroom? Etc., etc., etc.

But why? I’ve spent all these years cataloging what I think are the reasons for the brand wars, and I’ll share those below. But man this is weird to me. Photographers get very passionate about their camera brand! When you think about it, it’s downright silly. It’s a CAMERA people. It’s not a family crest.

This has only been made worse by the Internet. 20 years ago, when there were no blogs (and no anonymous blog comments made by people who are 13 feet tall as long as they’re standing behind a computer, hiding in their mom’s basement,) these discussions over the brand wars took place mostly in person. People would meet at camera clubs to defend their brands. Nobody called names mind you, because with your opponent a few feet from you, there could be consequences.

Online, where people can be as brave as they want to be because they don’t have to face their neighbor, name calling is the least of it. When I switched from Canon to Nikon earlier this year, I received death threats! Yep you read that right. Death threats – plural! I’ll pause a minute to let the absurdity of that moment sink in.

Sorry to digress but I just have to marvel at this sometimes. Back to my question . . . Why? What’s the deal? This isn’t something really important like the Iraq war or Darfur. This is photography. It’s supposed to be fun.

Well I think I know the answer. And in my usual blunt style, I am going to give my opinion on this subject with the hope – although not much hope mind you – but with the slightest amount of hope that some of the brand warriors will sit back and look at this and say, “You know what? He’s right! This is silly.”

So here it is. Brand loyalty of the extreme kind we see in photography is often motivated almost exclusively by fear.

Let me say that again. Fear or something related, is the most prevalent reason for extreme brand partisanship.

Some examples…

When I posted my review on the Panasonic LX3, folks who bought (or wanted) a Canon G10, went out and searched for negative LX3 reviews to send me. They felt compelled to show me I was wrong. “Well THAT guy says THIS about the LX3!”

When we awarded TWIPPHOTO Camera of the Year status to the D700, we received dozens of anonymous comments (which I didn’t allow through since that violates our stated policy) that said “You guys are all Nikon shooters so of course you pick the Nikon!”

Sorry, half and half folks. Alex, Aaron, Ron shoot Canon. Scott, Steve, Fred shoot Nikon. Care to try again?

When I made it known that I strongly prefer Aperture over Lightroom, again I was beset by dozens of comments from people sending me a list of well-known photographers who prefer Lightroom. As if seeing that another photographer likes something else would cause me to switch???

Fear and anxiety are at work here. People are anxious that they might have made the wrong choice! Or it could be simple insecurity that some other photographer might have a better camera or piece of software. Other fear motivators… Some people think having the wrong tool might mean they can’t make the best pictures. And let’s not forget our old friend, buyer’s remorse. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve received e-mail from someone who tells me what camera they bought only because they want me to tell them it was okay.

Breaking this down further, I have identified several aspects of brand combat that are directly tied to fear.

1. Fear of the Unknown

This one is pervasive. “What if that camera is better than mine? Will my pictures still look good?”

2. Fear of Disapproval, Failure or Rejection

“What if the people on the photowalk have a better camera than I do? Will they think I am a loser?”

3. Fear of Loss (losing what you have)

“What if my position as winner of my camera club photo contest winner is threatened because my buddy bought a better camera?”

4. Fear of Facing Reality (this one hurts)

“What happens if I buy that expensive new camera and my photos still don’t look the way I want them to?”

So you should get my point by now. MOST (not all) of the time, the camera brand wars start because people are afraid. And it’s a waste of time and energy.

There is something we can all do about this. Actually there are several things we can do.

a. Realize that it’s the photographer’s eye and craft that make a picture special. The camera is to this situation what a carpenter’s hammer is to a nail. Nothing more.
b. Realize that what kind of camera you use has nothing to do with what kind of person you are.
c. Own your own opinions. Have the self-confidence to realize that your decisions aren’t made better or worse by someone else’s decisions.
d. Don’t feed the trolls. Don’t engage in camera brand wars. Simply refuse to participate. Talk about the techniques, composition, quality of light, location or some other aspect of your images rather than your camera brand.

Yes. I do have tools I prefer over others. Yes I do currently prefer the Nikon D3 and Aperture to the Canon 1D MK III and Lightroom. But here’s the deal. In almost every situation that I encounter where there’s a photograph to be made, I could make it with the Canon or the Sony or the Pentax or the whatever. I just PREFER to make it with the Nikon. If Canon makes a camera that’s better suited for my needs, I’ll switch again. It’s no big deal. It’s just a camera – not a religion.

It’s okay to have tools you prefer. It’s not okay to bash some other photographer over the head because they have different tools they prefer.

Relax. This is photography and it’s supposed to be fun. Don’t be afraid. Go take pictures with ANY camera. Focus on the images, not the gear. You’ll be better for it.

Join the conversation! 243 Comments

  1. There’s a famous story among string players about Jascha Heifetz, unquestionably the greatest violinist to have ever – or who will ever have- lived. A fan approached him after a concert and said “Oh, Mr Heifetz, your violin sounds so beautiful!”

    So Heifetz picked the violin up to his ear, listened for a second and said “I don’t hear anything!”

  2. There’s a famous story among string players about Jascha Heifetz, unquestionably the greatest violinist to have ever – or who will ever have- lived. A fan approached him after a concert and said “Oh, Mr Heifetz, your violin sounds so beautiful!”

    So Heifetz picked the violin up to his ear, listened for a second and said “I don’t hear anything!”

  3. Get a Hasselblad and look down on everyone :)

  4. Get a Hasselblad and look down on everyone :)

  5. Great article as most have been the last few weeks!

    I’ve seen a lot of “linux vs windows” “java vs c#”, “vi vs emacs” wars as a programmer and I never understood why people defend their cause so much.
    However, as a Canon 40D owner, I felt the fear of not having the “best for me” camera in my price range when the 50D came out :)

  6. Great article as most have been the last few weeks!

    I’ve seen a lot of “linux vs windows” “java vs c#”, “vi vs emacs” wars as a programmer and I never understood why people defend their cause so much.
    However, as a Canon 40D owner, I felt the fear of not having the “best for me” camera in my price range when the 50D came out :)

  7. Well put Scott, I’ve not seen this put so well before. If peeps put as much energy into taking photographs as they do into defending the purchase decisions they would see the improvements in their work.

  8. Well put Scott, I’ve not seen this put so well before. If peeps put as much energy into taking photographs as they do into defending the purchase decisions they would see the improvements in their work.

  9. Unfortunately Scott, I think you hit the nail squarely on the head. People are afraid of having made the “wrong” choice or that someone else has something “better” than them. It seems to be human nature and unlikely to change for the better anytime soon. For as long as choices have existed people have feared they made the wrong one. Ford vs Chevy, Mac vs PC, etc. Lighten up Francis and enjoy!

  10. Unfortunately Scott, I think you hit the nail squarely on the head. People are afraid of having made the “wrong” choice or that someone else has something “better” than them. It seems to be human nature and unlikely to change for the better anytime soon. For as long as choices have existed people have feared they made the wrong one. Ford vs Chevy, Mac vs PC, etc. Lighten up Francis and enjoy!

  11. Again, I couldn’t agree with you more, Scott. I have all Canon gear. Why? Because that’s what I got as a gift 30 years ago as my first camera (an old T50, I might add, the best physical gift ever from my mom—best gift ever was love, of course *awwww*). So, for me it’s just a practical matter of always having had an investment in that camera mount.

    Everyone is coming to the table with powerful gear now, not just Nikon and Canon, so whatever you use, it’s just a tool. I feel like I could use any brand, with a short learning curve, to accomplish what I want to do artistically. That should always be the goal of the photographer, not brand loyalty.

    To me, it’s like certain types of musicians always opining that they only play X brand of instrument. Rationalization makes wonderful ammo for a bloodless war, but just remember that Hendrix could pick up ANY guitar and make it sound magical.

  12. Again, I couldn’t agree with you more, Scott. I have all Canon gear. Why? Because that’s what I got as a gift 30 years ago as my first camera (an old T50, I might add, the best physical gift ever from my mom—best gift ever was love, of course *awwww*). So, for me it’s just a practical matter of always having had an investment in that camera mount.

    Everyone is coming to the table with powerful gear now, not just Nikon and Canon, so whatever you use, it’s just a tool. I feel like I could use any brand, with a short learning curve, to accomplish what I want to do artistically. That should always be the goal of the photographer, not brand loyalty.

    To me, it’s like certain types of musicians always opining that they only play X brand of instrument. Rationalization makes wonderful ammo for a bloodless war, but just remember that Hendrix could pick up ANY guitar and make it sound magical.

  13. You’re not just dealing with a photography issue here. Humans are prone to addiction through various spectrums of emotion. Fear of course, is one of them. But this brand loyalty exists in every facet of consumerism, drug addiction, psychology – everywhere. You could probably apply this discussion to just about any bloodline of retail, not just photography. I think you’re going to run into this type of issue no matter what the subject.

    Good thoughts, but I just think it applies to more than just cameras :)

  14. You’re not just dealing with a photography issue here. Humans are prone to addiction through various spectrums of emotion. Fear of course, is one of them. But this brand loyalty exists in every facet of consumerism, drug addiction, psychology – everywhere. You could probably apply this discussion to just about any bloodline of retail, not just photography. I think you’re going to run into this type of issue no matter what the subject.

    Good thoughts, but I just think it applies to more than just cameras :)

  15. Hear Hear! The Religious Fervour of Brand Wars has to stop at some point, their just objects, things built to serve!

  16. Hear Hear! The Religious Fervour of Brand Wars has to stop at some point, their just objects, things built to serve!

  17. I’m glad you kept clear of the whole Mac versus PC debate.

  18. I’m glad you kept clear of the whole Mac versus PC debate.

  19. Great post Scott. I convinced myself for too long that the majority of people were using the best tools. I stuck by them despite the inherent problems and looked for all the evidence I could find that helped me feel right about my choice. Waited far too long to follow the advice of others. I guess readers need to ask themselves why they are reading your opinion if they don’t want to consider it.

  20. @Kent I am not sure that this applies quite as well to Mac v. PC-But yes – I didn’t want the thread hijacked by that discussion. And just to make sure nobody gets any ideas, I won’t moderate through an attempt to go there :)

  21. @Kent I am not sure that this applies quite as well to Mac v. PC-But yes – I didn’t want the thread hijacked by that discussion. And just to make sure nobody gets any ideas, I won’t moderate through an attempt to go there :)

  22. Nice to see it’s not just the computer world thats like this.

    Oddly enough, the people who work FOR the companies (eg Microsoft, or in your case, Adobe and Apple) are the least obsessive about it. Go figure.

    but yeah. It’s just a camera. It should be whats behind the view finder that matters, not who made it.

  23. Nice to see it’s not just the computer world thats like this.

    Oddly enough, the people who work FOR the companies (eg Microsoft, or in your case, Adobe and Apple) are the least obsessive about it. Go figure.

    but yeah. It’s just a camera. It should be whats behind the view finder that matters, not who made it.

  24. Nicely stated, Scott. Death threats? You really have to wonder how people live from day to day that wound up about something so relatively unimportant.

  25. This carries over and can be applied to virtually anything these days. It is like we all have a chip on our shoulder, and we always look to “know” what is better rather than “have our opinion.” To make it worse, even a “debate” can rarely be done in a civil manner since it seems that people are getting too “black and white” and it is either right or wrong and people are quick to be insulted if somebody even dares to question an opinion.

    Macintosh v Windows. Democrat v Republican, Sony v open standards, it seems that so few are willing and able to see the other side of a conversation.

  26. This carries over and can be applied to virtually anything these days. It is like we all have a chip on our shoulder, and we always look to “know” what is better rather than “have our opinion.” To make it worse, even a “debate” can rarely be done in a civil manner since it seems that people are getting too “black and white” and it is either right or wrong and people are quick to be insulted if somebody even dares to question an opinion.

    Macintosh v Windows. Democrat v Republican, Sony v open standards, it seems that so few are willing and able to see the other side of a conversation.

  27. Agree with Jason’s point. There is nothing inherently wrong with loyalty however,so long as it doesn’t manifest itself in ways which cause harm to others (eg national socialism in the 1930s) My point is that as long as we have brands (and marketeers who ram them down our throats ) we will always have tension between one group and another. The brand people create the loyalty and passion and as mere consumers you perhaps shouldn’t be surprised at how we react. (ok so maybe the death threats are a step too far but are you sure these weren’t made in jest?) Your team could be deemed guilty of creating loyalty in a similar way (I appreciate Drobo pays your way but do we need to be reminded of that fact quite so much for example) So although your point is beautifully made Scott and people do need to get a life and not get worked up about things there is a great saying my ma used to say to me years ago – “you’ve made your bed… now lie in it.”

  28. Agree with Jason’s point. There is nothing inherently wrong with loyalty however,so long as it doesn’t manifest itself in ways which cause harm to others (eg national socialism in the 1930s) My point is that as long as we have brands (and marketeers who ram them down our throats ) we will always have tension between one group and another. The brand people create the loyalty and passion and as mere consumers you perhaps shouldn’t be surprised at how we react. (ok so maybe the death threats are a step too far but are you sure these weren’t made in jest?) Your team could be deemed guilty of creating loyalty in a similar way (I appreciate Drobo pays your way but do we need to be reminded of that fact quite so much for example) So although your point is beautifully made Scott and people do need to get a life and not get worked up about things there is a great saying my ma used to say to me years ago – “you’ve made your bed… now lie in it.”

