Two news releases just sent to us directly from Canon…

CANON U.S.A. INTRODUCES THE HIGHLY ANTICIPATED
EOS 5D MARK II DSLR CAMERA FEATURING FULL-FRAME HD VIDEO CAPTURE
The Canon EOS 5D Mark II Escalates Full-Frame Digital SLR Photography to the Next Level HD Movie Recording Capabilities, DIGIC 4 Imaging Processor, and 21.1 Megapixel Resolution
LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., September 17, 2008 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging, today introduced the EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR camera, the long-awaited successor to Canon’s highly popular EOS 5D, introduced in 2005. Building upon the qualities that made the EOS 5D camera so successful, Canon has coupled the creative power of a full-frame CMOS sensor in a relatively compact and affordable camera body, together with groundbreaking HD video capture that opens the door to a much wider range of imaging possibilities for photographers. Along with the ability to capture full HD video clips at 1920 x 1080 resolution, Canon’s EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR camera features a 21.1-megapixel full frame 24 x 36mm CMOS sensor, DIGIC 4 imaging processor and significantly lower noise, with an expanded sensitivity range from ISO 50 to ISO 25,600.

“The anticipation surrounding the launch of this camera model has exceeded our greatest expectations, and we believe our loyal customers will be awed by the level of innovation and features built into the new EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR. Once they have the chance to experience the camera, we believe they will agree that it was worth the wait,” stated Yuichi Ishizuka, senior vice president and general manager, Consumer Imaging Group, Canon U.S.A.

Among the many advancements in Canon’s new EOS 5D Mark II camera is the Company’s proprietary DIGIC 4 Imaging Processor that powers the camera’s fast 14-bit analog-to-digital conversion for smooth color tones and exceptional gradation. The Canon EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR offers a full-frame 24 x 36mm, 21.1 megapixel CMOS sensor and continuous shooting at 3.9 frames per second (fps) for an unlimited number of full-resolution JPEGs to the capacity of the memory card or up to 14 RAW images in a single burst when using a UDMA CF card. The camera includes a 15-point Autofocus (AF) sensor with nine selectable AF points plus six additional Assist AF points (three center AF points sensitive to f/2.8 lenses) with enhanced light source detection and AF microadjustment for greater autofocus performance. The EOS 5D Mark II camera also features a large, clear 3.0-inch Clear View LCD screen with 920,000 dot/VGA resolution, four times the pixel count of the EOS 5D camera’s 2.5-inch screen, for enhanced clarity and color when viewing images. The new camera is equipped with a high-performance, high-magnification optical viewfinder providing 98 percent coverage, giving a new dimension to the saying, “what you see is what you get.” Professional photographers will also appreciate the enhanced 150,000-cycle shutter durability of the EOS 5D Mark II camera.

Canon, the first company to introduce a full-frame digital camera, has improved the EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR camera’s newly developed full-frame CMOS image sensor. Utilizing proprietary Canon technology, the Company has reduced noise and expanded the sensitivity of the CMOS sensor up to ISO 25600, which is three full stops higher than the ISO 3200 limit of the original EOS 5D camera. Although the individual pixel dimensions of the EOS 5D Mark II camera are the same as the 21.1-megapixel CMOS sensor used in the EOS-1Ds Mark III digital SLR, the new sensor incorporates an improved output amplifier and a more advanced color filter that improves light transmission while retaining excellent color reproduction. By applying the same kind of advancements in sensor design and image processing technology as the recently introduced EOS 50D camera, but at higher resolution and with larger pixels, the EOS 5D Mark II achieves the highest level of image quality of any EOS Digital SLR released to date.

With the combination of its improved CMOS image sensor and the powerful new DIGIC 4 image processor, the Canon EOS 5D Mark II camera provides ISO speeds from ISO 100 up to ISO 6400 in 1/3-stop increments, along with two high-speed settings – H1 and H2 – of ISO 12800 and ISO 25600, respectively, as well as a low-speed setting of ISO 50. The full-frame sensor maximizes the performance of Canon EF lenses, the world’s largest selection of autofocus lenses.

HD and SD Video Capture
Canon has taken its expertise in imaging, photography and video capture technology to a new level with the EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR. Answering the question of where SLR technology is going next, the EOS 5D Mark II features 16:9 Full HD video capture at 1920 x 1080 pixels and 30 fps as well as 4:3 standard TV quality (SD) video capture at 640 x 480 pixels and 30 fps, both capabilities appearing for the first time in a Canon SLR camera. Video capture is part of the camera’s Live View function, using the Picture Style that has been set for Live View still image shooting. This allows skilled photographers and cinematographers to adjust image sharpness, contrast, color saturation and white balance, and have those settings apply to the movie image. When recording video, the camera’s rear LCD screen can be letter-boxed by a semi-transparent border to match the aspect ratio of the movie recording size. Moreover, the EOS 5D Mark II camera’s HD video capability enables new levels of creative expression through its unfettered access to the complete line of more than 60 Canon EF lenses, which provide an incredible variety of visual effects including everything from ultra-wide-angle and fish-eye to macro and super-telephoto, including many large-aperture L-series professional lenses that can keep the main subject in razor-sharp focus while blurring the background beyond recognition.

