October 11, 2008

50 Makes a Comeback

I just looked at data from Amazon. Three out of the top ten selling lenses are 50mm lenses (Canon EF 50 F/1.8 – Nikon 50 F.1.8D, and Canon 50 F/1.4 USM. One additional zoom (18-200 Nikon F/3.5-5.6 DX VR) also covers that focal range and two more lenses, the Canon 55-250 F/4-5.6 IS and the Nikon 55-200 F/4-5.6 come real darn close.

It’s interesting to see this trend since 15 years ago, most people wouldn’t be caught dead shooting at 50mm.

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Join the conversation! 83 Comments

  1. Formidable optical qualities compare to zooms, fast, cheap and with modern day multi-MP cameras easy to crop, most of all transportable and easy to use (no zooming to do).

    Reply
  2. Formidable optical qualities compare to zooms, fast, cheap and with modern day multi-MP cameras easy to crop, most of all transportable and easy to use (no zooming to do).

    Reply
  3. Why were 50mm lenses so unpopular 15 years ago?

    Reply
  4. Well, the ideal portrait lens would be an 85mm Prime on a FF camera, correct? (Editor’s Note: Not correct. There is no ideal portrait lens. If you shoot fashion, the ideal portrait lens is 200 to 300mm in focal length. If you shoot weddings – probably 100mm.)

    Therefore, in theory, the 50mm make since on 1.5x-1.6x crop sensors which are equivalent to 75-80mm. I own the 50mm f/1.4 on a crop sensor and LOVE it, especially manually focused utilizing LiveView magnified with a wide aperture to employ that creamy, buttery bokeh. When I purchase the FF DSLR, I can’t how I would use that 50mm (essentially a 30mm equivalent [crop sensor]) for portraiture. In this respect, I would have to agree with the mentality of “not being caught dead” shooting at 50mm.

    Reply
  5. Well, the ideal portrait lens would be an 85mm Prime on a FF camera, correct? (Editor’s Note: Not correct. There is no ideal portrait lens. If you shoot fashion, the ideal portrait lens is 200 to 300mm in focal length. If you shoot weddings – probably 100mm.)

    Therefore, in theory, the 50mm make since on 1.5x-1.6x crop sensors which are equivalent to 75-80mm. I own the 50mm f/1.4 on a crop sensor and LOVE it, especially manually focused utilizing LiveView magnified with a wide aperture to employ that creamy, buttery bokeh. When I purchase the FF DSLR, I can’t how I would use that 50mm (essentially a 30mm equivalent [crop sensor]) for portraiture. In this respect, I would have to agree with the mentality of “not being caught dead” shooting at 50mm.

    Reply
  6. I picked up the Canon 50mm f/1.8 for €70 shortly after getting my first DSLR and was amazed by the results. Given the minuscule price tag I think every Canon shooter on a budget should have one!

    Reply
  7. I bought the Canon 50/1.8 a couple of years ago for my 30D. I have some L zooms, but on a crop sensor, its a nice, reasonably sharp 80mm (effective) portrait lens. It is also faster than any zoom I own, so its nice for low-light situations. And its light. So if you’re on a budget and you just bought your first DSLR, it seems like a no-brainer for $90. Think about that – an f1.8 for $90!

    Reply
  8. I bought the Canon 50/1.8 a couple of years ago for my 30D. I have some L zooms, but on a crop sensor, its a nice, reasonably sharp 80mm (effective) portrait lens. It is also faster than any zoom I own, so its nice for low-light situations. And its light. So if you’re on a budget and you just bought your first DSLR, it seems like a no-brainer for $90. Think about that – an f1.8 for $90!

    Reply
  9. Does it count that a lot of people are actually buying an 80mm lens, what with all the crop sensor cameras?

    Reply
  10. Does it count that a lot of people are actually buying an 80mm lens, what with all the crop sensor cameras?

    Reply
  11. It seems the updated Nikon 50 f/1.4 should be on the list. The 1.8s have pretty darn good image quality for the price. There aren’t many lenses available with nearly that wide of an aperture at a price affordable to newcomers.

    Reply
  12. It seems the updated Nikon 50 f/1.4 should be on the list. The 1.8s have pretty darn good image quality for the price. There aren’t many lenses available with nearly that wide of an aperture at a price affordable to newcomers.

    Reply
  13. With such a shallow depth of field it quite simple to create a nice bokeh effect. I have found that when people are wanting to take better pictures… it is this bokeh effect that they are looking for and thats why I steer people to get a 50mm.