  29. Scott, excellent post. IMHO, the best I ever read on the subject. Short of a person working for either of the companies [or being subsidized], I cannot understand why people get so upset. It is only a ‘tool’ [or toy]. :-)

  30. Scott, excellent post. IMHO, the best I ever read on the subject. Short of a person working for either of the companies [or being subsidized], I cannot understand why people get so upset. It is only a ‘tool’ [or toy]. :-)

  31. Scott, very well done!!!! I agree with you whole-heartedly on EVERY count!!!! It just boils down to common sense!! Very well stated! I really appreciate how you just come to the point when you speak. It’s probably the main reason I listen to your show. I appreciate the forthrightness (wow, how did I come up with THAT word?) with which you speak. Keep up the excellent work!!!

  32. Scott, very well done!!!! I agree with you whole-heartedly on EVERY count!!!! It just boils down to common sense!! Very well stated! I really appreciate how you just come to the point when you speak. It’s probably the main reason I listen to your show. I appreciate the forthrightness (wow, how did I come up with THAT word?) with which you speak. Keep up the excellent work!!!

  33. There’s also a little confirmation bias, in that when people make an investment or decision they rationalize it and protect it. It’s practically a basic part of human nature.

    Good points, people need to remember that they’re just cameras and not sacred objects. The other brand is not the enemy, the other brand is helping you out by driving competition.

  34. There’s also a little confirmation bias, in that when people make an investment or decision they rationalize it and protect it. It’s practically a basic part of human nature.

    Good points, people need to remember that they’re just cameras and not sacred objects. The other brand is not the enemy, the other brand is helping you out by driving competition.

  35. Good article. Must be true too, because I, a Canon shooter, just bought a pair of Nikon binoculars last week and the sky hasn’t fallen on my head yet.

    One thing you didn’t mention is upgrade fever; just because a new model was released, doesn’t mean your camera stops taking good photos.

  36. Scott, good article, good points. I think that you’re right about the Internet amplifying emotion (just read any Windows versus Mac discussion – it takes less than 10 comments to descend into uninteresting drivel). It’s almost as if people feel threatened by the difference. Do I look down on Nikon owners because I have a Canon? Nope.

    Personally, I have a great motorbike, several lovely acoustic guitars and a good dSLR. Sadly, the only limitation is me, but happily the only way to get better is to learn and, happily in each case, that involves meeting interesting people…

  37. Scott, good article, good points. I think that you’re right about the Internet amplifying emotion (just read any Windows versus Mac discussion – it takes less than 10 comments to descend into uninteresting drivel). It’s almost as if people feel threatened by the difference. Do I look down on Nikon owners because I have a Canon? Nope.

    Personally, I have a great motorbike, several lovely acoustic guitars and a good dSLR. Sadly, the only limitation is me, but happily the only way to get better is to learn and, happily in each case, that involves meeting interesting people…

  38. Well said, Scott. I go through that fear every day. I’ve made images on both Nikon and Canon, and I can say that the images come out better with the special investment I like to call “time and experience”. If people want to be better photographers and have something to feel proud about, they should worry more about how much time and experience they put into their photography and not how much money and support they put into a brand of camera equipment.

  39. Well said, Scott. I go through that fear every day. I’ve made images on both Nikon and Canon, and I can say that the images come out better with the special investment I like to call “time and experience”. If people want to be better photographers and have something to feel proud about, they should worry more about how much time and experience they put into their photography and not how much money and support they put into a brand of camera equipment.

  40. Great post Scott. Fear is the culprit behind a lot of the world’s woes.

  41. Great post Scott. Fear is the culprit behind a lot of the world’s woes.

  42. Great post, and extends to all kinds of areas.

    I’ve seen great photographers get good shots with an iPhone; with a four-year 3.2 MP Sony with no external lenses; and with great gear. It’s the artist, not the brush.

    One friend I am honored to be in his photographer presence takes pictures with all kinds of things he has on hand and it’s always so good. If it can capture an image on film or a sensor, it looks good. That’s because he practices every single day, even if it’s just 10 minutes outside of the house.

    If everyone who gets into religious wars on brands spent that time practicing your photography (even if it’s on your dog) they’d forget about their camera and just enjoy the tools in your hand.

  43. Great post, and extends to all kinds of areas.

    I’ve seen great photographers get good shots with an iPhone; with a four-year 3.2 MP Sony with no external lenses; and with great gear. It’s the artist, not the brush.

    One friend I am honored to be in his photographer presence takes pictures with all kinds of things he has on hand and it’s always so good. If it can capture an image on film or a sensor, it looks good. That’s because he practices every single day, even if it’s just 10 minutes outside of the house.

    If everyone who gets into religious wars on brands spent that time practicing your photography (even if it’s on your dog) they’d forget about their camera and just enjoy the tools in your hand.

  44. Thanks for the nice post Scott. People ask my all the time what camera they should I get. While I prefer Nikon for DSLRs I like Canon for point and shoots and but I have an LX3 because it fits my needs better as a PS camera. I like the wide angle because it is close to my Nikkor 24-70 that is on my D700 most of the time.

    When switching to digital I looked at everything. I ended up with Nikon for a couple reasons.

    1. It felt better in my hand and the buttons labeled correctly. S for Shutter priority, what the heck does TV mean?

    2. Several of my family and friends had Nikon cameras. I didn’t feel the need to fit in but I did like the availability of nice lenses I could borrow while I built up my collection. :-)

    I think both of these are very important factors when looking at a camera. Does it feel good? Will you have a support system nearby if you need help or your battery runs out when shooting with friends.

  45. Hey Scott, nice post.

    We talked about this type of activity in my communication theory class last year, and I think it’s more about justifying purchases.

    When someone goes out and buys a camera, they are spending a good chunk of money, even if it’s only a few hundred dollars, that’s is quite a lot of money. When you buy a camera, you want the best you can get, so you research and look into options. Finally, you make the choice and buy a camera. When you buy the camera, you still are looking at reviews, to assure yourself it’s the right thing to buy. Then, when you hear someone else talking about a different brand, which may possibly be better (from the sounds of things) your natural instinct is to disagree, because if that camera was truly better than the one you bought, and it was about the same price, that means you made a mistake and bought the wrong camera.

    When it comes to brand names, if you hear praise for another brand, it is instinctive to disagree, because the brand you already bought must be the best, because you bought the best, and you don’t want to know that you bought something that wasn’t the best.

    Thats how I see it, anyway.

  46. Hey Scott, nice post.

    We talked about this type of activity in my communication theory class last year, and I think it’s more about justifying purchases.

    When someone goes out and buys a camera, they are spending a good chunk of money, even if it’s only a few hundred dollars, that’s is quite a lot of money. When you buy a camera, you want the best you can get, so you research and look into options. Finally, you make the choice and buy a camera. When you buy the camera, you still are looking at reviews, to assure yourself it’s the right thing to buy. Then, when you hear someone else talking about a different brand, which may possibly be better (from the sounds of things) your natural instinct is to disagree, because if that camera was truly better than the one you bought, and it was about the same price, that means you made a mistake and bought the wrong camera.

    When it comes to brand names, if you hear praise for another brand, it is instinctive to disagree, because the brand you already bought must be the best, because you bought the best, and you don’t want to know that you bought something that wasn’t the best.

    Thats how I see it, anyway.

  47. Neil Peart had a great quote about just this sort of thing: “half the world hates what half the world does every day.”

  48. Neil Peart had a great quote about just this sort of thing: “half the world hates what half the world does every day.”

  49. This is probably the top reason that I listen to the podcast and read the blog: no-nonsense commentary. I have a friend who follows the blog of a certain “expert” who loves to create controversy Rockwell and I reply that if I’m going to listen to someone about anything, I’m going to listen to people who actually make a living selling their images.

    Scott, I always appreciate your honest commentary and all the effort you and the rest of the TWIP team put into the blog and podcast. They really are wonderful resources.

    Merry Christmas and a happy and healthy 2009!

  50. This is probably the top reason that I listen to the podcast and read the blog: no-nonsense commentary. I have a friend who follows the blog of a certain “expert” who loves to create controversy Rockwell and I reply that if I’m going to listen to someone about anything, I’m going to listen to people who actually make a living selling their images.

    Scott, I always appreciate your honest commentary and all the effort you and the rest of the TWIP team put into the blog and podcast. They really are wonderful resources.

    Merry Christmas and a happy and healthy 2009!

  51. I guess I had a pretty rare experience upon purchasing my first DSLR this year. None of my friends own a DSLR, so the only outside input I got was from reading reviews of DSLRs in my price range, i.e. under $1000USD. So I went into this purchase with totally no Canon or Nikon bias (I owned an Olympus bridge camera before).

    I quickly settled on getting either a Nikon or Canon, as I wanted to go with a brand that had a large ecosystem.

    Then I made the final decision by going hands on with all the various models at my neighborhood camera shops (they are everywhere in Tokyo). I bought a Nikon D80.

    I must confess to feeling a little brand loyalty and pride now, but not enough to even think of death threats!

    I also think Mac vs. PC is a different debate, as they are much more different from each other than a Nikon or Canon camera is.

  52. I guess I had a pretty rare experience upon purchasing my first DSLR this year. None of my friends own a DSLR, so the only outside input I got was from reading reviews of DSLRs in my price range, i.e. under $1000USD. So I went into this purchase with totally no Canon or Nikon bias (I owned an Olympus bridge camera before).

    I quickly settled on getting either a Nikon or Canon, as I wanted to go with a brand that had a large ecosystem.

    Then I made the final decision by going hands on with all the various models at my neighborhood camera shops (they are everywhere in Tokyo). I bought a Nikon D80.

    I must confess to feeling a little brand loyalty and pride now, but not enough to even think of death threats!

    I also think Mac vs. PC is a different debate, as they are much more different from each other than a Nikon or Canon camera is.

  53. Personally, I choose my latest camera (Canon 30D) based on two factors: a. I was upgrading from an Elan 7 and glass is expensive. b. All of my friends shoot Canon. I had a built in support group as I was experiencing the DSLR learning curve. Choosing Aperture or Lightroom is the same. What do you friends use? Never underestimate the support you can receive from your peers, especially if you are learning together. Personally the choice of Lightroom was simple. Aperture is NOT available for a PC. As an network engineer for an Active Directory/Exchange environment using a MAC is not an option even with Parallels or Fusion installed and I don’t want to carry two laptops with me.

    Scott – Thank you for the posts and insight into your world of photography. By listening to the podcast and reading the blog I have learned more in the past year than I have in my 10 years as a photographer.

  54. Personally, I choose my latest camera (Canon 30D) based on two factors: a. I was upgrading from an Elan 7 and glass is expensive. b. All of my friends shoot Canon. I had a built in support group as I was experiencing the DSLR learning curve. Choosing Aperture or Lightroom is the same. What do you friends use? Never underestimate the support you can receive from your peers, especially if you are learning together. Personally the choice of Lightroom was simple. Aperture is NOT available for a PC. As an network engineer for an Active Directory/Exchange environment using a MAC is not an option even with Parallels or Fusion installed and I don’t want to carry two laptops with me.

    Scott – Thank you for the posts and insight into your world of photography. By listening to the podcast and reading the blog I have learned more in the past year than I have in my 10 years as a photographer.

  55. Where are the Sketch artists?? I want to hear the Sketch vs Photo arguments! The Horse vs car?! Red vs Blue!!!! In the end, an Artist never blames their tools and therefore should never compliment them either. It is true you can only do so much with each tool but once you have done all you can as often as you can with any tool then you should move on… oh but don’t try to change your spark plugs with a hammer it doesn’t work….

  56. Where are the Sketch artists?? I want to hear the Sketch vs Photo arguments! The Horse vs car?! Red vs Blue!!!! In the end, an Artist never blames their tools and therefore should never compliment them either. It is true you can only do so much with each tool but once you have done all you can as often as you can with any tool then you should move on… oh but don’t try to change your spark plugs with a hammer it doesn’t work….

  57. You won’t lose me over your post.

    I don’t know that fear is the right word. All of these bashing wars stem from self justification. I use brand X, I’m intimately familiar with Brand X so all other brands are bad. And then revel in the mistakes and shortsightedness of other brands and over look those in Brand X.

    I chose Canon as my first camera and now I have an investment in Canon equipment. If I had a lot of free cash lying around I would buy Nikon as well. So I look at offerings of other manufacturers as a gauge of what the market is doing, but I only look at Canon when it comes to reviewing for purchase.

    I also use Lightroom, because that’s what I got and now it’s inexpensive to upgrade. If I had started with Aperture, I’m sure I would still be using it. Either way it’s no big deal. Competition drives innovation.

  58. You won’t lose me over your post.

    I don’t know that fear is the right word. All of these bashing wars stem from self justification. I use brand X, I’m intimately familiar with Brand X so all other brands are bad. And then revel in the mistakes and shortsightedness of other brands and over look those in Brand X.

    I chose Canon as my first camera and now I have an investment in Canon equipment. If I had a lot of free cash lying around I would buy Nikon as well. So I look at offerings of other manufacturers as a gauge of what the market is doing, but I only look at Canon when it comes to reviewing for purchase.

    I also use Lightroom, because that’s what I got and now it’s inexpensive to upgrade. If I had started with Aperture, I’m sure I would still be using it. Either way it’s no big deal. Competition drives innovation.