The EOS 5D Mark II will record video up to 4GB per clip or a maximum continuous movie capture time of 29 minutes and 59 seconds, whichever comes first. Depending on the level of detail in the scene, a 4GB memory card can record approximately 12 minutes of video at full HD resolution or approximately 24 minutes in standard definition.[i]camera includes an HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) output to display crisp, clear images on a High-Definition TV.  Video clips are recorded in .MOV format using an MPEG-4 video compression and sound is recorded using linear PCM[ii] without compression. The new camera features an input terminal for external stereo microphones as well as a built-in monaural microphone for convenience. To help show off those fantastic movies as well as still photos, the EOS 5D Mark II

Live View Shooting
For both still images and video, the Canon EOS 5D Mark II camera features Live View, one of the most sought after features in digital SLRs today. The 5D Mark II features three Live View AF modes – Quick, Live and Face Detection Live mode – for capturing either still photos or video, each with its own attributes. Quick mode automatically sets One-Shot AF using the camera’s phase detection AF system. It also allows users to select the AF point, even while the Live View image is displayed. Although the camera’s reflex mirror must be lowered briefly to take an AF measurement in Quick mode, it is the fastest way to set focus automatically when the 5D Mark II camera is set for Live View.

Live mode uses contrast-detection AF with the image sensor and here, as with Quick mode, users can change the AF point using the Multi-controller. Face Detection Live mode uses contrast AF to recognize human faces. When multiple faces are detected, the largest face closest to the center of the frame is targeted as the AF point. While Live View is engaged users can still change settings including the AF mode (Quick, Live, Face Detection Live mode), drive mode, ISO speed, Picture style, White Balance, and more.Peripheral Illumination Correction

The Canon EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR camera automatically conducts peripheral illumination correction when shooting JPEG images, a function that previously could only be accomplished through post-image processing using software such as Canon’s Digital Photo Professional, which Canon supplies at no extra charge. Peripheral illumination correction evens brightness across the image field, making an image of a blue sky even toned throughout and reducing light fall-off at image edges. This new feature essentially eliminates one of the limitations of previous full-frame digital SLRs.

Auto Lighting Optimizer
Canon’s enhanced Auto Lighting Optimizer technology helps ensure each picture’s subject is clearly visible by analyzing image brightness and automatically adjusting dark areas in images so that they appear brighter. This function is ideal in high-contrast situations such as urban landscapes captured on sunny days, where the tops of buildings are brightly lit while street level details are obscured by heavy shadows. In this type of scene, the 5D Mark II camera’s Auto Lighting Optimizer technology preserves accurate exposure of the highlights while opening up the shadow areas for a more pleasing tonal rendition.

Canon’s New Creative Auto Mode
Recently introduced with the new EOS 50D, Canon’s “CA” Creative Full Auto setting can also be found on the EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR camera’s mode dial. This setting allows users to make image adjustments such as aperture or shutter speed through an easy-to-understand navigation screen on the camera’s LCD menu, allowing them to “blur the background” or “lighten or darken the image.” These easy-to-understand image options allow photographers to experiment with image options while still shooting in an automatic mode.

Two Small RAW Formats
For photographers seeking the flexibility and creative possibilities of shooting RAW format images, without the large file size, the Canon EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR camera offers two more manageable file size options with sRAW1 and sRAW2 recording formats. At the sRAW1 setting, resolution is 10.0-megapixels with a file size that is approximately 25 percent smaller than a standard 21.1-megapixel RAW image. With the sRAW2 setting, resolution is 5.2 megapixels at less than half the file size of a standard RAW image, retaining all of the flexibility and creative possibilities associated with full-size, conventional RAW images. Wedding and portrait photographers, in particular, will appreciate the options of variable resolution and file size which allow them to fine-tune the 5D Mark II’s operation for their specific needs.

Silent Shooting in Live View
Canon has equipped the EOS 5D Mark II with two Silent Shooting modes in Live View which will prove particularly helpful to law enforcement officials, and for behind-the-scenes shooting on movie sets. In Mode 1, the camera will shoot with the mechanical shutter open at the beginning of the exposure, using the electronic 1st-curtain function of the CMOS sensor and a reduced shutter-cocking noise, allowing multiple shots to be taken with minimal noise. In Mode 2, to minimize shutter noise during single frame photography, shutter cocking does not occur until the shutter button returns to the half-way position after shooting.