    Reply
  14. Then there’s the Sigma 50/1.4…

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  15. Then there’s the Sigma 50/1.4…

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  16. And the Sigma 50 f/1.4 is $500. Not an easy way to be a “Top 10″ selling lens. However, I see Nikon, Canon, Sony/Minolta & Zeiss “upgrading” to the newer technologies Sigma brings to the market. That opinion is in line with Phil Askey and many others….

    Reply
  17. This post is about 50 mm lenses making a comeback and which ones are hot sellers on Amazon. Nothing here about which is the best lens.

    Reply
  18. This post is about 50 mm lenses making a comeback and which ones are hot sellers on Amazon. Nothing here about which is the best lens.

    Reply
  19. hell yeah.. I have 3 Nikon 50mm and love them all 50 1.8, 50 1.4, and a sweet 20 year old 50 1.2 AIs…

    Anyone that asks me what lens they should buy after they get that first Rebel or Dx0 (sub a 4,5,6,7,8, or 9 for the x) and I say get that $100 fixed 50mm. They rarely take it off either.

    Reply
  20. hell yeah.. I have 3 Nikon 50mm and love them all 50 1.8, 50 1.4, and a sweet 20 year old 50 1.2 AIs…

    Anyone that asks me what lens they should buy after they get that first Rebel or Dx0 (sub a 4,5,6,7,8, or 9 for the x) and I say get that $100 fixed 50mm. They rarely take it off either.

    Reply
  21. The Nikon 50mm 1.8 is a great value, focuses quickly and is very sharp since it is a prime lens. I love this lens, but the bokeh is “so-so”. Just because you have a wide lens does not great bokeh make, you also need the great glass and you’re not going to get that for $120. Now, Nikon’s 85mm 1.8D (which we have), THAT has lovely bokeh, but it’s also $400.

    Reply
  22. The Nikon 50mm 1.8 is a great value, focuses quickly and is very sharp since it is a prime lens. I love this lens, but the bokeh is “so-so”. Just because you have a wide lens does not great bokeh make, you also need the great glass and you’re not going to get that for $120. Now, Nikon’s 85mm 1.8D (which we have), THAT has lovely bokeh, but it’s also $400.

    Reply
  23. I just have to say I love my 50mm. Changed my life in photography, and it has become my primary lens. Nice and light, makes my DSLR almost downright protable; and takes amazing shots.

    Reply
  24. I just have to say I love my 50mm. Changed my life in photography, and it has become my primary lens. Nice and light, makes my DSLR almost downright protable; and takes amazing shots.

    Reply
  25. My 1.8 Canon is great. It is not as fast as my USM lenses and color is sometimes and issue too. Its Bokeh is not very nice either. It makes up for all that in sharpness though. I can fix all the other stuff on the computer, but having everything so sharp is great! To my understanding however, the 1.4 is a step up in quality and the pros who can afford the 1.2 also indicate it is a difference you have to see and shoot to realize.

    Reply
  26. My 1.8 Canon is great. It is not as fast as my USM lenses and color is sometimes and issue too. Its Bokeh is not very nice either. It makes up for all that in sharpness though. I can fix all the other stuff on the computer, but having everything so sharp is great! To my understanding however, the 1.4 is a step up in quality and the pros who can afford the 1.2 also indicate it is a difference you have to see and shoot to realize.

    Reply
  27. yep when i get my D700 ill be gettting the new nikon 1.4…..& let me be the surprising first to say.. nice shot of Liana Scott

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  28. yep when i get my D700 ill be gettting the new nikon 1.4…..& let me be the surprising first to say.. nice shot of Liana Scott

    Reply
  29. Many amateur / hobbyist photographers are using Pentax gear. For them, the whole Pentax heritage of 50mm lenses can be used on their film SLR and DSLR cameras (even the screw-mount Takumars via an adapter). For my Pentax DSLR, I picked up a very inexpensive Pentax-A 50mm f1.4 – these lenses, while manual focus, are superb and rate up there with the best. Wouldn’t worry too much about what’s best for portraits, etc – it really depends on the situation. But as a great all-round lens, a 50mm f1.4 is great.

