September 9, 2008

Best Photo Bags

I’m often asked which photo bag I prefer. I own several. It’s unlikely that one bag will suit everyone’s needs. But there are big differences in both bag quality and price. And protecting and transporting your gear from shoot to shoot is an important part of the photographic process.

My favorite bag company is ThinkTank Photo. They make bags from a photographer’s point of view. And their bags are competitively priced, tough, well-designed and feature generous warranties. They’ve grown their product line to include bags for almost any situation.

Whenever I can – I use the Airport Securtity. It’s tough as nails an holds a ton of gear. I do use other brands for special circumstances – say, flying with a big lens on a regional jet – or hiking. But most of the time, I use the ThinkTank gear.

The thing that most impresses me about ThinkTankPhoto’s bags is the attention to detail that I see in each of their products. They use the best zippers and wheels I have ever seen. The design is flexible and the utility amazing.

_______________
This post sponsored by the Digital SLR Store

Join the conversation! 48 Comments

  1. I use the Lowepro slingshot 200 AW

    I currently have in it my 400D, a couple of lenses and 2 strobes as well as a whole bunch of accessories like wireless triggers, flash gels, a card reader, lens clothes ect ect

    This bag is amazing, very tough, comfortable and swings around the user when desired to give you really fast access top camera and any other gear.

    It also has clips along the zip line that allow you to keep the bag open to pop your camera in and out yet still keep all your gear safe!!

    Ohh and it has a water proof elasticated plastic shield that pops from the bottom and water proofs the bag

    A highly recommended bag!

    Reply
  2. I use the Lowepro slingshot 200 AW

    I currently have in it my 400D, a couple of lenses and 2 strobes as well as a whole bunch of accessories like wireless triggers, flash gels, a card reader, lens clothes ect ect

    This bag is amazing, very tough, comfortable and swings around the user when desired to give you really fast access top camera and any other gear.

    It also has clips along the zip line that allow you to keep the bag open to pop your camera in and out yet still keep all your gear safe!!

    Ohh and it has a water proof elasticated plastic shield that pops from the bottom and water proofs the bag

    A highly recommended bag!

    Reply
  3. I am a big fan of the LowePro Slingshot 200 AW. I used it for the first time this past summer while I was shooting the Coeur d’Alene Ironman. It holds just enough gear to give me options without holding enough gear to weigh me down. It was really handy in crowded areas. The bag fits nicely on your back just like a backpack and you don’t have to put it down to root around for gear. This is a big plus for me as I have been known to put things down and forget about forget about them. Nothing like leaving a G9 on a plane or anything, but it’s nice to have my gear dummy-corded to me.

    Reply
  4. I am a big fan of the LowePro Slingshot 200 AW. I used it for the first time this past summer while I was shooting the Coeur d’Alene Ironman. It holds just enough gear to give me options without holding enough gear to weigh me down. It was really handy in crowded areas. The bag fits nicely on your back just like a backpack and you don’t have to put it down to root around for gear. This is a big plus for me as I have been known to put things down and forget about forget about them. Nothing like leaving a G9 on a plane or anything, but it’s nice to have my gear dummy-corded to me.

    Reply
  5. I love my Kata roller bag (http://www.kata-bags.com/Product.asp?Version=Photo&p_Id=311) When you slip it off of the rolling wheels, it fits perfectly in the overhead compartment on the airlines.

    Reply
  6. I love my Kata roller bag (http://www.kata-bags.com/Product.asp?Version=Photo&p_Id=311) When you slip it off of the rolling wheels, it fits perfectly in the overhead compartment on the airlines.

    Reply
  7. Hi again, since I’m an amateur and my gear resumes to a Nikon D40, a DX 18-55, a Sigma 70-300, and a small tripod, I normally use a Targus computer backpack. It as lots of pouches for extra batteries, ipod or memory cards. And while it still marks me as a tourist or a traveller, it doesn’t give away to possible thieves that I’m carrying expensive stuff in there. Particularly when I take out a sandwich.
    JPN
    Lisbon, Portugal

    Reply
  8. Hi again, since I’m an amateur and my gear resumes to a Nikon D40, a DX 18-55, a Sigma 70-300, and a small tripod, I normally use a Targus computer backpack. It as lots of pouches for extra batteries, ipod or memory cards. And while it still marks me as a tourist or a traveller, it doesn’t give away to possible thieves that I’m carrying expensive stuff in there. Particularly when I take out a sandwich.
    JPN
    Lisbon, Portugal

    Reply
  9. I used the LowePro PhotoTrekker AW for the longest time. It did a great job, but was heavy and bulky when travel time came. I picked up the ThinkTank Airport Security 2 a couple of months ago and can’t say enough good thinks about it. Practically every thing (photo related) that I put in my LowePro fits nicely and systematically in the ThinkTank. I rarely need the backpack straps, so they’re a non-issue. But the detail, room, and durability of this bag is first rate.