EOS Integrated Cleaning System
With the introduction of the EOS 5D Mark II camera, the entire Canon EOS system is now equipped with the highly acclaimed EOS Integrated Cleaning System. The Self-Cleaning Sensor Unit for the Canon EOS 5D Mark II has been upgraded with a fluorine coating on the low-pass filter for better dust resistance.

Pricing and Availability
The Canon EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR camera is compatible with Canon EF lenses and is scheduled for delivery by the end of November. The EOS 5D Mark II will be sold in a body-only configuration at an estimated retail price of $2,699[iii]. It will additionally be offered in a kit version with Canon’s EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM zoom lens at an estimated retail price of $3,499[iv].

New EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM Lens

The new EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM lens is the successor to Canon’s EF 24mm f/1.4L USM professional wide-angle lens released in 1997. Targeting professional photographers, the new EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM lens has been introduced to address the advancements high-resolution digital SLR cameras with re-designed optics and use of a new anti-reflection lens coating called SWC (Sub-Wavelength Structure Coating) to minimize ghosting and flare. Features such as dustproof and waterproof construction that have been adopted make this a high-performance lens with specifications that respond to the demands of professional users. A welcome complement to the EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR camera, the EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM lens is scheduled to be in stores this December at an estimated retail price of $1,699.

CANON U.S.A. COMBINES ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY WITH A PROFESSIONAL STYLE DESIGN IN ITS LATEST ADDITION OF HIGH-END G-SERIES CAMERAS

Canon PowerShot G10 Digital Camera, the Flagship of the PowerShot line, Boasts Uncompromising Specs and High-Quality, Making It a Must-Have for the Advanced Amateurs

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., September 17, 2008 – Canon U.S.A., a leader in digital imaging, today announced the newest addition to its top-of-the line PowerShot G-series digital cameras.  The PowerShot G10 digital camera offers serious amateur shooters and professional photographers several essential ingredients for a flagship model, including Canon’s new DIGIC 4 image processor, 28mm Optical Image Stabilized lens and RAW mode.  This trilogy of style, performance and image quality is an ideal professional complement for anyone seeking the photo quality of a DSLR, combined with the convenient size of a point-and-shoot.
As the successor model to the popular PowerShot G9 digital camera, the PowerShot G10 digital camera is loaded with Canon’s latest technologies, including a long-anticipated 28 mm wide-angle lens with 5x optical zoom, 14.7 megapixels and 3.0-inch Pure Color LCD II screen.
“With exquisite image quality, the latest image processor and advanced functionality, the Canon PowerShot G10 digital camera brings an elevated level of performance and usability to the PowerShot line,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, senior vice president and general manager, Consumer Imaging Group, Canon U.S.A.  “By enhancing key technologies in this camera, including our proprietary DIGIC 4 image processor, Canon has merged the functions typically found in a DSLR with a smaller body form to provide affordable and portable options to photo enthusiasts of all types.”
Control Options
The controller wheel is equipped with a dedicated Exposure Compensation Dial, which allows quick and intuitive adjustment of exposure compensation and the “My Menu” function for registering five user-selected options from the shooting menu, as well as 26 shooting modes.  Additionally, the Custom Mode better allows the user to record two types of shooting parameter settings, thus offering the ability to arrange their most often used settings on their LCD display.  A host of accessory options are offered, including the remote switch, Macro Ring Lite and Macro Twin Lite (when used with an additional attachment, available in January 2009).  Now consumers can utilize similar accessories found in the Canon EOS line, therefore expanding a user’s ability to customize.
Canon DIGIC 4 Imaging Processor
The newly upgraded DIGIC 4 image processor, a proprietary technology, accounts for the camera’s higher performance levels, including significantly improved signal processing speed and higher image quality.
One of the most important new features made possible by the DIGIC 4 image processor is Servo AF, which is a form of continuous focus tracking for moving subjects.  By pressing the shutter button half-way, the camera can track subject movement up to the instant of exposure, resulting in sharper photographs. Additionally, the processor’s high ISO speed noise reduction processing has improved substantially to enable consumers to shoot high-quality images, even in extremely dark situations without the use of a flash.  The new Intelligent Contrast Correction function automatically improves image quality in high-contrast shooting situations.
The Genuine Canon Face Detection technology has evolved even further, thanks to DIGIC 4.  Improved features include the ability to recognize human faces at most angles.  Another innovation is the Face Detection Self-Timer, which automatically takes a photo two seconds after a new face enters the scene.
Availability and Pricing
Scheduled to be available in October, the PowerShot G10 digital camera will have an estimated selling price of $499.99*.  Kit contents will include a battery, charger, neck strap, USB and A/V interface cables, Canon Digital Solutions Software CD, and a 1-year Canon U.S.A., Inc. limited warranty.