    Reply
  30. Many amateur / hobbyist photographers are using Pentax gear. For them, the whole Pentax heritage of 50mm lenses can be used on their film SLR and DSLR cameras (even the screw-mount Takumars via an adapter). For my Pentax DSLR, I picked up a very inexpensive Pentax-A 50mm f1.4 – these lenses, while manual focus, are superb and rate up there with the best. Wouldn’t worry too much about what’s best for portraits, etc – it really depends on the situation. But as a great all-round lens, a 50mm f1.4 is great.

    Reply
  31. I am one of the ones who added to that number this year (Canon 50mm f1.4). I love the lens. Great low light, decent indoors for facial. Added the extension tubes and it turns into a great macro lens to boot…

    Reply
  32. I am one of the ones who added to that number this year (Canon 50mm f1.4). I love the lens. Great low light, decent indoors for facial. Added the extension tubes and it turns into a great macro lens to boot…

    Reply
  33. I’ve bought the Canon 50mm f1.2 about half a year ago and since then I enjoy it every day as a portrait lens. The DOF is amazing. Even a nono agrees that the unsharp background is beautiful.
    50mm is great for in house portrait photography.

    Reply
  34. I’ve bought the Canon 50mm f1.2 about half a year ago and since then I enjoy it every day as a portrait lens. The DOF is amazing. Even a nono agrees that the unsharp background is beautiful.
    50mm is great for in house portrait photography.

    Reply
  35. I opted for a 30mm Sigma with my cropped-sensor D40x. My primary reason was to have a fast lens for snapshots and photos of friends in our normal surroundings. At dinner parties, in the back yard around a fire, etc. If I had to wager a guess as to why the 50s and 30s are coming back like this now, I’d point at film. Rather, I can tell you without a doubt I bought mine because I no longer need film.

    It doesn’t cost me to take some candid shots of my friends while eating some barbecued flesh. With film, I would shoot this way as well, but could only usually afford one roll of film. I was also usually using the on-camera flash and not taking great photos. Of course I didn’t know as much about what I was doing then, otherwise I would’ve bought a 50mm and used that without any flash.

    The only way I learned was a little reading and a lot of shooting. I didn’t get back into photography until January this year when I bought my D40x, and found TWiP shortly thereafter (hooray!). In the first month of owning this camera, I took around 3,000 pictures. I took a trip to Hawaii and Japan, so I had lots of various subjects. While 4,000 is more than I would’ve taken at home in Minneapolis in February, it’s probably not far off. I’ve slowed down, but as I check my camera, I’ve taken 7,800 now. With film, that would’ve been around 325 rolls of film, plus development, call it maybe $4,000. In one year.

    Reply
  36. I love 50mm on my crop sensor and my full frame!

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  37. I love 50mm on my crop sensor and my full frame!

    Reply
  38. My Canon 50 1.4 lives on my camera, but let’s not forget that I’m sure fairly few of these 50′s are mounted on full-frame cameras. I’m sure the effective focal length of these very popular lenses is more like 80mm in most cases.

    Food for thought. I still love this focal length, and to be honest, it’s got me chomping at the bit to get a full frame to try it the way it was initially designed and to get it closer to that “human eye” experience.

    Reply
  39. I think the whole interest in the 50mm is the fact that you can purchase glass that is fast and very inexpensive. I am in the market right now for a 50mm myself. When I first started out I got the kit lens with the camera and it was ok to learn off of, but always seemed that a lens in the 2.0 or quicker was always way overpriced to be even remotely viable on an amateur budget. Especially if I had no clue on how good the images would look with it.

    With many on-line photo sharing websites, I have come to appreciate the quality that prime lenses offer. To the point that I have sworn off zoom lenses completely. I mean they are nice to scout with and learn with, but when you want an image to be incredibly sharp and have low to no CA thats when you want to use a prime lens. And I think that there might be a movement back to prime lenses especially with them being so much cheaper than zoom lenses. Not to mention that after a while I think people have developed a feel for the style they want to shoot.

    Now don’t get me wrong, I know theres very nice quality zoom lenses, but they ultimately come with a price especially when they are really fast.

    So the short answer I guess is that people just want fast glass at an inexpensive price point.

    Reply
  40. I think the whole interest in the 50mm is the fact that you can purchase glass that is fast and very inexpensive. I am in the market right now for a 50mm myself. When I first started out I got the kit lens with the camera and it was ok to learn off of, but always seemed that a lens in the 2.0 or quicker was always way overpriced to be even remotely viable on an amateur budget. Especially if I had no clue on how good the images would look with it.