    Reply
  10. I used the LowePro PhotoTrekker AW for the longest time. It did a great job, but was heavy and bulky when travel time came. I picked up the ThinkTank Airport Security 2 a couple of months ago and can’t say enough good thinks about it. Practically every thing (photo related) that I put in my LowePro fits nicely and systematically in the ThinkTank. I rarely need the backpack straps, so they’re a non-issue. But the detail, room, and durability of this bag is first rate.

    Reply
  11. My favorite bag for quick access and easy use is my Lowe Pro Slingshot 200AW.

    Reply
  12. My favorite bag for quick access and easy use is my Lowe Pro Slingshot 200AW.

    Reply
  13. After buying my first DSLR last month, I had to buy my first real camera bag. It’s not a huge suitcase type bag like the one pictured in the article, though. I got the Lowepro Nova 160 AW after much searching of Tokyo camera shops. It easily holds my Nikon D80 and Nikkor 18-200mm VR & 50mm 1.8D lenses, plus the Nikon remote, a couple of lens cloths, the lens hood for the 18-200mm and tripod mount.

    What I like best about it is its built-in fold out rain cover, which I’ve already made good use of three times. This bag is small enough that I can tote it around over my shoulder along with my usual over the shoulder city bag (everyone carries a bag in Tokyo, no car to stash your stuff in).

    I used the stretch pockets on the outside to toss a Lakin bottle in as well.

    Reply
  14. I use a canon Deluxe backpack, and im already grown out of it.. I need a bigger one.. But id also like something i can have quick camera access. Thought about a lowpro SlingShot 350 AW. Maybe i should say screw quick access and just get something like the ThinkTankpro… hmmmm…

    Reply
  15. I use a canon Deluxe backpack, and im already grown out of it.. I need a bigger one.. But id also like something i can have quick camera access. Thought about a lowpro SlingShot 350 AW. Maybe i should say screw quick access and just get something like the ThinkTankpro… hmmmm…

    Reply
  16. I used various backpacks (the Tamrac Expedition series was nice), but the problem with backpacks is that you need to take them off of your back to use it.

    I have been using the Think Tank Photo Speed Freak for 18 months now and absolutely love it. It is a beltpack that also has an excellent padded shoulder strap. The shoulder strap helps to redistribute weight when the lens get heavy and also allows you to carry it as a shoulder bag. If you need to switch lenses, just swing the bag around and make the change – fast and easy. Also, as a dSLR Dad, you can quickly stow your gear when your ‘photographic subject’ starts running away.

    I can carry my Canon 40D with a Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 attached, a 50mm prime, and 70-200mm f/2.8 lens next to it. If I need to use more lenses on an expedition, it also can hold additional Think Tank modular lens pouches (which are also great to transport your lenses in while flying). Plus, it includes a Pixel Pocket Rocket that will hold up to 10 memory cards.
    dSLR Dad Tip: Flip your memory cards around once they are full and keep them that way until they have been downloaded. That way, you quickly know which ones are OK to shoot with.

    Reply
  17. I used various backpacks (the Tamrac Expedition series was nice), but the problem with backpacks is that you need to take them off of your back to use it.

    I have been using the Think Tank Photo Speed Freak for 18 months now and absolutely love it. It is a beltpack that also has an excellent padded shoulder strap. The shoulder strap helps to redistribute weight when the lens get heavy and also allows you to carry it as a shoulder bag. If you need to switch lenses, just swing the bag around and make the change – fast and easy. Also, as a dSLR Dad, you can quickly stow your gear when your ‘photographic subject’ starts running away.

    I can carry my Canon 40D with a Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 attached, a 50mm prime, and 70-200mm f/2.8 lens next to it. If I need to use more lenses on an expedition, it also can hold additional Think Tank modular lens pouches (which are also great to transport your lenses in while flying). Plus, it includes a Pixel Pocket Rocket that will hold up to 10 memory cards.
    dSLR Dad Tip: Flip your memory cards around once they are full and keep them that way until they have been downloaded. That way, you quickly know which ones are OK to shoot with.

    Reply
  18. Lowepro Slingshot is my favorite for hiking. Not only do I have access to my camera in seconds but when the bag is flipped around the front one can rest their elbows on it forming a sort of tripod.

    The bag also has clips which stop the main compartment zipper from opening past the quick access section which prevents your lenses from falling out of the bag when on the move.

    The only feature the bag is missing is a pouch to put a Camelbak.