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This post sponsored by the Digital SLR Store

Join the conversation! 70 Comments

  1. Yay! I no longer want to defect to Nikon!

    Of course, I want to see some of the images this thing produces before I decide I want to get it, but….

    Reply
  2. Yay! I no longer want to defect to Nikon!

    Of course, I want to see some of the images this thing produces before I decide I want to get it, but….

    Reply
  3. I got a 5D shortly after it came out, and have been drooling over the Nikon releases earlier this year. I think I know what I will be asking for at Christmas this year… :-)

    Reply
  4. I’m sorry, but I think the G10 is a step BACK. It appears to be clunky-er and almost toy-ish. The 14.7mp has no benefit over the 10.1 in the LX3 and the lens is simply ‘normal’ and nothing like what I was hoping for. I’m either picking up and LX3 or G9 now and the G9 will be cheap. I like the pro features the G series has over the LX3, but ugh it’s a hard decision Im hoping to solve.

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  5. As a Canon user I’ll admit I was a bit worried about their recent cameras, but wow, I didn’t expect this. I can’t wait to see how it performs in the real world.

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  6. I’m confused – on the 5D MKII features page it says “Compatible with over 60 Canon EF/EF-S lenses and most EOS System accessories.” while on the Specifications page it says “Compatible Lenses Canon EF lenses (35mm-equivalent focal length is approx. 1.6x the lens focal length)”

    Apart from the contradiction with regard to the EF-S lenses since when does a full frame have a multiplier?

    I still want it though!

    Reply
  7. THe 5DMII is a little disappointing if you want to shoot sports. 9 AF and 3.9 fps. Overall it looks like a good camera but I was expecting Canon to blow Nikon away. IMO that did not happen. Would like to look at the photos at high ISO.

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  8. I don’t under stand why Canon feels they have to stuff so many megapixels on a small sensor. Give me 8 migapixels and I’d probably buy it. LX3 looks like my new favorite.

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  9. By the way, I’ve only used a G9, so I’m basing my opinion on specs, form factor, reviews alone.

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  10. By the way, I’ve only used a G9, so I’m basing my opinion on specs, form factor, reviews alone.

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  11. Nikon = Answered.

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  12. I almost bought a g9 recently for the longer lens, but will wait for g10. The g10s higher megapixels might allow me to crop tighter to similar effect of the G9s longer telephoto. And it is nice to have wider lens at times.

    It is the ISO that interests me most in the G10, and am waiting for someone to actually post some 1600 ISO shots to flickr. There are other ways to increase apparent ISO sensitivity without having larger physical pixels. Am wondering if bundling four pixels as one might provide lower light sensitivity. And there is the shadow detail curve trick.

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  13. Yes YES YESSSSSSSSSSSSSS….. This made my day!!! OMG OMG OMG!!!!

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  14. Yes YES YESSSSSSSSSSSSSS….. This made my day!!! OMG OMG OMG!!!!

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  15. Yeah, it’s a needed move on Canon’s part but what’s up with the slow fps for stills when it can capture 30 fps of HD video? (I went into this a little on my blog post too…). Did they pick up the gauntlet Nikon threw down? Yeah, probably b/c they beat the video, but this was to be expected given Canon’s history with video capture. The question that only time will tell is whether this is enough to recapture the throne…Canon has a few more pics on their press release site too…I just did the low res on my blog, w/ only specs so if you don’t want the whole press release, that’s available too for quick analysis. Thanks for the scoop TWIP (a.k.a. Scott) – I heard it here first! :)

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  16. Canon brings out the big guns (pun intended). Where does this leave the 1Ds mkIII now? I don’t understand why they ate into their own pro-market with the 21.1 mpx sensor. I enjoy the 12mpx sensor on the current 5d, aside from the lower ISO performance.

    BUT BUT BUT, I was ready to go the route of picking up a Canon HV20 and doing the SLR mod to it. I think I’ll redirect my coin to this baby and a release date a week before my birthday.

    To Steve, Happy Birthday, from Steve!!!

    Reply
  17. […] full article – Canon Announces New Full Frame Camera & G10 – TWIPScott Wed, 17 Sep 2008 04:08:33 […]

    Reply
  18. […] full article – Canon Announces New Full Frame Camera & G10 – TWIPScott Wed, 17 Sep 2008 04:08:33 […]

    Reply
  19. Video is great! Can’t wait to try it. The demo video with the TS-E 45mm looks really cool.

    Next major step is full res video though, where you can pick out a still from exactly the best moment.

    Reply
  20. Video is great! Can’t wait to try it. The demo video with the TS-E 45mm looks really cool.

    Next major step is full res video though, where you can pick out a still from exactly the best moment.