  59. I think part of it is plain old consumerism. Not only do we want to own the best, but as soon as new one comes out, we have to upgrade! Maybe we feel like we’ll fall behind if we don’t have the latest and greatest. But we’ll really fall behind if we worry more about gear than our photography!

  60. I think part of it is plain old consumerism. Not only do we want to own the best, but as soon as new one comes out, we have to upgrade! Maybe we feel like we’ll fall behind if we don’t have the latest and greatest. But we’ll really fall behind if we worry more about gear than our photography!

  61. I think it’s also a need for people to be identified with a particular group. It’s easier figure out who a person is by what group they belong to. That guy’s a Nikon or a Canon, Dem or Rep, Mac or PC, etc. Because remember, if we don’t have this system we might actually have to think or interact directly with other people, e gad…

    BTW: I’m a Canon, Mac, Rep. So now you know everything about me. ;)

  62. Its the classic and very human “fear-of-difference”. Canon people bash Nikon-ers for many of the same reasons that there is racism in the world. We are afraid (or at least, dislike) what is different to us because it it unknown and we can’t be supremely knowledgeable about it without giving up a piece of ourselves.

    Good post, Scott. Thanks!

  63. Its the classic and very human “fear-of-difference”. Canon people bash Nikon-ers for many of the same reasons that there is racism in the world. We are afraid (or at least, dislike) what is different to us because it it unknown and we can’t be supremely knowledgeable about it without giving up a piece of ourselves.

    Good post, Scott. Thanks!

  64. @Mark Valentine

    My post has nothing to do with brand loyalty nor socialism. My point is that fear motivates people to engage in hateful acts such as death threats – and no that was not someone being funny – that was serious.

    My team is not interested in creating brand loyalty or the wars that come from people being afraid they made the wrong choice. We work our butts off to do this podcast and blog and like you, we’d like to get paid. The Drobo ads make this possible. Before them it was Audible and after them it will be someone else. We recommend these products because we like them and think they will help our audience. Those folks help pay our bills, but don’t pay us to create brand warriors.

    Actually a pretty cheap shot of you but I let it through because out of 32 commenters, yours was the only one to go there and I think that says a bunch more about you than it does about us.

    Let’s stay on topic. This is about fear not about advertising, or brand loyalty or socialism.

  65. @Mark Valentine

    My post has nothing to do with brand loyalty nor socialism. My point is that fear motivates people to engage in hateful acts such as death threats – and no that was not someone being funny – that was serious.

    My team is not interested in creating brand loyalty or the wars that come from people being afraid they made the wrong choice. We work our butts off to do this podcast and blog and like you, we’d like to get paid. The Drobo ads make this possible. Before them it was Audible and after them it will be someone else. We recommend these products because we like them and think they will help our audience. Those folks help pay our bills, but don’t pay us to create brand warriors.

    Actually a pretty cheap shot of you but I let it through because out of 32 commenters, yours was the only one to go there and I think that says a bunch more about you than it does about us.

    Let’s stay on topic. This is about fear not about advertising, or brand loyalty or socialism.

  66. Fear is what motivates almost every action we take as humans. We are all motivated by…

    The fear of looking bad
    The fear of not looking good

    Yes they are different, just think about them. Which one is more true of you? I’m a not looking good guy.

  67. Hi Scott,

    I think you are absolutely correct about the cause of the brand wars. One detail that I’d like to point out, though, is that most of us are not free to switch from our current camera systems to a better one whenever it may come along. Due to the prohibitive cost of replacing bodies, lenses, speedlights, etc., many non-pro users make a commitment for life to a brand, and even upgrading within a brand can be difficult. This, of course, still doesn’t justify brand crusades, but offers a further insight into our insecurities.

    Nik Avvakumov

  68. Hi Scott,

    I think you are absolutely correct about the cause of the brand wars. One detail that I’d like to point out, though, is that most of us are not free to switch from our current camera systems to a better one whenever it may come along. Due to the prohibitive cost of replacing bodies, lenses, speedlights, etc., many non-pro users make a commitment for life to a brand, and even upgrading within a brand can be difficult. This, of course, still doesn’t justify brand crusades, but offers a further insight into our insecurities.

    Nik Avvakumov

  69. I do wish, though, that people would take a deep breath and just relax a little. All of the camera manufacturers have something special to offer and there is no perfect camera. Price, resolution, noise, build quality / weather resistance, lens selection, interface, post-purchase service, etc. will weigh differently for different folks depending on their needs.

  70. I do wish, though, that people would take a deep breath and just relax a little. All of the camera manufacturers have something special to offer and there is no perfect camera. Price, resolution, noise, build quality / weather resistance, lens selection, interface, post-purchase service, etc. will weigh differently for different folks depending on their needs.

  71. Bravo. Clearly correct and to the point. I think many of us are tired of the rhetoric, and just want to get back to taking great photos. Hey, I’ve got a Sony Alpha, but couldn’t care less what everyone thinks of that – it’s just my tool of choice, nothing more!

    Keep up the great work.

  72. Bravo. Clearly correct and to the point. I think many of us are tired of the rhetoric, and just want to get back to taking great photos. Hey, I’ve got a Sony Alpha, but couldn’t care less what everyone thinks of that – it’s just my tool of choice, nothing more!

    Keep up the great work.

  73. Here Here!
    I Shoot Pentax, and have my reasons. But I don’t (seriously)knock any of the other brands, sometimes we poke fun at each others brands, but its never serious. I strongly agree that its not the tool that makes good photos, its the eye of the shooter.

  74. Here Here!
    I Shoot Pentax, and have my reasons. But I don’t (seriously)knock any of the other brands, sometimes we poke fun at each others brands, but its never serious. I strongly agree that its not the tool that makes good photos, its the eye of the shooter.

  75. Scott,
    You are tack-sharp correct. Fear and it’s close cousin, poor self-esteem, drive these absurd discussions. I love my Nikon gear but I have to say I still can’t look at a photograph and tell if it was made with a Nikon, a Canon, or a whatever. I can’t tell if it was post-processed with Aperture, LR, Nik, or not at all. I am beginning to be able to tell if it was taken by a good photographer, though, thanks to this podcast. TWIP’s efforts are all much appreciated and valuable. I hope you make a fortune off this podcast and I personally have never detected any bias here except toward honest appraisal and discussion. On the other hand, if you try to tell me chocolate ice cream is better than vanilla, you are a dead man. :-))

  76. Scott,
    You are tack-sharp correct. Fear and it’s close cousin, poor self-esteem, drive these absurd discussions. I love my Nikon gear but I have to say I still can’t look at a photograph and tell if it was made with a Nikon, a Canon, or a whatever. I can’t tell if it was post-processed with Aperture, LR, Nik, or not at all. I am beginning to be able to tell if it was taken by a good photographer, though, thanks to this podcast. TWIP’s efforts are all much appreciated and valuable. I hope you make a fortune off this podcast and I personally have never detected any bias here except toward honest appraisal and discussion. On the other hand, if you try to tell me chocolate ice cream is better than vanilla, you are a dead man. :-))

  77. I think that as much as fear is a part of it, I would describe it more as narcissism/egotism, with people liking to think that their buying choices are *right* and that the choices of those who don’t agree with them are *wrong*.

    People have a hard time grasping the idea that personal preference is about individual experience, and not a matter of being right or wrong.

    There is no best camera – there is only the camera that *you* as an individual prefer.

  78. I think that as much as fear is a part of it, I would describe it more as narcissism/egotism, with people liking to think that their buying choices are *right* and that the choices of those who don’t agree with them are *wrong*.

    People have a hard time grasping the idea that personal preference is about individual experience, and not a matter of being right or wrong.

    There is no best camera – there is only the camera that *you* as an individual prefer.

  79. Hello Scott,

    You hit it right on the head, I sell camera equipment and deal with this all the time and I look at some of the people I deal with who say they will only shoot with Nikon, Canon or even Kodak or an off brand that will break down in a couple months and when I try to point out another brand they lock up and refuse to see anything else like they have blinders on which is a real shame.

    I personally shoot with a Nikon S51 and I enjoy using that camera but I have a Canon EOS A2 35mm film SLR that I love more then anything and it has sentimental value since its what I learned from my dad to shoot on and wouldn’t give up for anything so I am open to many brands because they all have their strong points and weak points if we focus more upon those strong points and less about simply about a brand name then we would all be better off and perhaps be much better consumers and photographers as well.

    The biggest flaw I personally see but I imagine that many would disagree with me at the same time so I am going toss this thought out into the internets is that all the advertisements focus upon the complicated high priced dSLRs and point and shoots that are obscenely expensive at times but people want to get them because they are marketed by celebs which annoys me on no end when I have someone ask me and I quote directly from dozens of people I have dealt with “do you have that Nikon that Aston Kutcher uses” and when I show them the price they balk on it so heavily it makes me look at them and say to them “why do you want a camera based upon what a famous person uses as opposed to what you think is best and what appeals to you?” and they give me the worst look until they come in a day later after thinking about it and end up getting something that as good for a lesser price then the S60 or the D90 both of which are great cameras so don’t get me wrong on that.

    People get so set in brand names and series because as many of the other posters have said its massive insecurity and break out of that “box” is detrimental to human nature but what we have to realize is that change is a constant and in many ways its what life is about or where would these companies be now?

    I am going to finish off this post with a quote by a man named Jose Ortega y Gasset since it applies to this posting

    “To be surprised, to wonder, is to begin to understand.”

    ~Mike

  80. Hello Scott,

    You hit it right on the head, I sell camera equipment and deal with this all the time and I look at some of the people I deal with who say they will only shoot with Nikon, Canon or even Kodak or an off brand that will break down in a couple months and when I try to point out another brand they lock up and refuse to see anything else like they have blinders on which is a real shame.

    I personally shoot with a Nikon S51 and I enjoy using that camera but I have a Canon EOS A2 35mm film SLR that I love more then anything and it has sentimental value since its what I learned from my dad to shoot on and wouldn’t give up for anything so I am open to many brands because they all have their strong points and weak points if we focus more upon those strong points and less about simply about a brand name then we would all be better off and perhaps be much better consumers and photographers as well.

    The biggest flaw I personally see but I imagine that many would disagree with me at the same time so I am going toss this thought out into the internets is that all the advertisements focus upon the complicated high priced dSLRs and point and shoots that are obscenely expensive at times but people want to get them because they are marketed by celebs which annoys me on no end when I have someone ask me and I quote directly from dozens of people I have dealt with “do you have that Nikon that Aston Kutcher uses” and when I show them the price they balk on it so heavily it makes me look at them and say to them “why do you want a camera based upon what a famous person uses as opposed to what you think is best and what appeals to you?” and they give me the worst look until they come in a day later after thinking about it and end up getting something that as good for a lesser price then the S60 or the D90 both of which are great cameras so don’t get me wrong on that.

    People get so set in brand names and series because as many of the other posters have said its massive insecurity and break out of that “box” is detrimental to human nature but what we have to realize is that change is a constant and in many ways its what life is about or where would these companies be now?

    I am going to finish off this post with a quote by a man named Jose Ortega y Gasset since it applies to this posting

    “To be surprised, to wonder, is to begin to understand.”

    ~Mike

  81. If you gave Edward Weston or Imogen Cunningham a Holga, I would bet that they could make beautiful images with it. If you gave them a $10 35mm SLR from eBay they could make beautiful images and have the control they would want. If you give an $8000 DSLR to a crappy photographer their images will still be crappy.

    Ultimately it does not matter what camera you have. What matters is your skill and talent. Sure having a good camera can help a good photographer have more images that are keepers and do so with greater ease, But what brand or model you have does not have any bearing on how good a photographer you are.

  82. If you gave Edward Weston or Imogen Cunningham a Holga, I would bet that they could make beautiful images with it. If you gave them a $10 35mm SLR from eBay they could make beautiful images and have the control they would want. If you give an $8000 DSLR to a crappy photographer their images will still be crappy.

    Ultimately it does not matter what camera you have. What matters is your skill and talent. Sure having a good camera can help a good photographer have more images that are keepers and do so with greater ease, But what brand or model you have does not have any bearing on how good a photographer you are.

  83. whatever floats your boat is important. we all feel comfortable with whatever we choose but we should remember, not everything is as it seems

  84. whatever floats your boat is important. we all feel comfortable with whatever we choose but we should remember, not everything is as it seems

  85. Scott-

    Very well put. I’m actually using my iPhone right now to type this comment! I’ve also found that the iPhone’s camera is surprisingly capable!

    BJ

  86. Scott-

    Very well put. I’m actually using my iPhone right now to type this comment! I’ve also found that the iPhone’s camera is surprisingly capable!

    BJ

  87. Anytime anyone puts a lot of time & money into something, be it cameras, computers or religion, there always tends to be a certain defensive nature that comes into play. There is always that fear of “did I make the right decision?” People start building a support system that affirms their choice (friends, user groups, churches, etc)

    I think that Scott has it exactly right in his astute blog.

    And for those who think the religious angle is a stretch, consider people who send death threats when someone publishes a cartoon or story that that religious group considers offensive… like the death threats Scott received.

    Oh, and although I am a Canon/Aperture user (and I use these tools because I enjoy using them) I would have no problems with “switching” if the circumstances dictated.

  88. Anytime anyone puts a lot of time & money into something, be it cameras, computers or religion, there always tends to be a certain defensive nature that comes into play. There is always that fear of “did I make the right decision?” People start building a support system that affirms their choice (friends, user groups, churches, etc)

    I think that Scott has it exactly right in his astute blog.