    With many on-line photo sharing websites, I have come to appreciate the quality that prime lenses offer. To the point that I have sworn off zoom lenses completely. I mean they are nice to scout with and learn with, but when you want an image to be incredibly sharp and have low to no CA thats when you want to use a prime lens. And I think that there might be a movement back to prime lenses especially with them being so much cheaper than zoom lenses. Not to mention that after a while I think people have developed a feel for the style they want to shoot.

    Now don’t get me wrong, I know theres very nice quality zoom lenses, but they ultimately come with a price especially when they are really fast.

    So the short answer I guess is that people just want fast glass at an inexpensive price point.

    Reply
  41. My EF 50mm f/1.8 is my favourite lens. If I were to leave my home with only one lens, that would be my pick. It’s really sharp, fast and very light. Sure, it’s cheap and plastic, but the optical quality is second to none. I may replace it with an f/1.4, or maybe an f/1.2 if I’m suddenly rich, but I’ll always keep a 50mm by my side.

    Reply
  42. My EF 50mm f/1.8 is my favourite lens. If I were to leave my home with only one lens, that would be my pick. It’s really sharp, fast and very light. Sure, it’s cheap and plastic, but the optical quality is second to none. I may replace it with an f/1.4, or maybe an f/1.2 if I’m suddenly rich, but I’ll always keep a 50mm by my side.

    Reply
  43. I’m my loving my 50mm f/1.4 on my Pentax K10d. While the focal length certainly isn’t perfect in all situations, I find I use it at least 80% of the time. And at only $200 it provides great bang for the buck. Most zooms, until very expensive, are just too slow. This is especially true of kit lens.

    Reply
  44. I’m my loving my 50mm f/1.4 on my Pentax K10d. While the focal length certainly isn’t perfect in all situations, I find I use it at least 80% of the time. And at only $200 it provides great bang for the buck. Most zooms, until very expensive, are just too slow. This is especially true of kit lens.

    Reply
  45. The Canon 50 – f/1.4 was the first lens I bought after the kit. After that, a Lensbaby, but I digress. I found that the 50, because of it’s amazing DOF, is more versatile than some zooms that I have now. Top 10 makes sense. Compact, light weight, accurate, fast by design.

    Reply
  46. The canon 50 1.8 can be had for less than $100, for folks with rebel kit lens (slow and soft), the 50 makes an affordable fast and sharp choice, and really starts to expose the potential of say an XSi body (hidden behind the kit lens).

    Reply
  47. The canon 50 1.8 can be had for less than $100, for folks with rebel kit lens (slow and soft), the 50 makes an affordable fast and sharp choice, and really starts to expose the potential of say an XSi body (hidden behind the kit lens).

    Reply
  48. I was given the 50mm prime lens (Canon EOS 400D) for last year’s birthday and I love it. So much so I asked for a 28mm prime lens this year and whilst I like that, I still love the 50. Why did I buy it? I think that it was TWIP talking about prime lens in one of the podcasts. Certainly, you guys are responsible for me buying kit this year…

    Reply
  49. 50mm 1.8 was my first lens i purchased for my camera and i love it. Id like to move onto the f/1.2 some day but at that price tag it might be awhile.

    Reply
  50. 50mm 1.8 was my first lens i purchased for my camera and i love it. Id like to move onto the f/1.2 some day but at that price tag it might be awhile.

    Reply
  51. Certainly some credit should go to TWIP and Alex Lindsay for his persistent support for a “fast 50″. After he talked about his 50 so much, I began to look at photos taken with a 50 and decided the Nikkor 50/1.4 will be my next lens. Maybe even the 1.2 but I need to read more to decide if it is worth the added expense for my shooting.

    Reply
  52. Certainly some credit should go to TWIP and Alex Lindsay for his persistent support for a “fast 50″. After he talked about his 50 so much, I began to look at photos taken with a 50 and decided the Nikkor 50/1.4 will be my next lens. Maybe even the 1.2 but I need to read more to decide if it is worth the added expense for my shooting.

    Reply
  53. I was considering trading my Canon 50mm 1.4 for the 1.2, but then decided not to. At 1.2 the depth of field is so thin that I don’t know if I’d ever be using that aperture. The same goes for Canon 85mm 1.2, a great lens for sure, but would I ever be shooting anything at 1.2? Probably not. I’m going to buy the 70-200 2.8 IS L instead, a much more versatile lens.