    Reply
  21. Hmm, I am glad that the G10 doesn’t really blow me away. I was holding out for a while with buying a G9 before the summer, with G10 rumors starting to buzz, but I bought the G9 anyway. It was put to good use during my vacation where I couldn’t have brought my dSLR with me. (Think waterfalls, mountains, mud, rain, rocks and raft building :P)
    As the 5D Mk. II is out of my price range, I am looking forward to some reviews on the 50D to replace my 400D. (Or maybe pick up a nice 40D for half price :)

    Reply
  22. Hmm, I am glad that the G10 doesn’t really blow me away. I was holding out for a while with buying a G9 before the summer, with G10 rumors starting to buzz, but I bought the G9 anyway. It was put to good use during my vacation where I couldn’t have brought my dSLR with me. (Think waterfalls, mountains, mud, rain, rocks and raft building :P)
    As the 5D Mk. II is out of my price range, I am looking forward to some reviews on the 50D to replace my 400D. (Or maybe pick up a nice 40D for half price :)

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  23. Well I am a Nikon guy, and all I can say is great for Canon. The race really is stepping up a pace between these two companies. I think the specs (on paper) of the 5D MK II sound superb. What more could you really possibly ask for out of a DSLR. And the price seems great too. My only really reservation is, after reading the above post is firstly, from the specs of the 5D its now out-performing Canon’s flagship model the 1Ds Mk III in many ways. I also have a concern regarding such high ISOs at such a high pixel count. But I guess the proof is in the end results we will see shortly in terms of photos posted on the web from the camera.

    In terms of the new G10, I think Canon is on the wrong end, but appealing to the masses in terms of an increase in pixels compared to the earlier model. The G9 is a fine camera – I just hope the G10 does not result in a more noise per pixel.

    Finally, I now wait with anticipation to see what Nikon will bring out this month before the show starts. Go Nikon Go….

    Mark

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  24. All I have to say about the 5D Mkii is ho#$$ sh@#%. I can’t believe they packed it with all this stuff. Was it worth the wait? Humm YEAH; am I going to buy it? Most likely, but first let’s see some pics and vids and lets wait for the raw support in leopard.

    What do you think Scott? Any regrets?

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  25. 21.1mpix raw-files will fill upp drives like crazy. Can you guys please explain and test the different raw-modes and what type of image quality a sRAW-picture would hold. Does a sRAW picture user a smaller piece of the sensor or is the smaller size fixed by the cameras software?

    Do you think the sRAW1 or even sRAW2 setting still outperform a 40d? What are the pros and cons of shooting in sRAW. Enlighten me! :-)

    Love the show! The best one out there!

    Regards
    Martin Fryxell
    Stockholm, Sweden

    Reply
  26. 21.1mpix raw-files will fill upp drives like crazy. Can you guys please explain and test the different raw-modes and what type of image quality a sRAW-picture would hold. Does a sRAW picture user a smaller piece of the sensor or is the smaller size fixed by the cameras software?

    Do you think the sRAW1 or even sRAW2 setting still outperform a 40d? What are the pros and cons of shooting in sRAW. Enlighten me! :-)

    Love the show! The best one out there!

    Regards
    Martin Fryxell
    Stockholm, Sweden

    Reply
  27. Looks nice. If this sensor is as good as previous, looks like they’re onto a winner! Does this bring them back into competition with Nikon, regarding the D3/D700?

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  28. Man you can’t beat that price, but I think the proof will be in the pudding!

    Reply
  29. Very interesting. I’ll keep tabs on them both to see how they turn out.

    I’m surprised that the 5DII upstages the much more expensive 1DIII with a supposedly better sensor, I wonder how long Canon is going to leave their top dog out in the cold like that without an update. Usually electronics companies don’t do that without a very good reason.

    One of my biggest objections in increasing pixel count in a dSLR is the size of the files, and this offers a way to reduce file size without having to resort to JPEG. I’m more concerned with color range than the number of pixels. Most of the time I really don’t even need 5MP, but it’s nice to have some flexibility.

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  30. The picture of the 5D looks real crusty until you zoom on it. Anyway, I’ll take a 5D MK II to go, no crust. If I ever figure out all the functions on the G9, maybe I’ll look at the G10. BTW, the G3 (still) works great.

    Reply
  31. I am glad my Canon glass kept me here… or else I would have defected to Nikon. I guess you could say I would have pulled a Bourne

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  32. I can’t wait for Alex to get (and subsequently lose) his G10 so we can all reap the rewards!

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  33. I can’t wait for Alex to get (and subsequently lose) his G10 so we can all reap the rewards!

    Reply
  34. Wow – it will be interesting to see how useful the 25,600 ISO is in reality. The Nikons seem to have useful ISO (i.e., minimal noise) up pretty far into the range. Hopefully Canon’s useful ISO range is similar.

    It’s a great time to be a consumer with two companies committed to innovation in the marketplace.