    And for those who think the religious angle is a stretch, consider people who send death threats when someone publishes a cartoon or story that that religious group considers offensive… like the death threats Scott received.

    Oh, and although I am a Canon/Aperture user (and I use these tools because I enjoy using them) I would have no problems with “switching” if the circumstances dictated.

  89. @ Scott,

    You hit the nail on the head. Old school marketers refer to this as cognitive dissonance. It’s either the fear of having just bought something and making the wrong call – or people going over the top to convince themselves they did the right thing in purchasing said item.

    I have mid level gear and a few pro lenses. I have seen lots of people shoot way better photos than I ever good with a cheaper camera and cheaper glass. On Canon and Nikon – so I just keep my mouth shut! ;-)

  90. @ Scott,

    You hit the nail on the head. Old school marketers refer to this as cognitive dissonance. It’s either the fear of having just bought something and making the wrong call – or people going over the top to convince themselves they did the right thing in purchasing said item.

    I have mid level gear and a few pro lenses. I have seen lots of people shoot way better photos than I ever good with a cheaper camera and cheaper glass. On Canon and Nikon – so I just keep my mouth shut! ;-)

  91. Thank you for this post. I agree with every point! I won’t mention which system I use specifically but I will say that I worship at the altar of one of the 2 big churches. A friend of mine is getting into photography and uses the Sony system. I asked her one day very sincerely how she liked it. She answered “why? are you gonna give me crap about it too?” Apparently she has received alot of flack from colleagues in camera club and forums for using the Sony Alpha system. I think that is awful. I told her she takes great pictures because she does, and nobody would ever know what she shot with if she never told anyone.

  92. Thank you for this post. I agree with every point! I won’t mention which system I use specifically but I will say that I worship at the altar of one of the 2 big churches. A friend of mine is getting into photography and uses the Sony system. I asked her one day very sincerely how she liked it. She answered “why? are you gonna give me crap about it too?” Apparently she has received alot of flack from colleagues in camera club and forums for using the Sony Alpha system. I think that is awful. I told her she takes great pictures because she does, and nobody would ever know what she shot with if she never told anyone.

  93. “Selfishness is not living as one wishes to live, it is asking others to live as one wishes to live.”
    -Oscar Wilde-
    Is this the reason people try to convince me to use a certain product when I prefer the competitor?

  94. “Selfishness is not living as one wishes to live, it is asking others to live as one wishes to live.”
    -Oscar Wilde-
    Is this the reason people try to convince me to use a certain product when I prefer the competitor?

  95. This post came at a perfect time! There was someone I know that was looking into buying a DSLR and didn’t know which one to go with, Canon or Nikon.
    I showed them a nice option of both. I like either one. :-)

  96. This post came at a perfect time! There was someone I know that was looking into buying a DSLR and didn’t know which one to go with, Canon or Nikon.
    I showed them a nice option of both. I like either one. :-)

  97. In 1969, fresh out of college, I was hired by a studio to be a commercial photographer. They placed a Nikon in my hands and said “Make us money.” The limiting factor is my talent, and as a tool the Nikon did what I wanted and still does. The extreme brand attachment you speak of has nothing to do with photography, it is a mental problem best handled by a psychiatrist.

  98. In 1969, fresh out of college, I was hired by a studio to be a commercial photographer. They placed a Nikon in my hands and said “Make us money.” The limiting factor is my talent, and as a tool the Nikon did what I wanted and still does. The extreme brand attachment you speak of has nothing to do with photography, it is a mental problem best handled by a psychiatrist.

  99. Great post Scott. I remember when I was buying my DSLR, all my DSLR owning friends I talked to owned a Canon and told me that is what I needed, except for one who owned an Olympus, who was adamant about me buying an Olympus. In the end I bought a Nikon because after I played with all of them that was the one I felt comfortable using.

    My Canon friends thought I was crazy and constantly poke me about how Nikon sucks, etc. My Olympus friend, after using my camera, now wishes it was what he had ;)

  100. Great post Scott. I remember when I was buying my DSLR, all my DSLR owning friends I talked to owned a Canon and told me that is what I needed, except for one who owned an Olympus, who was adamant about me buying an Olympus. In the end I bought a Nikon because after I played with all of them that was the one I felt comfortable using.

    My Canon friends thought I was crazy and constantly poke me about how Nikon sucks, etc. My Olympus friend, after using my camera, now wishes it was what he had ;)

  101. Death threats!!
    Some people are desperately in need of a life.
    Occasionally the photo magazines give so called cheapo cameras to a handfull of pros and publish the results.
    Maybe you guys should try the same trick on the blog.

  102. Death threats!!
    Some people are desperately in need of a life.
    Occasionally the photo magazines give so called cheapo cameras to a handfull of pros and publish the results.
    Maybe you guys should try the same trick on the blog.

  103. Unfortunately too many people begin to rely solemnly to their equipment for better results. Therefore they go out and purchase the best equipment they can afford. Then as you indicated, when they don’t see the “wow” effect in their results there comes disbelief and insecurity. I see this over and over in different areas. In Golfing with clubs and balls, in fishing with reels and rods, in target shooting with guns and ammos. People can’t believe why their golf game is not improved after purchasing the same clubs Tiger Woods use? Buying the same microphone Pavarotti used doesn’t make you sound better.
    Same with the cameras, the reason most of those “BRAND LOYAL” people is brand loyal for ONE REASON ONLY: ” They can’t afford to buy all of the better built cameras and lenses for different situations. Give anyone of those so called brand loyal people $100,000 credit from a major camera store and watch them how they go crazy and purchase all cross brands and everything in between.

  104. Scott, the point you are making is so true. Fanboys (of every type and gender) are the worst thing about any hobby.

    I’m envious of my Nikon shooting friend because he can step up to the D700/D3 sensor and he has the 24-120 lens, but he envies some of my portrait work because he loves the pictures I get from my Pentax 50/1.4 lens and the 16-45 lens is good too. (I shoot Pentax because I’ve had Pentax gear since my first camera, and I just like being able to put my old screw mount or medium format lenses on my DSLR. Plus, the 50/1.4 is just gorgeous.)

    The reality is that pretty much every single DSLR on the market today is a very fine camera indeed (unless you’ve got some weird model built by idiots) and that it’s almost guaranteed that the limiting factor on your photographs is the photographer and not the equipment.

  105. Scott, the point you are making is so true. Fanboys (of every type and gender) are the worst thing about any hobby.

    I’m envious of my Nikon shooting friend because he can step up to the D700/D3 sensor and he has the 24-120 lens, but he envies some of my portrait work because he loves the pictures I get from my Pentax 50/1.4 lens and the 16-45 lens is good too. (I shoot Pentax because I’ve had Pentax gear since my first camera, and I just like being able to put my old screw mount or medium format lenses on my DSLR. Plus, the 50/1.4 is just gorgeous.)

    The reality is that pretty much every single DSLR on the market today is a very fine camera indeed (unless you’ve got some weird model built by idiots) and that it’s almost guaranteed that the limiting factor on your photographs is the photographer and not the equipment.

  106. Great article and I totally agree. The forums of a photography club I participate often erupt into brand bashing. Whether or not they’re joking I decide to remain out of the discussion because I don’t need to justify my brand choice to anyone else.

  107. Great article and I totally agree. The forums of a photography club I participate often erupt into brand bashing. Whether or not they’re joking I decide to remain out of the discussion because I don’t need to justify my brand choice to anyone else.

  108. This is all so silly.
    In July I dropped my D50. After crying, I was trying to decide what to replace it with. I thought really hard about the Canon 40D. I’d seen it at Costco and was really impressed with it. I ended up going with the Nikon D80. I didn’t want to deal with selling all my lenses and learning what there particular behavior was. I know my Nikon gear, so I’m not going to switch.

    Another thing within the brand is model number battle. A month after I bought my D80, Nikon announced the D90. I knew this was going to happen and it didn’t bother me. Suddenly though, from some Nikon people, you would think I was chiseling images in granite with my ANTIQUATED D80. It’s ridiculous.

    As someone else said:You can put a Holga in a good photographers hands and get good images, and conversely put a D3x in a beginners hands and end up with junk. Concentrate on making images, composing and forget about what the newest toy is.
    Merry Christmas and happy holidays all!
    May we all get cool new gear as gifts.
    I’m hoping for a lensbaby.

  109. This is all so silly.
    In July I dropped my D50. After crying, I was trying to decide what to replace it with. I thought really hard about the Canon 40D. I’d seen it at Costco and was really impressed with it. I ended up going with the Nikon D80. I didn’t want to deal with selling all my lenses and learning what there particular behavior was. I know my Nikon gear, so I’m not going to switch.

    Another thing within the brand is model number battle. A month after I bought my D80, Nikon announced the D90. I knew this was going to happen and it didn’t bother me. Suddenly though, from some Nikon people, you would think I was chiseling images in granite with my ANTIQUATED D80. It’s ridiculous.

    As someone else said:You can put a Holga in a good photographers hands and get good images, and conversely put a D3x in a beginners hands and end up with junk. Concentrate on making images, composing and forget about what the newest toy is.
    Merry Christmas and happy holidays all!
    May we all get cool new gear as gifts.
    I’m hoping for a lensbaby.

  110. Well this just SUX! What are we supposed to fight about now? Darn it…

  111. Well this just SUX! What are we supposed to fight about now? Darn it…

  112. I’ve used various brands over the past 30 years. Cost is a prime factor along with system flexibility. When going digital in 2005, I chose Nikon. As I review my use-cases for full-frame photography, I realize I need a higher number of pixels so I will have enough headroom for the type of post processing I plan to do on upcoming projects. Canon and Sony provide 20 MP+ solutions for under $3K. Nikon starts at $8K with the D3x. At that price, I can buy a complete competitor’s system that meets my requirements. I will end up owning 2 systems in 2009. Brand loyalty does not get me what I need. I am sorry to say it, but Nikon has offended me with their D3x pricing. They have actually made me a less-loyal customer than before.

  113. I’ve used various brands over the past 30 years. Cost is a prime factor along with system flexibility. When going digital in 2005, I chose Nikon. As I review my use-cases for full-frame photography, I realize I need a higher number of pixels so I will have enough headroom for the type of post processing I plan to do on upcoming projects. Canon and Sony provide 20 MP+ solutions for under $3K. Nikon starts at $8K with the D3x. At that price, I can buy a complete competitor’s system that meets my requirements. I will end up owning 2 systems in 2009. Brand loyalty does not get me what I need. I am sorry to say it, but Nikon has offended me with their D3x pricing. They have actually made me a less-loyal customer than before.

  114. I’ll be honest, I’m a Canon guy. It’s really just what I like an prefer…plus I’ve made an investment. So, that’s what I’d recommend to people first, but if they ask about a Nikon I’d have no problem telling them that there’s great cameras in their lineup and I don’t just mean the D3. Although, I’m not quite the same way about Macs.

    Anyway I think it’s a great article and your last paragraph is true. Use what makes you feel good. Whatever is better FOR YOU. It doesn’t matter if the D3 is the ‘best’ if it doesn’t feel right in your hands or you have hold it steady. Or if the LX3 doesn’t have enough reach or the G10 is too bulky, then get the camera that works for you. The end result is all that matters. I don’t care what software the print I’m buying was processed with or which camera took the picture. All I care about is that the end product looks good.

  115. I’ll be honest, I’m a Canon guy. It’s really just what I like an prefer…plus I’ve made an investment. So, that’s what I’d recommend to people first, but if they ask about a Nikon I’d have no problem telling them that there’s great cameras in their lineup and I don’t just mean the D3. Although, I’m not quite the same way about Macs.

    Anyway I think it’s a great article and your last paragraph is true. Use what makes you feel good. Whatever is better FOR YOU. It doesn’t matter if the D3 is the ‘best’ if it doesn’t feel right in your hands or you have hold it steady. Or if the LX3 doesn’t have enough reach or the G10 is too bulky, then get the camera that works for you. The end result is all that matters. I don’t care what software the print I’m buying was processed with or which camera took the picture. All I care about is that the end product looks good.

  116. Finally, it’s said – nice one.

    I am sick to death of the morons that run riot in photo forums who cannot accept that their brand could possibly ever come second, to anything, ever.

    It sucks the very life out of me.

  117. Finally, it’s said – nice one.

    I am sick to death of the morons that run riot in photo forums who cannot accept that their brand could possibly ever come second, to anything, ever.

    It sucks the very life out of me.

  118. @Craig S. I am not sure at all why you feel the need to bash Nikon in this thread or what it has to do with my post. But OK. I let you do it.

  119. @Craig S. I am not sure at all why you feel the need to bash Nikon in this thread or what it has to do with my post. But OK. I let you do it.