    Reply
  54. I was considering trading my Canon 50mm 1.4 for the 1.2, but then decided not to. At 1.2 the depth of field is so thin that I don’t know if I’d ever be using that aperture. The same goes for Canon 85mm 1.2, a great lens for sure, but would I ever be shooting anything at 1.2? Probably not. I’m going to buy the 70-200 2.8 IS L instead, a much more versatile lens.

    Reply
  55. Here’s my thoughts on the resurgence.

    1) 15 years ago, “bokeh” was not the cult it is today. English speakers would have no idea what you were talking about.

    2) It’s harder to get bokeh on DX than on film, and a 50mm f/1.8 is the cheapest way by far to get it in extreme ways.

    3) DSLRs are better in low light. For some that means allowing slower zooms, but for some that means a fast prime can literally let you shoot in the dark. 50mm is the cheapest way to do that.

    4) For DX, it’s been marketed as the cheapest portrait lens, especially for kids, etc. Interestingly none of this marketing is done by makers, but by salesmen and online forums.

    Reply
  56. Fortunately I don’ have enough money to follow the trends. My first bit of photo mentoring came from a UK photographer who’s name I forget but gave me some sage advice. You need the right tools for the job you are photographing; whatever that happens to be. I like my 50 and have been using it more, and not relying on the zoom so much.

    Reply
  57. Fortunately I don’ have enough money to follow the trends. My first bit of photo mentoring came from a UK photographer who’s name I forget but gave me some sage advice. You need the right tools for the job you are photographing; whatever that happens to be. I like my 50 and have been using it more, and not relying on the zoom so much.

    Reply
  58. I think it’s interesting to note that most of those buying a 50mm lens today, are actually buying an approximation of an 80mm lens of days gone by, (what I’d call a short portrait lens) Assuming that most SLR photography is currently done in the digital domain and not with $3K-$4K cameras.

    I’m a very short ways from turning 50. When i was younger I was all over primes. Faster the better. Of course, then you started with a fast 50mm (normal) lens. But I don’t think that’s what today’s photographer is after. Scott did you examine the sales of fast 35mm lenses?

    I’m going to go play with my old 50mm right now.

    Reply
  59. I think it’s interesting to note that most of those buying a 50mm lens today, are actually buying an approximation of an 80mm lens of days gone by, (what I’d call a short portrait lens) Assuming that most SLR photography is currently done in the digital domain and not with $3K-$4K cameras.

    I’m a very short ways from turning 50. When i was younger I was all over primes. Faster the better. Of course, then you started with a fast 50mm (normal) lens. But I don’t think that’s what today’s photographer is after. Scott did you examine the sales of fast 35mm lenses?

    I’m going to go play with my old 50mm right now.

    Reply
  60. I personally love my 50s. Since my friend got me into primes fast 50s is all I shoot with.

    I’m really surprised noone in the twip panel explores alternative glass. The most interesting bokeh and drawing comes from vintage glass.

    I recently convert a minolta Rokkor MC f/1.2 and it’s so damn sharp wide open it put my 50mm f/1.2L to shame.

    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3148/2936082975_f838669822_o.jpg

    Go to my flickr if you want to see more samples. I shoot and test a lot of vintage glass with my 5D.

    Reply
  61. According to my Lightroom, about 80 – 90% of my stuff is taken with my 50mm f/1.8 D (Nikon D80).

    I love it cause it forces me to make the shot.

    Reply
  62. According to my Lightroom, about 80 – 90% of my stuff is taken with my 50mm f/1.8 D (Nikon D80).

    I love it cause it forces me to make the shot.

    Reply
  63. I’ve only had my EF 50mm f1.4 for a week but I love the sharpness compared to my EF-S 18-55 kit lens. I must admit that it takes a little getting used to this lens on my crop sensor camera, making it more like a 80mm. Given the quality of the images with this lens, i’m keen to get a wider prime lens, either a 24 or 28mm.

    Reply
  64. I’ve only had my EF 50mm f1.4 for a week but I love the sharpness compared to my EF-S 18-55 kit lens. I must admit that it takes a little getting used to this lens on my crop sensor camera, making it more like a 80mm. Given the quality of the images with this lens, i’m keen to get a wider prime lens, either a 24 or 28mm.

    Reply
  65. I use the Nikon 50mm 1.4 with a Nikon D300. For most of my “everyday/snapshot” photography, the high ISO capabilities of the D300 and the fast 50mm lens means I hardly ever need to use a flash. Great for travel photography too.