    Reply
  35. I hope, with both the 5D MkII and G10, that the increase in pixel count does not have a negative impact on the higher ISO settings. I can’t comment on the current 5D but on my 400D and G9 noise becomes noticeable above ISO 400 and 200 respectively.

    I’m looking forward reading some reviews soon! If they are favorable then I’ll have to make space under the Christmas tree for a MkII.

    Reply
  36. I hope, with both the 5D MkII and G10, that the increase in pixel count does not have a negative impact on the higher ISO settings. I can’t comment on the current 5D but on my 400D and G9 noise becomes noticeable above ISO 400 and 200 respectively.

    I’m looking forward reading some reviews soon! If they are favorable then I’ll have to make space under the Christmas tree for a MkII.

    Reply
  37. I’m a bit concerned with the “New Creative Auto Mode” in the 5D Mk. II- this camera is almost $3000 and they’re adding features that I’d expect to see on a P&S. The other upgrades to it are nice, and came in good time, but I’m sticking with my current 5D.

    Reply
  38. Several of you have asked me if this causes second thoughts in my switch. The answer is no. I shoot primarily wildlife. The 5D MK II is more of a studio, portrait, nature camera. At 3.9 FPS and a smaller range of autofocus sensors compared to the D3, it’s just not fast enough for wildlife or sports. And while I have yet to see the test shots, I can’t imagine the low-light performance being on par with the D3. When I had the 1DS MK III, it was nowhere near as good at ISO 3200 as the D3 is. If you cram too many pixels onto a small sensor, noise is guaranteed at some point. That said, they have a new DIGIC processor so maybe they’ve found a way to deal with it. I’ll test and report back here. But in any event, I am very happy with the D3. If Canon comes out with a replacement for the 1DMK III (not the S) I might ADD it to my collection, but not switch. I just got 40K worth of Nikon gear so I am going to stick with that.

    Reply
  39. Several of you have asked me if this causes second thoughts in my switch. The answer is no. I shoot primarily wildlife. The 5D MK II is more of a studio, portrait, nature camera. At 3.9 FPS and a smaller range of autofocus sensors compared to the D3, it’s just not fast enough for wildlife or sports. And while I have yet to see the test shots, I can’t imagine the low-light performance being on par with the D3. When I had the 1DS MK III, it was nowhere near as good at ISO 3200 as the D3 is. If you cram too many pixels onto a small sensor, noise is guaranteed at some point. That said, they have a new DIGIC processor so maybe they’ve found a way to deal with it. I’ll test and report back here. But in any event, I am very happy with the D3. If Canon comes out with a replacement for the 1DMK III (not the S) I might ADD it to my collection, but not switch. I just got 40K worth of Nikon gear so I am going to stick with that.

    Reply
  40. It indeed is a fantastic time to be into digital image acquisition (both moving and stills). I just got myself a D700 (Fuji S3 stalwart with a bag of F mount glass) but this 5D looks the part, esp with the vid capture.

    R.

    Reply
  41. I think the noise will be fine at high ISO’s. Here’s a sample gallery from a pre-production 50D.

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  42. I think the noise will be fine at high ISO’s. Here’s a sample gallery from a pre-production 50D.

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  43. Awesome, I just wish I had this kind of money :(

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  44. Who cares about video capture. Its a DSLR. With the D90 it only shoots for a max of 5 minutes and mono audio with no XLR inputs. If you want video, get a video camera or a G9/G10. I’ll shoot frames with my D300 and D700 and shoot video with my GL2 or Vixia HF11.

    Reply
  45. Who cares about video capture. Its a DSLR. With the D90 it only shoots for a max of 5 minutes and mono audio with no XLR inputs. If you want video, get a video camera or a G9/G10. I’ll shoot frames with my D300 and D700 and shoot video with my GL2 or Vixia HF11.

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  46. Canon stated that this sensor has less noise than any one they’ve ever made. So the fact that the 1Ds III was not as noiseless as the D3 is not that meaningful. We’ll have to wait and see what the high ISO shots look like. I looked for the source on that but couldn’t find it.

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  47. I agree. Who was hungry for video capability on their DSLR?? Especially a prosumer cam.

    I prefer dedicated devices…the addition of video might be novel, but it certainly makes the camera cost more, and also adds layers of technical vulnerabilities to the device.
    It will decrease sensor, shutter, battery and card life, and introduces vectors for firmware issues and software bugs. Definetely not what I want on a camera I want as my best means of capturing still photography. If I want video, I’ll use a video camera, which will give me far better options. Having video on a DSLR might be handy now and then, but I never found myself missing it or wishing my DSLR had it…
    OMMV.

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  48. For the G10, I wish Canon had stuck with the excellent f/2.0 lens they used on early G-series cameras like the G2. Image stabilization and higher ISOs are great, but they don’t beat a good fast lens.