  120. When a friend invited me to a wine tasting, I feared that I would be surrounded by arrogant snobs. My freind introduced the evening wtih a definition of a good glass of wine – “It is a glass of wine that you enjoy drinking. While the opinion of others might help you find the right wine, it is your own opinion and experience that define what is good for you.”
    Why can’t we forget all of our snobbery and rationalization and let everyone find the brand or camera that is right for her/him, and let them enjoy it. Besides, Scott and Ken Rockwell make the same point repeatedly – It’s not the camera, it’s the photographer behind the camera.
    Happy shooting,
    MS

  121. When a friend invited me to a wine tasting, I feared that I would be surrounded by arrogant snobs. My freind introduced the evening wtih a definition of a good glass of wine – “It is a glass of wine that you enjoy drinking. While the opinion of others might help you find the right wine, it is your own opinion and experience that define what is good for you.”
    Why can’t we forget all of our snobbery and rationalization and let everyone find the brand or camera that is right for her/him, and let them enjoy it. Besides, Scott and Ken Rockwell make the same point repeatedly – It’s not the camera, it’s the photographer behind the camera.
    Happy shooting,
    MS

  122. I just wanted to add into the pile of comments and say thank you for such an accurate article. I see the brand wars going on around me constantly no matter what the venue. Because I work in the IT industry and to a fair amount of customer support, I’m always asked “if I should buy Brand X or Brand Y?” I try my hardest to give the pros and cons of any choices and try to probe the person as best as I can to open up about what they wish to do. A lot of the time, it’s not about if Brand X is better, it’s if Brand X is the best for the task.

  123. I just wanted to add into the pile of comments and say thank you for such an accurate article. I see the brand wars going on around me constantly no matter what the venue. Because I work in the IT industry and to a fair amount of customer support, I’m always asked “if I should buy Brand X or Brand Y?” I try my hardest to give the pros and cons of any choices and try to probe the person as best as I can to open up about what they wish to do. A lot of the time, it’s not about if Brand X is better, it’s if Brand X is the best for the task.

  124. Well you said it Scott. I’ve been involved in a lot of Mac vs windows debates and it boils down to this: people don’t like to be told that the item they’ve spent money is not liked by everyone. It’s a sad kind of insecurity.

    I shoot Sony and use a Mac, but you will never see me post a negative comment against opposing brands. (Well, maybe Microsoft)

  125. As a person who has hammered a nail or two I can tell you that there is a big difference in hammers, however, every type gives the same end result, you just may have to work harder to get there.

    We should all relish in the fact that Canon vs. Nikon and Lightroom vs. Aperture exist. As consumers we have access to better products at better prices because of this competition. I use Canon and Lightroom and want to thank all of the Nikon/Aperture people for balancing the market.

  126. As a person who has hammered a nail or two I can tell you that there is a big difference in hammers, however, every type gives the same end result, you just may have to work harder to get there.

    We should all relish in the fact that Canon vs. Nikon and Lightroom vs. Aperture exist. As consumers we have access to better products at better prices because of this competition. I use Canon and Lightroom and want to thank all of the Nikon/Aperture people for balancing the market.

  127. Superb!!

  128. As a newbie to the prosumer dSLR world a few months ago, I had to dive into all the PR and blog postings to narrow down my choices. And as long as my parameters where met (well known name, a few bells and whistles, and budget), I had a choice of a few tools for my new hobby.

    And during my exploration for my equipment, I came to realize the similarities to another hobby of mine. Golf. I have met many people who have searched and procured the latest and greatest driver, only to be stumped when I comment “Gee, for that money on a new driver, you could have gotten yourself ten private golf lessons. … Which, would have made you a better golfer?”

    It’s not the tool, it’s the mind behind it.

  129. As a newbie to the prosumer dSLR world a few months ago, I had to dive into all the PR and blog postings to narrow down my choices. And as long as my parameters where met (well known name, a few bells and whistles, and budget), I had a choice of a few tools for my new hobby.

    And during my exploration for my equipment, I came to realize the similarities to another hobby of mine. Golf. I have met many people who have searched and procured the latest and greatest driver, only to be stumped when I comment “Gee, for that money on a new driver, you could have gotten yourself ten private golf lessons. … Which, would have made you a better golfer?”

    It’s not the tool, it’s the mind behind it.

  130. I agree with pretty much everything you say Scott, but would add a couple of extra reasons. As well as fear of having made the wrong choice, there is also the desire for status and approval. People get a strong positive feeling from being the owner of ‘the’ camera/brand of the moment. ‘Wow, is that the XXXX, I hear that is the best camera around at the moment, you must be super intelligent/knowledgeable/wealthy/sexy’. Status relies on two things, being top dog and others recognising that you are top dog. So when someone challenges whether you/your group are top dog, you are going to argue. The second reason is rational. People have a big investment in their system and really don’t want to have to switch. None of this is an issue if you have the money to switch to the latest/greatest. But if you can’t afford to change your gear, it is no surprise that people will try hard to change everyone else’s opinion of what is best.

  131. I agree with pretty much everything you say Scott, but would add a couple of extra reasons. As well as fear of having made the wrong choice, there is also the desire for status and approval. People get a strong positive feeling from being the owner of ‘the’ camera/brand of the moment. ‘Wow, is that the XXXX, I hear that is the best camera around at the moment, you must be super intelligent/knowledgeable/wealthy/sexy’. Status relies on two things, being top dog and others recognising that you are top dog. So when someone challenges whether you/your group are top dog, you are going to argue. The second reason is rational. People have a big investment in their system and really don’t want to have to switch. None of this is an issue if you have the money to switch to the latest/greatest. But if you can’t afford to change your gear, it is no surprise that people will try hard to change everyone else’s opinion of what is best.

  132. There is so much emphasis on the equipment, when the really concern should be the final output. If you try and keep up with the latest and greatest you will be no better than the dog chasing his own tail. Mastery of you craft will yield the greatest results and personal satisfaction.

  133. There is so much emphasis on the equipment, when the really concern should be the final output. If you try and keep up with the latest and greatest you will be no better than the dog chasing his own tail. Mastery of you craft will yield the greatest results and personal satisfaction.

  134. Well said. Right on the money.

    An amazing amount of crap in this world is around because of fear.

  135. Well said. Right on the money.

    An amazing amount of crap in this world is around because of fear.

  136. I for one am afraid of making the right choice in the camera wars. As long as I choose the wrong brand, at least I have an excuse for the crappy photos I usually take.

  137. I for one am afraid of making the right choice in the camera wars. As long as I choose the wrong brand, at least I have an excuse for the crappy photos I usually take.

  138. Hi Scott,

    After 70 odd responses to your blog post, there’s not a whole lot more that I could add except to say ‘ … thanks, and well done …’

  139. Well put. I originally started out with Nikon, but switched to Canon. I bought the 40D when it first came out because it shot at 6.5fps vs. the 3fps with my D70s. I shoot sports about 25 percent of the time, and it made sense to me. I also have more friend who shoot canon and we can share lenses.

    That being said, if I look back through my photos, I have great shots that I include in my portfolio that were taken with my Nikon D70s. Getting the right lighting, exposure, etc. has more to do with the person behind the camera. (although I am envious of the high ISO capability of the D3…)

    People should go out and take more pictures instead of whining.

  140. Well put. I originally started out with Nikon, but switched to Canon. I bought the 40D when it first came out because it shot at 6.5fps vs. the 3fps with my D70s. I shoot sports about 25 percent of the time, and it made sense to me. I also have more friend who shoot canon and we can share lenses.

    That being said, if I look back through my photos, I have great shots that I include in my portfolio that were taken with my Nikon D70s. Getting the right lighting, exposure, etc. has more to do with the person behind the camera. (although I am envious of the high ISO capability of the D3…)

    People should go out and take more pictures instead of whining.

  141. Hey Scott;

    Quite a quandry…and something that is more or less a permanent element of a capitalism.
    Product marketing is founded on creating zealotry – marketers intend to whip people into a religious identification with the product, and thoroughly demonize and villify the competition as part of the process. It is the core of marketing everywhere, and the manufacturers love it and encourage it. They want a Jonestown cult following (known as “brand loyalists”), because they are easiest to retail to in the future. Sell the sizzle, not the steak – a fraction of a percentage would buy based on the specs sheet, so gotta weave an emotional mythology and stoke the religious hype to white hot.

    A professionals is concerned with what the product does for them and values it for that reason, while amateurs are involved in a relationship with an object as a “personal”extension of themselves. Therefore, expressing anything positive about an opposing product (or worse, anything critical about the opposition) is the same as making a personal attack on the individual owning that product. And naturally it evokes an intense and hostile response.

    When you switched to Nikon, it was accepted by the Canon cultists as a “personal” rejection. To those personally identified with their objects, it is automatically rationalized that one can only leave the faith as act of hate, abandonment and treachery. It is an offense, responded to with anger and outrage, all the way to abiding interests to harm.

    Valuing the objects in our lives that do wonderful things for us is natural.
    However, placing our personal validity and value externally in the objects we possess, is the abandonment of a rational relationship to those products…and people.
    The only cure is when a person genuinely recognizes the truth of their own inherent worth and validity. Then, attempting to derive this from “things” is no longer a compulsion.

    But, self-respecting people are a marketer’s worse nightmare… :shock:
    :D

  142. Hey Scott;

    Quite a quandry…and something that is more or less a permanent element of a capitalism.
    Product marketing is founded on creating zealotry – marketers intend to whip people into a religious identification with the product, and thoroughly demonize and villify the competition as part of the process. It is the core of marketing everywhere, and the manufacturers love it and encourage it. They want a Jonestown cult following (known as “brand loyalists”), because they are easiest to retail to in the future. Sell the sizzle, not the steak – a fraction of a percentage would buy based on the specs sheet, so gotta weave an emotional mythology and stoke the religious hype to white hot.

    A professionals is concerned with what the product does for them and values it for that reason, while amateurs are involved in a relationship with an object as a “personal”extension of themselves. Therefore, expressing anything positive about an opposing product (or worse, anything critical about the opposition) is the same as making a personal attack on the individual owning that product. And naturally it evokes an intense and hostile response.

    When you switched to Nikon, it was accepted by the Canon cultists as a “personal” rejection. To those personally identified with their objects, it is automatically rationalized that one can only leave the faith as act of hate, abandonment and treachery. It is an offense, responded to with anger and outrage, all the way to abiding interests to harm.

    Valuing the objects in our lives that do wonderful things for us is natural.
    However, placing our personal validity and value externally in the objects we possess, is the abandonment of a rational relationship to those products…and people.
    The only cure is when a person genuinely recognizes the truth of their own inherent worth and validity. Then, attempting to derive this from “things” is no longer a compulsion.

    But, self-respecting people are a marketer’s worse nightmare… :shock:
    :D

  143. People have deep emotional and monetary investments with their brands. Naturally, we humans want that confirms our emotions and validates our spending. It’s difficult to accept information that counters our choices from perceived trusted sources.

  144. People have deep emotional and monetary investments with their brands. Naturally, we humans want that confirms our emotions and validates our spending. It’s difficult to accept information that counters our choices from perceived trusted sources.

  145. @Michael Critz I am sorry but I deleted the political reference from your comment knowing it could very well cause the thread to be hijacked. That said, I agree with its sentiment.

  146. @Michael Critz I am sorry but I deleted the political reference from your comment knowing it could very well cause the thread to be hijacked. That said, I agree with its sentiment.

  147. @Scott good call. I sort-of regretted hitting submit after writing it. Cheers!

  148. @Scott good call. I sort-of regretted hitting submit after writing it. Cheers!

  149. Quin B, as far as I can tell, product marketing by itself doesn’t create zealotry. I don’t remember seeing a camera ad that says or suggests that people that buy some other brand are stupid, or that competitors only sell junk. How can they sell the product if they insult the customers that they are trying to woo? As far as I’ve seen, there aren’t a whole lot of ads that I see that feed on or foment such zealotry, with the exception of political ads. And I’m not going there.

    As far as I’m concerned, brand considerations are mainly relevant when you have an existing investment of equipment, or access to it if you can rent and borrow components.

  150. Quin B, as far as I can tell, product marketing by itself doesn’t create zealotry. I don’t remember seeing a camera ad that says or suggests that people that buy some other brand are stupid, or that competitors only sell junk. How can they sell the product if they insult the customers that they are trying to woo? As far as I’ve seen, there aren’t a whole lot of ads that I see that feed on or foment such zealotry, with the exception of political ads. And I’m not going there.

    As far as I’m concerned, brand considerations are mainly relevant when you have an existing investment of equipment, or access to it if you can rent and borrow components.

  151. Amen! oh, sorry. :-)

    There is a tendency for us to “wear” the brands we use – as noted in an article, many years ago, about smoking. This seems so much more overt today than when I was young.

    Some of my best photographs were made on an old Pentax Spotmatic (in 2002) or, an even older, Kodak Retinette (back in the 1970′s). The Kodak Pony’s not bad, either.

    We are an insecure species, are we not?

  152. Amen! oh, sorry. :-)

    There is a tendency for us to “wear” the brands we use – as noted in an article, many years ago, about smoking. This seems so much more overt today than when I was young.

    Some of my best photographs were made on an old Pentax Spotmatic (in 2002) or, an even older, Kodak Retinette (back in the 1970′s). The Kodak Pony’s not bad, either.

    We are an insecure species, are we not?

  153. Scott – well said, as usual. Some people just take life too seriously. You’re comment about photography being fun is the most important. Get out and shoot people……

    Merry Christmas to all and happy shooting in 2009.

  154. Scott – well said, as usual. Some people just take life too seriously. You’re comment about photography being fun is the most important. Get out and shoot people……

    Merry Christmas to all and happy shooting in 2009.

  155. “Begun, these drone wars have.”

    I definitely agree with your post. However, I think you may have missed a few points that contribute to the problem.

    1) Camera manufactures have sold (at least to the general public) the idea that it’s the camera that makes the picture and getting the newest, latest, greatest camera will instantly let you take awesome photos.

    2) Even level-headed people such as the TWIP staff get into the brand wars, even if only jokingly and for the entertainment value. People don’t need that reinforced and could use a positive example.