    Reply
  19. Lowepro Slingshot is my favorite for hiking. Not only do I have access to my camera in seconds but when the bag is flipped around the front one can rest their elbows on it forming a sort of tripod.

    The bag also has clips which stop the main compartment zipper from opening past the quick access section which prevents your lenses from falling out of the bag when on the move.

    The only feature the bag is missing is a pouch to put a Camelbak.

    Reply
  20. I have a Burton “Roller Pack” for long travel, and a Timbuktu Messenger Bag for everyday use.

    Reply
  21. I have a Burton “Roller Pack” for long travel, and a Timbuktu Messenger Bag for everyday use.

    Reply
  22. I use a LowePro Slingshot 100AW as I only have a d40 with a couple of lens and need the bag to be small and light for when I’m out. It’s also great as I don’t need to take the bag off to get to the camera it just swings around and I have access to the camera.

    What it does mean is I can get rid of the neck strap as it’s as easy to just swing the bag around and grab the camera.

    I’m replacing the Nikon oem strap for http://www.amazon.com/37012-Strap-Camera-Equipment-Black/dp/B00007E816/ref=pd_cp_p_1?pf_rd_p=413862901&pf_rd_s=center-41&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B0010CMH9Y&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1YP5CQWNW3A3JJCYDJP8 so I can hand hold the camera when its out of the bag and add the strap if I need to.

    Reply
  23. I use a LowePro Slingshot 100AW as I only have a d40 with a couple of lens and need the bag to be small and light for when I’m out. It’s also great as I don’t need to take the bag off to get to the camera it just swings around and I have access to the camera.

    What it does mean is I can get rid of the neck strap as it’s as easy to just swing the bag around and grab the camera.

    I’m replacing the Nikon oem strap for http://www.amazon.com/37012-Strap-Camera-Equipment-Black/dp/B00007E816/ref=pd_cp_p_1?pf_rd_p=413862901&pf_rd_s=center-41&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B0010CMH9Y&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1YP5CQWNW3A3JJCYDJP8 so I can hand hold the camera when its out of the bag and add the strap if I need to.

    Reply
  24. I love ThinkTank stuff, although I only have one accessory lens case. My primary bag is a Tamrac CyberPack6 which is a big backpack bag that can hold all my gear. Not sure I would fly with it (I sure wouldn’t check it) but it is tough enough and versatile enough to throw in the car and go and have everything handy. The bag I REALLY love is the Tamrac Velocity 5X convertible shoulder/hip bag. Now my needs may be different from most, but I use a wheelchair and can strap the hip bag around my calves, with the bag pointing forward and access all my stuff. Not only that, but I can strap on various accessory pouches from Tamrac and, with a little coaxing, ThinkTanks’s BRILLIANT LC 75 pop-down lens bag. The LC 75 just fits my 70-200 f2.8 zoom for storage with the lens hood reversed, and then, when I have the lens mounted on my D300, I can unzip the bottom of the LC 75, adding enough length for the lens hood and use it as a holster.

    Sorry for the rant, but I reallt think ThinkTank’s stuff is amazing after discovering the LC75 and I really like Tamrac’s value. I wrote a blog post about the Velocity 5x if anyone is interested: http://www.supergimp.com/?p=142

    Reply
  25. I think a common problem is that many manufacturers make camera bags that hold gear and nothing else. For me I like to take other stuff with me such as sunglasses, a bottle of water, packed lunch, waterproof jacket etc. There seem to be a paucity of bags that hold a decent amount of gear (camera body plus 2 or 3 lenses, tripod, flash cards, filters, batteries etc.) plus all the other crap I need.

    Reply
  26. I think a common problem is that many manufacturers make camera bags that hold gear and nothing else. For me I like to take other stuff with me such as sunglasses, a bottle of water, packed lunch, waterproof jacket etc. There seem to be a paucity of bags that hold a decent amount of gear (camera body plus 2 or 3 lenses, tripod, flash cards, filters, batteries etc.) plus all the other crap I need.

    Reply
  27. I LOVE my caselogic backpack…I’m still finding new compartments for gadgets and camera stuff haha…Its my camera all in one bag.

    Reply
  28. I LOVE my caselogic backpack…I’m still finding new compartments for gadgets and camera stuff haha…Its my camera all in one bag.

    Reply
  29. So far my favorite bags are those that provide quick access, and allow me to go from backpack to shoot, to slip it away as quickly as possible so I am not walking around with a camera around my neck. For that scenario, Lowepro makes the best bags for my “grab ‘n shoot” style that I have found so far.