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  49. Dennis, Quin; You’re making a bigger deal about supposed drawbacks than is necessary, and you are probably not knowledgeable about the potential upsides here. There are specific reasons why this may be interesting to video people that you may not be aware of. An HF11 is actually a very solid unit, but it’s just not the same.

    Not only is it a solid dSLR, the video option is quite a boon, at least for me, and it is generating interest in others too.

    This is a system that offers 35mm depth of field control without having to buy a $1000 depth of field adapter that reduces the amount of light going into the camcorder by as much as two stops.

    This is a 35mm camera that can record video. Most camcorders have 1/3″ sensors into the $10k range and even beyond. The next step up above 5DII for video with 35mm sensor that is the Red One, costing $40k in a usable rig.

    The 5 minute time limit per shot is not a problem for a lot of filmmaking. Hollywood movies often don’t have shots longer than 7 seconds. Documentaries often don’t take five minute shots either. If you’re shooting a football game, then it’s not going to work.

    The camera is not doing a shutter actuation for each frame. I doubt it adds to the component costs. It adds to development costs, but all said and done, it’s not a big deal on a per camera basis, especially compared to the cost of a 35mm sensor.

    Reply
  50. Dennis, Quin; You’re making a bigger deal about supposed drawbacks than is necessary, and you are probably not knowledgeable about the potential upsides here. There are specific reasons why this may be interesting to video people that you may not be aware of. An HF11 is actually a very solid unit, but it’s just not the same.

    Not only is it a solid dSLR, the video option is quite a boon, at least for me, and it is generating interest in others too.

    This is a system that offers 35mm depth of field control without having to buy a $1000 depth of field adapter that reduces the amount of light going into the camcorder by as much as two stops.

    This is a 35mm camera that can record video. Most camcorders have 1/3″ sensors into the $10k range and even beyond. The next step up above 5DII for video with 35mm sensor that is the Red One, costing $40k in a usable rig.

    The 5 minute time limit per shot is not a problem for a lot of filmmaking. Hollywood movies often don’t have shots longer than 7 seconds. Documentaries often don’t take five minute shots either. If you’re shooting a football game, then it’s not going to work.

    The camera is not doing a shutter actuation for each frame. I doubt it adds to the component costs. It adds to development costs, but all said and done, it’s not a big deal on a per camera basis, especially compared to the cost of a 35mm sensor.

    Reply
  51. Love those sample images from the 50D, this is indeed an excellent horse race.

    Reply
  52. JeffDM, WHO CARES. If I want video, I’ll buy a Red Scarlet and be done with it. For just quick video capture, I prefer my G9/G10. Its like putting spinners on a Ferrari F430. Anyway, this is TWiP Photo no TWiP Video. Maybe Scott and Alex would like to produce another show on video. Oh yeah, its MacBreak Tech.

    Reply
  53. JeffDM, WHO CARES. If I want video, I’ll buy a Red Scarlet and be done with it. For just quick video capture, I prefer my G9/G10. Its like putting spinners on a Ferrari F430. Anyway, this is TWiP Photo no TWiP Video. Maybe Scott and Alex would like to produce another show on video. Oh yeah, its MacBreak Tech.

    Reply
  54. Sigh. Yet more features a photographer won’t use. Face Detection, “Creative Auto Mode”? How about we stick to the basics? What’s next integrated Ipod controls?

    Give me low noise, and excellent low light performance. Flash memory is getting cheap. How about faster, larger memory buffers? 21.1Megapixles? Do you realize how large these files are getting? How about better weather sealing? Wireless flash control in the body? The improved ISO performance is promising. The self cleaning sensor is good. But this really just sounds like a beefed up 50D. An incremental improvement at best. Nothing fabulous, just this year’s model. This does not hit me like the the Nikon D3 and D700, and I am a Canon fan.

    The new 24mm F1.4 II sounds good. How about an EF or EF-S 30mm F1.4 USM? This would give a FOVCF of 48mm on the 40D, 50D, and Rebels. I would gladly pay the canon premium. Instead I am probably going to get the sigma lens.

    I look forward to seeing comparisons between the 5D II and the D700. I plan on upgrading next summer/fall. I hope Canon gets their act together. I really don’t want to change systems, but they are not addressing the camera features I find most important. It will be a real pain to switch but Canon has not given me a compelling reason to stay with them.

    Reply
  55. […] info on the blog at TWIP, and a preview on […]

    Reply
  56. did someone say integrated iPod controls. How bout using your iTouch as a remote trigger. I love this iExtendability keep it iComing it sounds iFabulous we could even have an SLR lens adapter for the iPhone

    Just imagine

    Reply
  57. Really disappointed with the G10. I was hoping for f2.0 and better hi ISO performance. Instead we get more pixels and more crappy features.

    Le sigh.