  156. “Begun, these drone wars have.”

    I definitely agree with your post. However, I think you may have missed a few points that contribute to the problem.

    1) Camera manufactures have sold (at least to the general public) the idea that it’s the camera that makes the picture and getting the newest, latest, greatest camera will instantly let you take awesome photos.

    2) Even level-headed people such as the TWIP staff get into the brand wars, even if only jokingly and for the entertainment value. People don’t need that reinforced and could use a positive example.

  157. As always, a thoughtful, insightful, and to the point post, Scott. I agree that the brand wars can often be counter-productive to the real goal (in this case, taking more great pictures).

    I would add that thebesnd wars might also come from a fear of not belonging. Seth Godin has written extensively on the concept of “Tribes,” groups of people who want to belong to something. The caconical example would be the massively organized Harley Davidson and NASCAR communities. This people, afraid of not belonging the “cool group” go out and very heavily promote the brand. From a brand equity and sales perspective, it’s great for re company. But as you point out, there can be unforseen negative outcomes.

  158. As always, a thoughtful, insightful, and to the point post, Scott. I agree that the brand wars can often be counter-productive to the real goal (in this case, taking more great pictures).

    I would add that thebesnd wars might also come from a fear of not belonging. Seth Godin has written extensively on the concept of “Tribes,” groups of people who want to belong to something. The caconical example would be the massively organized Harley Davidson and NASCAR communities. This people, afraid of not belonging the “cool group” go out and very heavily promote the brand. From a brand equity and sales perspective, it’s great for re company. But as you point out, there can be unforseen negative outcomes.

  159. @Jim3535 please note I said MOST not all of this is based on fear. There are of course other factors, but fear is the biggest. As for joking around on TWIP – no possible way you could compare that to my receipt of death threats. It’s a red herring. But you got to make the point anyway.

  160. @Jim3535 please note I said MOST not all of this is based on fear. There are of course other factors, but fear is the biggest. As for joking around on TWIP – no possible way you could compare that to my receipt of death threats. It’s a red herring. But you got to make the point anyway.

  161. Scott,

    Well said.

    I hope that the threats were turned over to law enforcement. The internet IS the real world, and should be treated accordingly, IMHO.

    Beyond that, it has been interesting to read the comments, but even more interesting to note that, as consumers of these products (which, after all are supposedly made to serve US and OUR needs as photographers), why are we not asking this question:

    Why have the major manufacturers of camera equipment chosen to create these “silos,” that prevent us from combining best-in-class cameras, with best-in-class accessories? (And why do they expend so much of their marketing resources in maintaining the silos?)

    Instead they pit rock star against movie star, in an attempt to hook noobs on their brand. Do I want Avril Lavigne’s xts, or Ashton’s Nikon? Hmmm. Am I am Ashton photographer, or a Avril photographer? Decisions, decisions … (After all, the brand I choose, for all practical purposes, ties up my equipment investments for life. … gulp … but then, I don’t know that yet, do I?)

    Shame on us as users of this equipment. WE should be steering the bus – on forums like this, especially in this New Age of the Interactive Interwebs … Why are WE not steering the debate?

    Nikon, Canon et al have left the field wide open. Here’s to some new manufacturer that focuses on the needs of users, and are not afraid to build best-in-class equipment, with full interchangablility. The company that creates and opens THAT new standard will have me as a fanboy.

    Best of the Season. You guys are great!

    Paul

    P.S. Boxers! (kidding, kidding … )

  162. Scott,

    Well said.

    I hope that the threats were turned over to law enforcement. The internet IS the real world, and should be treated accordingly, IMHO.

    Beyond that, it has been interesting to read the comments, but even more interesting to note that, as consumers of these products (which, after all are supposedly made to serve US and OUR needs as photographers), why are we not asking this question:

    Why have the major manufacturers of camera equipment chosen to create these “silos,” that prevent us from combining best-in-class cameras, with best-in-class accessories? (And why do they expend so much of their marketing resources in maintaining the silos?)

    Instead they pit rock star against movie star, in an attempt to hook noobs on their brand. Do I want Avril Lavigne’s xts, or Ashton’s Nikon? Hmmm. Am I am Ashton photographer, or a Avril photographer? Decisions, decisions … (After all, the brand I choose, for all practical purposes, ties up my equipment investments for life. … gulp … but then, I don’t know that yet, do I?)

    Shame on us as users of this equipment. WE should be steering the bus – on forums like this, especially in this New Age of the Interactive Interwebs … Why are WE not steering the debate?

    Nikon, Canon et al have left the field wide open. Here’s to some new manufacturer that focuses on the needs of users, and are not afraid to build best-in-class equipment, with full interchangablility. The company that creates and opens THAT new standard will have me as a fanboy.

    Best of the Season. You guys are great!

    Paul

    P.S. Boxers! (kidding, kidding … )

  163. When it comes to me I am a Nikon fan. Want to know how I became a Nikon fan? When I was in the the camera store looking for my first good DSLR, I was presented with a good selection of Cannon and Nikon cameras. The salesman behind the counter was completely unbiased and he only showed me the cameras that were within my price range. As it turns out it literally boiled down to a flip of the coin. Heads- Nikon, Tails- Cannon. Neither company had any real compelling advantage over the other and and when I flipped the coin and it came up Heads, then I knew the real tough part was trying to convince my wife (which was easier than expected) of which Nikon I wanted to get. In the end I bought the Nikon D80 and I have loved it ever since, but I know also that I could have bought a similar priced Cannon and I would be just as pleased.

    Great article Scott

  164. When it comes to me I am a Nikon fan. Want to know how I became a Nikon fan? When I was in the the camera store looking for my first good DSLR, I was presented with a good selection of Cannon and Nikon cameras. The salesman behind the counter was completely unbiased and he only showed me the cameras that were within my price range. As it turns out it literally boiled down to a flip of the coin. Heads- Nikon, Tails- Cannon. Neither company had any real compelling advantage over the other and and when I flipped the coin and it came up Heads, then I knew the real tough part was trying to convince my wife (which was easier than expected) of which Nikon I wanted to get. In the end I bought the Nikon D80 and I have loved it ever since, but I know also that I could have bought a similar priced Cannon and I would be just as pleased.

    Great article Scott

  165. Although Mr. Bourne raises some very valid points.
    There is one thing that is missing from his argument.
    It’s that of a huge monetary investment.

    To take myself as an example.
    I have well over $35,000 invested into my Canon set up.
    Multiple camera bodies, glass ranging from 14mm to 600mm, with a multitude of accessories.

    Would I love to change to Nikon and take advantage of the new low noise and low light capabilities? you betcha, Yes I would, can I afford to?

    Not unless I’m willing to take a loss on the equipment I have now.

    I couldn’t replace my gear one for one from Canon to Nikon, without putting out a considerable amount of cash. So I stick with the brand I’m currently with, because it’s an easier monetary choice. I can upgrade bodies, knowing my lenses will work. I can upgrade lenses knowing that they’ll work with my current bodies, along with strobes, remotes, and all the other multitude of accessories that I currently own.

    So yes I become a little more loyal to my current brand.

    I like many other users out there can’t afford to switch back and forth between brands, as new technological advancements are instituted between brands. It’s not cost effective, and if photography is your primary business, and not a hobby, it’s detrimental to your bottom line.

    Just taking a look from the business side of things.

  166. Although Mr. Bourne raises some very valid points.
    There is one thing that is missing from his argument.
    It’s that of a huge monetary investment.

    To take myself as an example.
    I have well over $35,000 invested into my Canon set up.
    Multiple camera bodies, glass ranging from 14mm to 600mm, with a multitude of accessories.

    Would I love to change to Nikon and take advantage of the new low noise and low light capabilities? you betcha, Yes I would, can I afford to?

    Not unless I’m willing to take a loss on the equipment I have now.

    I couldn’t replace my gear one for one from Canon to Nikon, without putting out a considerable amount of cash. So I stick with the brand I’m currently with, because it’s an easier monetary choice. I can upgrade bodies, knowing my lenses will work. I can upgrade lenses knowing that they’ll work with my current bodies, along with strobes, remotes, and all the other multitude of accessories that I currently own.

    So yes I become a little more loyal to my current brand.

    I like many other users out there can’t afford to switch back and forth between brands, as new technological advancements are instituted between brands. It’s not cost effective, and if photography is your primary business, and not a hobby, it’s detrimental to your bottom line.

    Just taking a look from the business side of things.

  167. how true this is and thanks scott for saying it. most of us amateurs really get stuck in a photo brand system due too its cost. i am a loyal canon user for two reasons, 1. its the camera that fits my need and style as a photographer and 2. now that i have made the investment i am stuck here. this is not a bad thing, but with lens and flashes and all the little things i am here to stay and play until i am truly ready with cash. whatever the next system that will fit my needs will be the one i buy when the time comes. you couldn’t have said it better-it is the eye and skill of the photographer then the tool that makes the image.

  168. how true this is and thanks scott for saying it. most of us amateurs really get stuck in a photo brand system due too its cost. i am a loyal canon user for two reasons, 1. its the camera that fits my need and style as a photographer and 2. now that i have made the investment i am stuck here. this is not a bad thing, but with lens and flashes and all the little things i am here to stay and play until i am truly ready with cash. whatever the next system that will fit my needs will be the one i buy when the time comes. you couldn’t have said it better-it is the eye and skill of the photographer then the tool that makes the image.

  169. [...] with creativity.  Use what canvas you are accustomed to but never get too comfortable and “FEAR” the other parchments out there.  You never know when that additional knowledge is going to [...]

  170. The same goes for religion and politics so why not camera brands ;)

  171. The same goes for religion and politics so why not camera brands ;)

  172. Scott I do agree with you…
    I have owned many different brands of cameras over the years. From a Canon TX to a Hasselblad, it just depended on the job at hand.
    I must tell you though, my second camera was a Olympus OM-1. I was in high school and I did not buy it because it took a motor drive or was light weight. I bought it because Sheryl Tiegs looked great in the advertisements and in a bikini. (Yes, I was a typical male teen)
    I still use the OM! (Film) even after almost 30 years, It is a great camera to use when I know a digital camera is at risk in the environment I am shooting.
    A camera is a tool just like a screwdriver from Craftsman or Snap-On.

  173. Scott I do agree with you…
    I have owned many different brands of cameras over the years. From a Canon TX to a Hasselblad, it just depended on the job at hand.
    I must tell you though, my second camera was a Olympus OM-1. I was in high school and I did not buy it because it took a motor drive or was light weight. I bought it because Sheryl Tiegs looked great in the advertisements and in a bikini. (Yes, I was a typical male teen)
    I still use the OM! (Film) even after almost 30 years, It is a great camera to use when I know a digital camera is at risk in the environment I am shooting.
    A camera is a tool just like a screwdriver from Craftsman or Snap-On.

  174. Outstanding. Your “something we can do” is right on. When I bought my first DSLR in late 2006, it was a Nikon because I had a Nikon in the early 80s that was a great camera. After buying some Nikkor lenses, the die was cast. I didn’t have a clue how far Canon had come over the years. I’m one of those who couldn’t afford to switch even I wanted to. We people online start fulminating, I just move on. I could care less about these heated battles. Except, and this is important, I think that we all benefit from the competition.

  175. Outstanding. Your “something we can do” is right on. When I bought my first DSLR in late 2006, it was a Nikon because I had a Nikon in the early 80s that was a great camera. After buying some Nikkor lenses, the die was cast. I didn’t have a clue how far Canon had come over the years. I’m one of those who couldn’t afford to switch even I wanted to. We people online start fulminating, I just move on. I could care less about these heated battles. Except, and this is important, I think that we all benefit from the competition.

  176. I meant “When people online …)

  177. I meant “When people online …)

  178. @ fiddlergene
    Well, I understand your point and his comment was a beauty. But, just to stand up for what I believe in: Itzhak Perlman has already taken the mantle from dear old Jascha Heifetz, and Hilary Hahn is already set to take it from Perlman. You know what, like the camera wars, they can hand the mantle around, that is fine. We want cameras to get better like we want the violinists to get better. I am glad that Nikon stepped up to canon and has taken over (for some) at this point and I am sure canon or someone else will strike back soon. If there is no one to step up and take over, then the technology will not progress, just like there would be no violinists to keep the traditions.

  179. @ fiddlergene
    Well, I understand your point and his comment was a beauty. But, just to stand up for what I believe in: Itzhak Perlman has already taken the mantle from dear old Jascha Heifetz, and Hilary Hahn is already set to take it from Perlman. You know what, like the camera wars, they can hand the mantle around, that is fine. We want cameras to get better like we want the violinists to get better. I am glad that Nikon stepped up to canon and has taken over (for some) at this point and I am sure canon or someone else will strike back soon. If there is no one to step up and take over, then the technology will not progress, just like there would be no violinists to keep the traditions.

  180. It is interesting how folks that are so passionate about one brand or an other rarely talk about the specific application. Like when Scott went to the D3 my guess is it had more to do with the D3 being the best choice for his application, not the best choice for everyone all the time.

    I am a musician, and it is very common in my world for guys who lack skills to make up for the deficit in expensive gear, or a particular brand gear. A very similar phenomenon as the brand wars.