    Reply
  66. I use the Nikon 50mm 1.4 with a Nikon D300. For most of my “everyday/snapshot” photography, the high ISO capabilities of the D300 and the fast 50mm lens means I hardly ever need to use a flash. Great for travel photography too.

    Reply
  67. @Ron Aviles

    man that shot is beautiful… makes me what to run out and take pics right now.

    I do have a question about the conversion. How do you do it? Is it a kit or are you doing some machining?

    Reply
  68. @Ron Aviles

    man that shot is beautiful… makes me what to run out and take pics right now.

    I do have a question about the conversion. How do you do it? Is it a kit or are you doing some machining?

    Reply
  69. as some say, 50mm’ is equiv. to the 80mm’ … And people tend to buy the most affordable most recommended thing they could grab onto …
    I personally prefer what the nikon 35mm POV give me, but that’s just because I want the 50mm feel in a cropped sensor. my brother almost shoot his 50mm f1.8 exclusively.
    wish Nikon would produce more prime and sell them at a cheaper price…
    For everyday walk around I use the 35mm f2, for portrait, I prefer my 55mm f2.8. currently saving up money to buy an 85mm f1.8 OR a 105 DC…

    Reply
  70. 80mm makes an arrival?

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  71. 80mm makes an arrival?

    Reply
  72. I just got a 50mm f1.4 for my Pentax K100D. It has been a joy to use and it’s great wide open with beautiful bokeh. Getting more f-stops than the kit lens is a real treat.

    Reply
  73. I just got a 50mm f1.4 for my Pentax K100D. It has been a joy to use and it’s great wide open with beautiful bokeh. Getting more f-stops than the kit lens is a real treat.

    Reply
  74. I also love my 50mm… when I bought my Pentax K100d a few years ago, tried on my old manual Pentax SMC 50mm f1.7 lens and LOVED it. Thats all it took for me to order the FA50 f1.4 autofocus lens.

    The bokeh, clarity and sharpness of a good 50mm prime is hard to beat.

    Reply
  75. I also love my 50mm… when I bought my Pentax K100d a few years ago, tried on my old manual Pentax SMC 50mm f1.7 lens and LOVED it. Thats all it took for me to order the FA50 f1.4 autofocus lens.

    The bokeh, clarity and sharpness of a good 50mm prime is hard to beat.

    Reply
  76. The 50 f/1.4 was the first good lens I bought for my dSLR. It’s been my main lens for almost a year. I’ve shot almost everything on it, from landscapes to portraits. It’s a beautiful lens that takes tack sharp images even in low light.

    Reply
  77. The 50 f/1.4 was the first good lens I bought for my dSLR. It’s been my main lens for almost a year. I’ve shot almost everything on it, from landscapes to portraits. It’s a beautiful lens that takes tack sharp images even in low light.

    Reply
  78. I’ve been shooting at Burning Man for 11 years and the only lens I use there is my Nikon 50 1.4 (on an F100).

    It’s always been my favorite lens and I’m baffled at those who hate it. It’s light, versatile and since it’s short, most people think you’re shooting with a wider lens. And since it matches our eyes, the pictures have a natural intimacy to them. Definitely my desert island lens.

    Reply
  79. I’ve been shooting at Burning Man for 11 years and the only lens I use there is my Nikon 50 1.4 (on an F100).

    It’s always been my favorite lens and I’m baffled at those who hate it. It’s light, versatile and since it’s short, most people think you’re shooting with a wider lens. And since it matches our eyes, the pictures have a natural intimacy to them. Definitely my desert island lens.

    Reply
  80. I really like the 50mm f/1.4 but recently mine has been bumped by a nikon 35mmf/2 on my d80.

    Reply
  81. I really like the 50mm f/1.4 but recently mine has been bumped by a nikon 35mmf/2 on my d80.

    Reply
  82. I’ve been quietly picking up a few old Olympus OM system Zuiko primes from eBay, like the Zuiko 50mm f1.4 which came with a fully functioning OM2 camera attached for less than the cost of half a tank of car fuel.

    With a tiny metal adapter they work fine (manually) on Canon full frame bodies like the 5D and take pretty fine pictures too.

    Reply
  83. I’ve been quietly picking up a few old Olympus OM system Zuiko primes from eBay, like the Zuiko 50mm f1.4 which came with a fully functioning OM2 camera attached for less than the cost of half a tank of car fuel.

    With a tiny metal adapter they work fine (manually) on Canon full frame bodies like the 5D and take pretty fine pictures too.

    Reply

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