    Reply
  58. The only thing the I want for my old 5D is improved IQ, weather protection, and sensor cleaning/dust masking. If I wanted to take video I will use my 9G or buy a Video camera.

    Video on a 5D is about as useful as a direct print button. Is Canon trying to create the swiss army knife of the DSLR world? Hey Canon why don’t you get plugged into the consumer. We care about IQ, weather protection, and clean sensors.

    My nerd side says hey neat stuff, my bang for the buck side says give us IQ…IQ….IQ not a swiss army knife.

    Sorry about the rant, I am disappointed, perhaps they can come out with a 5D MK I 1/2.

    Reply
  59. The only thing the I want for my old 5D is improved IQ, weather protection, and sensor cleaning/dust masking. If I wanted to take video I will use my 9G or buy a Video camera.

    Video on a 5D is about as useful as a direct print button. Is Canon trying to create the swiss army knife of the DSLR world? Hey Canon why don’t you get plugged into the consumer. We care about IQ, weather protection, and clean sensors.

    My nerd side says hey neat stuff, my bang for the buck side says give us IQ…IQ….IQ not a swiss army knife.

    Sorry about the rant, I am disappointed, perhaps they can come out with a 5D MK I 1/2.

    Reply
  60. Dennis, I care. I do photos and video, and this thing offers specific video capabilities and features not found in video cameras at less than three times its price or even higher.

    And it’s not like putting spinners on a race car. The video samples from this is far nicer than a G9 or G10 can possibly offer, the footage even better than any of my HD camcorders can muster, a couple Canons included. I am also not seeing anything on this camera that compromises the photography by adding video recording, so I don’t see what the complaining is about.

    Even the Red Scarlet has about 1/8 the image sensor area as a 35mm camera, and Scarlet doesn’t offer interchangeable lenses either.

    Reply
  61. Dennis, I care. I do photos and video, and this thing offers specific video capabilities and features not found in video cameras at less than three times its price or even higher.

    And it’s not like putting spinners on a race car. The video samples from this is far nicer than a G9 or G10 can possibly offer, the footage even better than any of my HD camcorders can muster, a couple Canons included. I am also not seeing anything on this camera that compromises the photography by adding video recording, so I don’t see what the complaining is about.

    Even the Red Scarlet has about 1/8 the image sensor area as a 35mm camera, and Scarlet doesn’t offer interchangeable lenses either.

    Reply
  62. I’ll keep my G9. Actually I’m selling it and getting either the G10 or LX3 with 16:9 720p HD at 24fps. Dirt cheap too.

    Reply
  63. I’ll keep my G9. Actually I’m selling it and getting either the G10 or LX3 with 16:9 720p HD at 24fps. Dirt cheap too.

    Reply
  64. I fully agree with JeffDM. (I have seen the samples of the video, and it surpases even the top gear in the market today).

    I shoot primarily studio/location glamour and fashion. This edition of the 5D will reshape the market, as we know it. Not just in photography but video as well.

    But for buyers, really this discussion is spilt down the middle. JeffDM can see the benefit from using the 5DMKII and will use it to its full potential. However for the average user, video for personal use at the moment will not require anything higher than what the G9 can offer.

    Therefore Dennis, realise that individuals will find uses of products that most users will never touch on. Those few individuals that will use those functions are usually the ones that are first purchasing the equipment.

    I have my 5DMKII on pre-order already. When it arrives, my current 5D will move to backup.

    Reply
  65. G9s have apparently gone UP in price since the G10 announcement, so apparently a lot of people have not had their socks knocked off by the new feature set. I’m still not totally decided which I would prefer, and would love to see a side by side comparison of G9 and G10 once the G10 is available. Canon is competing with itself too much.

    Reply
  66. Wow. The wheel of progress rolls a few more degrees forward. If Scotty would have held on to all that glass he took such a wash on he could have had quite a set up for only a few thousand dollars more. And odds are better than even that next year Canon will announce a D3 killer.

    Reply
  67. @Michael What? Are you talking about the 5d MK II? That camera isn’t even CLOSE to what I would need to shoot wildlife. And it’s not possible for Canon to announce, let alone ship a D3 killer. That assumes I would give up the D3 just because Canon came out with a new camera.

    In any event, I’d bet Nikon will revamp the D3 with V2 LONG before Canon releases the 1d MK IV – which is the camera that would compete with the D3.

    Reply
  68. @Michael What? Are you talking about the 5d MK II? That camera isn’t even CLOSE to what I would need to shoot wildlife. And it’s not possible for Canon to announce, let alone ship a D3 killer. That assumes I would give up the D3 just because Canon came out with a new camera.

    In any event, I’d bet Nikon will revamp the D3 with V2 LONG before Canon releases the 1d MK IV – which is the camera that would compete with the D3.

    Reply

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About scottbourne

Founder of Photofocus.com. Retired traveling and unhooking from the Internet.

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