  181. @Scott
    Sorry. I did meant to bash Nikon or any other vendor. For me it is not brand loyalty as much as ‘financial commitment’. As I think you will agree, switching brands is not emotional. It’s expensive. I’m disappointed that I cannot buy a hi-res FX Nikon to that meets my current requirements and continues to rationalize my investment in other Nikon equipment. I suppose I would have said the same about Canon until the introduction of the 5D MkII.

    Anyway, great topic. Just look at the number of comments!

  182. @Scott
    Sorry. I did meant to bash Nikon or any other vendor. For me it is not brand loyalty as much as ‘financial commitment’. As I think you will agree, switching brands is not emotional. It’s expensive. I’m disappointed that I cannot buy a hi-res FX Nikon to that meets my current requirements and continues to rationalize my investment in other Nikon equipment. I suppose I would have said the same about Canon until the introduction of the 5D MkII.

    Anyway, great topic. Just look at the number of comments!

  183. @Tony Leon – so would you use your lack of funds to change brands as an excuse to attack someone else who did switch? If not, then I think your statement doesn’t really fit within the context of what I am sharing. Again – you can tie that to fear along the lines of what I said earlier. Whether it’s fear that’s justified or not, it’s still fear and that’s all I wanted to get across.

  184. @Tony Leon – so would you use your lack of funds to change brands as an excuse to attack someone else who did switch? If not, then I think your statement doesn’t really fit within the context of what I am sharing. Again – you can tie that to fear along the lines of what I said earlier. Whether it’s fear that’s justified or not, it’s still fear and that’s all I wanted to get across.

  185. I am with you Scott. I shoot with the Sonly Alpha series, and kind of sick of people telling me how I should switch to Nikon or whatever. Hey, it’s the photographer who shoots the pictures, not the camera.

  186. Hi Scott

    I just wanted to say, well said. I work in a semi pro camera shop in my area, and I see this sort of argument all the the time in the shop. One of my friends is a Canon user, and I am a Nikon user (of sorts, I have Nikon glass, but use Fuji bodies), and to break it down even further, he is a PC user and I am a Mac user… And much like you and Fred were like on the show, we joked about our brands being better than the other one, but in the end we both knew that we were just razing each other, and that it held no real meaning.

    I picked Nikon ’cause my parents used Nikon, and when I was just starting out, that meant that I got to use their lenses. Just like when he got started, his grandfather used Canon, and it was much the same reason for him.

    Switching back and forth to get something a little better than everyone else for a couple months is just stupid. And I have a customer like that, every time someone comes up with the latest and greatest, he jumps ship, and switches. And over the 6 years I have worked in the store, I can’t even tell you how many times he has switched.

    I can not believe that so many people take this dogmatic point of view on their camera brands and other things related to it; it just seems asinine to me.

    Anyway, thank you all for putting on a great show week after week. I listen to it on my bus ride to work every week, and I always look forward to the latest installment.

    Cheers and best wishes for a wonderful Christmas

    John R.

  187. Hi Scott

    I just wanted to say, well said. I work in a semi pro camera shop in my area, and I see this sort of argument all the the time in the shop. One of my friends is a Canon user, and I am a Nikon user (of sorts, I have Nikon glass, but use Fuji bodies), and to break it down even further, he is a PC user and I am a Mac user… And much like you and Fred were like on the show, we joked about our brands being better than the other one, but in the end we both knew that we were just razing each other, and that it held no real meaning.

    I picked Nikon ’cause my parents used Nikon, and when I was just starting out, that meant that I got to use their lenses. Just like when he got started, his grandfather used Canon, and it was much the same reason for him.

    Switching back and forth to get something a little better than everyone else for a couple months is just stupid. And I have a customer like that, every time someone comes up with the latest and greatest, he jumps ship, and switches. And over the 6 years I have worked in the store, I can’t even tell you how many times he has switched.

    I can not believe that so many people take this dogmatic point of view on their camera brands and other things related to it; it just seems asinine to me.

    Anyway, thank you all for putting on a great show week after week. I listen to it on my bus ride to work every week, and I always look forward to the latest installment.

    Cheers and best wishes for a wonderful Christmas

    John R.

  188. Well Said. I love your logic Scott, I don’t have a Canon or a Nikon, but even if I did my photos would still be my photos, a few good, many average, some bad, oh I deleted them, but still mine and learning.

    The same is with bikes and cars. My work bike is still free and attached to a fuel card. A bit off the subject, but I will one day get a good photo of it. Still trying to work out how whilst I am riding it.

    Scott and gang, keep up the great site and netcast, a little Leo Laporte there.

  189. Well Said. I love your logic Scott, I don’t have a Canon or a Nikon, but even if I did my photos would still be my photos, a few good, many average, some bad, oh I deleted them, but still mine and learning.

    The same is with bikes and cars. My work bike is still free and attached to a fuel card. A bit off the subject, but I will one day get a good photo of it. Still trying to work out how whilst I am riding it.

    Scott and gang, keep up the great site and netcast, a little Leo Laporte there.

  190. (I have not read all of the comments)
    I think an additional reason is that some people feel the need to be superior, cognitively or materially. Being a staunch supporter of one brand allows a person the opportunity to be both cognitively superior (“I know gear better than you do”) AND materially superior (“A is better than B, I own A, you own B”). I have witnessed this numerous times on the internet with my own purchases. I researched for quite a while and decided that, for me, the Nikon D40 would be my first foray into the DSLR world. What I find now is that when I ask questions on the internet about it, the responses tend to be “That camera stinks!” or something similar, rather than trying to be helpful and ask a newbie a question.
    Thanks for the great post(s), Scott. A thanks to your many friends as well.

  191. (I have not read all of the comments)
    I think an additional reason is that some people feel the need to be superior, cognitively or materially. Being a staunch supporter of one brand allows a person the opportunity to be both cognitively superior (“I know gear better than you do”) AND materially superior (“A is better than B, I own A, you own B”). I have witnessed this numerous times on the internet with my own purchases. I researched for quite a while and decided that, for me, the Nikon D40 would be my first foray into the DSLR world. What I find now is that when I ask questions on the internet about it, the responses tend to be “That camera stinks!” or something similar, rather than trying to be helpful and ask a newbie a question.
    Thanks for the great post(s), Scott. A thanks to your many friends as well.

  192. (With 103 comments I have not read them all either)
    All I have to day is, BRAVO!!! I am an IT professional working for a school district and I get slack for switching from Windows to Mac from my co-workers. I tell them it is a personal choice. Same applies to my camera equipment. I too would switch equipment if it met my needs. It’s just a piece hardware.

    I have seen amazing photos comes from Canon, Nikon, Sony, and so many brands of cameras. A photographer makes the photograph not the equipment. I have come to realize that a point and shot can take just as good a photo as my DSLR.

    If you are single minded and not open to the possibilities of other brands then you limit yourself to the possibility of becoming a good or even great photographer.

  193. (With 103 comments I have not read them all either)
    All I have to day is, BRAVO!!! I am an IT professional working for a school district and I get slack for switching from Windows to Mac from my co-workers. I tell them it is a personal choice. Same applies to my camera equipment. I too would switch equipment if it met my needs. It’s just a piece hardware.

    I have seen amazing photos comes from Canon, Nikon, Sony, and so many brands of cameras. A photographer makes the photograph not the equipment. I have come to realize that a point and shot can take just as good a photo as my DSLR.

    If you are single minded and not open to the possibilities of other brands then you limit yourself to the possibility of becoming a good or even great photographer.

  194. Great post! Couldn’t agree more….

    I’m a Nikon person, due to owning Nikon for a long time. Its just comfort level and it makes sense to reuse the equipment.

    However, in office, I’m surrounded by ALL Canon shooters. Most are just “brand chasing” in my opinion, but do not know really how to use them to the best of their capabilities..

    Sometimes the bashings coming towards me is really unbearable.. haha

    Its like this, when you show a good shot and get it nicely printed out or displayed, the chaps will most likely say “wow.. nice camera, what brand is it?”

    Darn, camera does not walk around and compose for a good shot. Its you and me.

    I am trying very hard to stay away from brand bashing..etc.. by saying this:
    “Take a good pic and show.. even with a Casio camera.. miracles can happen”

    But then.. almost always “Casio? Nah.. not good enough… should get……”
    Sigh…. Its a nice “hope”.. but I think being humans who love comparing… don’t think Santa will grant it any time soon..

    Anyway.. Merry Chrismas and Happy New Year!

  195. Great post! Couldn’t agree more….

    I’m a Nikon person, due to owning Nikon for a long time. Its just comfort level and it makes sense to reuse the equipment.

    However, in office, I’m surrounded by ALL Canon shooters. Most are just “brand chasing” in my opinion, but do not know really how to use them to the best of their capabilities..

    Sometimes the bashings coming towards me is really unbearable.. haha

    Its like this, when you show a good shot and get it nicely printed out or displayed, the chaps will most likely say “wow.. nice camera, what brand is it?”

    Darn, camera does not walk around and compose for a good shot. Its you and me.

    I am trying very hard to stay away from brand bashing..etc.. by saying this:
    “Take a good pic and show.. even with a Casio camera.. miracles can happen”

    But then.. almost always “Casio? Nah.. not good enough… should get……”
    Sigh…. Its a nice “hope”.. but I think being humans who love comparing… don’t think Santa will grant it any time soon..

    Anyway.. Merry Chrismas and Happy New Year!

  196. Brand wars give the simple-minded of this world a way to express their ignorant, insignificant thoughts.

    But what I do hat is when I go into a ‘techy’ store (not many good big camera stores around these days) and I ask if they have any Nikon lens, speedlight etc. and the person there says “no, but we do have some Sony lenses and some Canon flashguns in” : BUFFOONS! Why on earth would I want to even try to put those on a NIKON body? Eugh?

  197. Brand wars give the simple-minded of this world a way to express their ignorant, insignificant thoughts.

    But what I do hat is when I go into a ‘techy’ store (not many good big camera stores around these days) and I ask if they have any Nikon lens, speedlight etc. and the person there says “no, but we do have some Sony lenses and some Canon flashguns in” : BUFFOONS! Why on earth would I want to even try to put those on a NIKON body? Eugh?

  198. Scott, I could not agree more with your comments. Sometimes I think it’s like politics and the lack of independent thinkers, which I also believe is bred out of fear and not free thought. I just upgraded my XTi to a 5D MkII and love it, but before I did I heavily considered the D700, I did not have a big investment in lenses so it was a valid thought. I made my choice on the Canon as it did what I wanted and had features I wanted to try and learn and become more creative with. Anyway another great post and right on the money by my thinking. I also find it very sad that people have to inflict their choices on others based on death threats. Wow, what a democracy.

    P.S. Love the Cranes in the Fire Mist.

  199. Scott, I could not agree more with your comments. Sometimes I think it’s like politics and the lack of independent thinkers, which I also believe is bred out of fear and not free thought. I just upgraded my XTi to a 5D MkII and love it, but before I did I heavily considered the D700, I did not have a big investment in lenses so it was a valid thought. I made my choice on the Canon as it did what I wanted and had features I wanted to try and learn and become more creative with. Anyway another great post and right on the money by my thinking. I also find it very sad that people have to inflict their choices on others based on death threats. Wow, what a democracy.

    P.S. Love the Cranes in the Fire Mist.

  200. Great article Scott. Death threats ? Gotta be kidding me. BTW you might want to ask them if they were planning on using a Winchester or Remington rifle. One is capable of leaving a much tighter group of shots than the other but then again that could be another article for a new podcast – TWIS.

  201. Great article Scott. Death threats ? Gotta be kidding me. BTW you might want to ask them if they were planning on using a Winchester or Remington rifle. One is capable of leaving a much tighter group of shots than the other but then again that could be another article for a new podcast – TWIS.

  202. I think people just like being in a “gang” or “club”, they just want to belong and be loved.

    Personally I am with you. The only reason i don’t switch is an investment in gear.

  203. I think people just like being in a “gang” or “club”, they just want to belong and be loved.

    Personally I am with you. The only reason i don’t switch is an investment in gear.

  204. Scott

    You hit the “nail on the head”! The camera is just a tool used to capture an image. Nothing more, nothing less. Tell me how, just by looking at the photographs alone, one can determine what camera is used to shoot any picture in a major magazine like National Geographic. You can’t. So everyone needs to get over the brand prejudice and get on with life. By the way, Nikon rules, Canon drools!!! L.O.L

  205. [...] Bourne over at TWIP posted on brand loyalty and the reasons behind it.  I would slightly disagree on terminology with him, what he’s [...]

  206. I see this debate raging every weekend while I’m out shooting wildlife. It all starts innocently enough with some mention of some blog post or something they saw on dpreview or some other site and before long you have a heated discussion about what are essentially “tools” and nothing more. Meanwhile, as the debate rages on, there are actual photographic opportunities that are being missed because they are too busy shooting the crap about camera gear.

    I shoot Nikon but it’s just a tool and I have lenses and flashes for that particular tool. It’s a tool and nothing more. If Cannon or Pentax or Olympus or Fuji or Sigma or whoever comes out with something more interesting I will weight the pluses and minuses, check my bank account and inevitably go find something interesting to shoot instead of driving my blood pressure up over things that have no real relevance to photography as an art.

    There are some great photographers taking a giant step backward every now and then and building a pinhole camera or shooting B & W on old film bodies or doing Polaroids or whatever. The key is they are DOING photography and not talking about doing photography and those are the photographers I have the most respect for.

  207. Scott, when you’re right, you’re right. this is just an extension, or maybe another example of the intolerance people have of other peoples right to have their own opinions. This extends to cars, religions, politics, and lifestyle. Well Done. I proudly put my name on my comments.

  208. Scott, when you’re right, you’re right. this is just an extension, or maybe another example of the intolerance people have of other peoples right to have their own opinions. This extends to cars, religions, politics, and lifestyle. Well Done. I proudly put my name on my comments.

  209. Scott
    I agree with Ingersoll you really hit the nail on the head. However, you really should really have used a Sti***to Ti***e, it has a 15 ounce milled face, it is all titanium, with a 180-degree side …

  210. Scott
    I agree with Ingersoll you really hit the nail on the head. However, you really should really have used a Sti***to Ti***e, it has a 15 ounce milled face, it is all titanium, with a 180-degree side …

  211. Ha, Ha, I totally agree. It’s just tools for your toolbox. I’m a Nikon user & my loyalty lies in years of collecting lenses. I couldn’t justify switching bodies to Canon then having to switch all those lenses – ouch!
    I’m laughing because i work for LVMH – wines & spirits. The psychology of Champagne brand loyalty and the willingness for a consumer to spend that much more on one of our brands.
    Or Grey Goose vs Belvedere Vodka…Tell an American that GG is made in France and it’s enough for them to switch to Belvedere!!!
    Tools to do the job you want. That’s all it is.

  212. Ha, Ha, I totally agree. It’s just tools for your toolbox. I’m a Nikon user & my loyalty lies in years of collecting lenses. I couldn’t justify switching bodies to Canon then having to switch all those lenses – ouch!
    I’m laughing because i work for LVMH – wines & spirits. The psychology of Champagne brand loyalty and the willingness for a consumer to spend that much more on one of our brands.
    Or Grey Goose vs Belvedere Vodka…Tell an American that GG is made in France and it’s enough for them to switch to Belvedere!!!
    Tools to do the job you want. That’s all it is.

  213. This must be a record for the number of reactions posted.
    Oh for a Canon/Nikon mount adapter that could utilize the lens/camera technology of the other so that the body choice wasn’t so driven by investment in lenses. Merry Christmas

  214. This must be a record for the number of reactions posted.
    Oh for a Canon/Nikon mount adapter that could utilize the lens/camera technology of the other so that the body choice wasn’t so driven by investment in lenses. Merry Christmas

  215. Thanks Scott! This really needed saying. I wish a few people I know at my local camera club would take notice of this. Very nice analysis. Best wishes for the season everyone!

  216. Thanks Scott! This really needed saying. I wish a few people I know at my local camera club would take notice of this. Very nice analysis. Best wishes for the season everyone!

  217. Without reading the 116 comments that came before mine, I just want to say Well Said Scott!

  218. Without reading the 116 comments that came before mine, I just want to say Well Said Scott!

  219. I fully agree with you Scott. I am afraid that I made the wrong decision, because the compeditor released a better camera in the same price range only a month after I bought my camera. However, I engage in brand wars simply because it’s fun. I enjoy debating with people, so long as it’s friendly. Me and my photography friends debate canon/nikon constantly, but that never stops us from reaching across the table and trying out the other brand and admiring equipment.

  220. Great article! I only own a compact camera and it’s not Canon or Nikon, so I’ll start off by saying sorry for reading the article ;).

    I don’t know much about this debate, but I couldn’t help thinking if it might have something to do with the camera controls. If the controls and interface of the cameras are very different, then people might fear that they have to learn that all over again if they switch to another brand.

    Just a thought…

    Merry Christmas

  221. Great article! I only own a compact camera and it’s not Canon or Nikon, so I’ll start off by saying sorry for reading the article ;).

    I don’t know much about this debate, but I couldn’t help thinking if it might have something to do with the camera controls. If the controls and interface of the cameras are very different, then people might fear that they have to learn that all over again if they switch to another brand.

    Just a thought…

    Merry Christmas

  222. Good article Scott. But as hinted at in earlier comments, perhaps this is a universal problem with the human psyche. We fear that which is different from our own experience or choice. You can observe the same “fears” at work in religion, politics, consumerism, choice of weight-loss diet, cult movies etc.

    Choice of cameras is simply another way for people to differentiate themselves into tribes.

    At the root of most of mankind’s troubles we find tribalism. The Canon tribe is “different” from the Nikon tribe which is different from the Pentax tribe etc. Why should photography be different from any other form of tribalism?

  223. Good article Scott. But as hinted at in earlier comments, perhaps this is a universal problem with the human psyche. We fear that which is different from our own experience or choice. You can observe the same “fears” at work in religion, politics, consumerism, choice of weight-loss diet, cult movies etc.

    Choice of cameras is simply another way for people to differentiate themselves into tribes.

    At the root of most of mankind’s troubles we find tribalism. The Canon tribe is “different” from the Nikon tribe which is different from the Pentax tribe etc. Why should photography be different from any other form of tribalism?

  224. Someone once told me of a talk he gave on photography. He showed a cheap, simple camera and an expensive SLR (I’m talking of pre-digital days). Then he showed a bunch of good photos taken with the cheap camera and some poor photos taken with the SLR. Everyone assumed the good photos came from the expensive camera.

    His point was that a photograph is created between your ears, not in the camera.

  225. Someone once told me of a talk he gave on photography. He showed a cheap, simple camera and an expensive SLR (I’m talking of pre-digital days). Then he showed a bunch of good photos taken with the cheap camera and some poor photos taken with the SLR. Everyone assumed the good photos came from the expensive camera.

    His point was that a photograph is created between your ears, not in the camera.

  226. Sigh…

    Clearly words written by a man who hasn’t had to make that gut wrenching decision of buying a 1000+ SLR knowing you wont be able to change bodies for years and any spare change will have to go to lens. (at least not for many years now)

    It’s all part of the Psycho-Emotional justification for spending that money that really should have went to life insurance or finding out just what that darn noise under the hood is.

    BTW – I’m Nikon evangelist “the D700″ the one camera to rule them all!

    Enjoy those black dots you canon zealots!

    Much love,
    C.C.

  227. Sigh…

    Clearly words written by a man who hasn’t had to make that gut wrenching decision of buying a 1000+ SLR knowing you wont be able to change bodies for years and any spare change will have to go to lens. (at least not for many years now)

    It’s all part of the Psycho-Emotional justification for spending that money that really should have went to life insurance or finding out just what that darn noise under the hood is.

    BTW – I’m Nikon evangelist “the D700″ the one camera to rule them all!

    Enjoy those black dots you canon zealots!

    Much love,
    C.C.

  228. Love the topic of this post. Another version of this topic that bugs me is , ” Hey nice picture, you must have a good camera.”
    I bought my first SLR when I was in the Army. The only brand the PX had at that time was Canon, so I’m a Canon shooter. Later I was able to buy a Leica Cl from a photographer for 350 bucks, when that little camera sold used for 800 bucks….so now I have a Leica. The story goes on in a similar fashion. I have various “brands” due to finding deals too good to pass up.
    Never has brand stood in the way, I honestly couldn’t care less what brand I use as long as it works.

    There is a special place in Dante’s Inferno for the brand Zealots….it’s right along side the pixel peepers:)

    Rex

  229. Ahah you’re right Scott! I had reached the same conclusion.
    And I guess when you reach the point that you can afford to switch brands just because one is temporarily superior, then the fear disappears :)

  230. @Mau whether or not I (or anyone else) has the resources to switch is not the point. The point is that recognizing the fact that fear is the motivator helps put things in perspective.

  231. @Mau whether or not I (or anyone else) has the resources to switch is not the point. The point is that recognizing the fact that fear is the motivator helps put things in perspective.

  232. Very funny, and so true – fear is a powerful thing – Bruce Springsteen.

    It is worth adding that many pros get a big camera because they fear ‘size matters’ question. I have taken great delight in using camera’s those pro’s would not use, even when photographing the big pro’s… As you describe, there are many types of hammer, use the right one for the task in hand!

    Thank you, gave me a great smile!

    Vic…

  233. Very funny, and so true – fear is a powerful thing – Bruce Springsteen.

    It is worth adding that many pros get a big camera because they fear ‘size matters’ question. I have taken great delight in using camera’s those pro’s would not use, even when photographing the big pro’s… As you describe, there are many types of hammer, use the right one for the task in hand!

    Thank you, gave me a great smile!

    Vic…

  234. Scott, as someone who has a minor in graphic design and photography and does some paid work on the side (when I’m not teaching speech and debate to high schoolers), I appreciate not only the content but also the sub-text of this article. I see my students get caught-up in the very same type of conflicts that you talk about, and with the same over-the-top voracity. All to often we allow ourselves to be defined by what we have, and not what we do.

    As someone who has shot a great deal with many different brands (my film gear is totally different from my digital gear, and the gear my university used was different still), I appreciate your focus in this post on the fact that you could get that great shot with any of a number of different brands, cameras, or systems. I also want to extend a thanks to the whole crew at TWIP for giving us ideas and techniques that we can use, regardless of if we have the “right” gear or not; it is one of the things that keeps TWIP on my iPod each week.

  235. Scott, as someone who has a minor in graphic design and photography and does some paid work on the side (when I’m not teaching speech and debate to high schoolers), I appreciate not only the content but also the sub-text of this article. I see my students get caught-up in the very same type of conflicts that you talk about, and with the same over-the-top voracity. All to often we allow ourselves to be defined by what we have, and not what we do.

    As someone who has shot a great deal with many different brands (my film gear is totally different from my digital gear, and the gear my university used was different still), I appreciate your focus in this post on the fact that you could get that great shot with any of a number of different brands, cameras, or systems. I also want to extend a thanks to the whole crew at TWIP for giving us ideas and techniques that we can use, regardless of if we have the “right” gear or not; it is one of the things that keeps TWIP on my iPod each week.

  236. Couldn’t agree more with the sentiment Scott. Well put and its this clear, lucid, unbiased and straight thinking and talking that keeps me glued to the podcast weekly. And not only that, I am not a Canon OR a Nikon user, but a Pentax and they NEVER get a mention! ;-) But on a more serious point, the brand to me was not in any way important. What was at the time of buying the camera was experience of previous Pentax film cameras (which I guess, if you extrapolate, could be put down to the fear of change) and cost. On a tight budget and reading and researching the reviews, as well as seeking out the bargains, the Pentax gave me the best bang for my buck (the Pound over here in Blighty!). On reflection, regarding the amount of coverage that Canon and Nikon get in the press and so on, I sometimes regret my decision as there are many more informational resources on these two brands than there are on Pentax, but I am more than happy with my purchase. I would be happy to move to Nikon or Canon, or any other brand for that matter if the camera provided me with a significant amount more than my current camera, but primarily, I am the one taking the shots. If I don’t know about the rule of thirds, lighting, composure, quirky angles, landscaping, photoshop etc etc………then the camera may as well be a 20 year old Praktica point and shoot for all its worth!

    Well said Scott, keep up the good work and keep talking straight!

  237. Couldn’t agree more with the sentiment Scott. Well put and its this clear, lucid, unbiased and straight thinking and talking that keeps me glued to the podcast weekly. And not only that, I am not a Canon OR a Nikon user, but a Pentax and they NEVER get a mention! ;-) But on a more serious point, the brand to me was not in any way important. What was at the time of buying the camera was experience of previous Pentax film cameras (which I guess, if you extrapolate, could be put down to the fear of change) and cost. On a tight budget and reading and researching the reviews, as well as seeking out the bargains, the Pentax gave me the best bang for my buck (the Pound over here in Blighty!). On reflection, regarding the amount of coverage that Canon and Nikon get in the press and so on, I sometimes regret my decision as there are many more informational resources on these two brands than there are on Pentax, but I am more than happy with my purchase. I would be happy to move to Nikon or Canon, or any other brand for that matter if the camera provided me with a significant amount more than my current camera, but primarily, I am the one taking the shots. If I don’t know about the rule of thirds, lighting, composure, quirky angles, landscaping, photoshop etc etc………then the camera may as well be a 20 year old Praktica point and shoot for all its worth!

    Well said Scott, keep up the good work and keep talking straight!

  238. I own a finepix right now and am completely satisfied, for my budget that is. I used to own a Nikon, excellent brand. I used someone else’s Canon, beautiful.

    My personal preference is optical zoom and Nikon has a 20 something zoom now. I’d love it but can’t work it into my budget. My fujifilm has 18x optical zoom, it’s sweet.

    Anyways, apart from zoom, any good photographer can mainipulate his camera for optimal, lovely pics. If he/she can’t, it’s not the camera’s fault, it’s the person behind it.

  239. I own a finepix right now and am completely satisfied, for my budget that is. I used to own a Nikon, excellent brand. I used someone else’s Canon, beautiful.

    My personal preference is optical zoom and Nikon has a 20 something zoom now. I’d love it but can’t work it into my budget. My fujifilm has 18x optical zoom, it’s sweet.

    Anyways, apart from zoom, any good photographer can mainipulate his camera for optimal, lovely pics. If he/she can’t, it’s not the camera’s fault, it’s the person behind it.

  240. [...] and the likes of it, and there’s this piece I found really meaningful and I just wanna share: The reason people go into (camera) brand wars. It invoked certain thoughts and feelings towards the notion and some other stuffs, and I think [...]

  241. [...] Photography, Public Service Announcements, R/C, Video games Scott Bourne over at TWIP posted on brand loyalty and the reasons behind it.  I would slightly disagree on terminology with him, what he’s [...]

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