    Reply
  30. So far my favorite bags are those that provide quick access, and allow me to go from backpack to shoot, to slip it away as quickly as possible so I am not walking around with a camera around my neck. For that scenario, Lowepro makes the best bags for my “grab ‘n shoot” style that I have found so far.

    Reply
  31. Gotta agree with Scott. Think Tank has some excellent gear.

    I have an Airport Extreme and it holds an unbelievable amount of stuff. 3 bodies, 2 speedlights, 4 PWs, 9 lenses, 4 batteries, and more.

    I am also a big supporter of Lowepro bags. I’ve got an old PhotoTrekker II AW that is still going strong. It’s what I use when a bag on wheels are not practical such as a nature shoot or a hike. You can stuff a 400mm 2.8 lens into one of those with room to spare.

    And that ThinkTank Aquaphobia is the best rain cover I’ve come across.

    Reply
  32. Gotta agree with Scott. Think Tank has some excellent gear.

    I have an Airport Extreme and it holds an unbelievable amount of stuff. 3 bodies, 2 speedlights, 4 PWs, 9 lenses, 4 batteries, and more.

    I am also a big supporter of Lowepro bags. I’ve got an old PhotoTrekker II AW that is still going strong. It’s what I use when a bag on wheels are not practical such as a nature shoot or a hike. You can stuff a 400mm 2.8 lens into one of those with room to spare.

    And that ThinkTank Aquaphobia is the best rain cover I’ve come across.

    Reply
  33. Hey Scott, any favorite backpacks? For some methods of transportation, wheels can be cumbersome.

    Reply
  34. Hey Scott, any favorite backpacks? For some methods of transportation, wheels can be cumbersome.

    Reply
  35. I like the Lowepro SlingShot 100 to just carry a camera and few lenses. It gets the weight around on your back so you don’t feel it as much, but it is very easy to get to your camera when you want. It has a built in weather shield and the 100 makes sure you don’t carry to much “Stuff”.

    If I’m going to be carrying a laptop and camera I like the Kata KT DR-467 Digital Rucksack I’m pretty much sold on backpacks for stuff. It comes with an attachable weather shield, appears to protect stuff on the inside and with the yellow interior it seems that things are easier to find.

    Reply
  36. My favorite bag is my Crumpler 7-Million Dollar Home. It’s your standard messenger-bag form, with great padding on the bottom and many customizable (velcro) inserts.

    It has an outer pocket with a velcro flap with a mesh pocket inside, great for cards, pens, gels, etc.

    The main flap (which velcros shut + 1 large clip) also has a mesh/zipped pocket, great for cables, batteries, etc.

    In it, I carry my gripped 40D + 24-70 2.8, 50mm 1.8 under an 85mm 1.8 (both with hoods attached forward-style), a 10-22mm w hood in seperate pocket (under the grip of the camera), a 70-200mm F/4 with hood reversed, and room enough for 1 strobe.

    I also have a Crumpler 4 Million Dollar Home (which was my first bag for my XT + kit lens), which now houses my 4 other strobes (SB-80DX’s), an SC-17 cable, plus a couple of receivers and trigger.

    And lastly, my high-end, highly durable and padded (not!) light stand bag. It was initially intended to be a carrying cover for one of those camping fold-out chairs. Easily fits 3 light stands with umbrella mounts attached + 1 umbrella.

    A bit bulky, but gives me everything I need for a standard shoot.

    I am definitely looking into the ThinkTank Airport Security bag.

    Reply
  37. My favorite bag is my Crumpler 7-Million Dollar Home. It’s your standard messenger-bag form, with great padding on the bottom and many customizable (velcro) inserts.

    It has an outer pocket with a velcro flap with a mesh pocket inside, great for cards, pens, gels, etc.

    The main flap (which velcros shut + 1 large clip) also has a mesh/zipped pocket, great for cables, batteries, etc.

    In it, I carry my gripped 40D + 24-70 2.8, 50mm 1.8 under an 85mm 1.8 (both with hoods attached forward-style), a 10-22mm w hood in seperate pocket (under the grip of the camera), a 70-200mm F/4 with hood reversed, and room enough for 1 strobe.

    I also have a Crumpler 4 Million Dollar Home (which was my first bag for my XT + kit lens), which now houses my 4 other strobes (SB-80DX’s), an SC-17 cable, plus a couple of receivers and trigger.

    And lastly, my high-end, highly durable and padded (not!) light stand bag. It was initially intended to be a carrying cover for one of those camping fold-out chairs. Easily fits 3 light stands with umbrella mounts attached + 1 umbrella.

    A bit bulky, but gives me everything I need for a standard shoot.

    I am definitely looking into the ThinkTank Airport Security bag.

    Reply
  38. I have an entire closet of camera bags but Think Tank is one of my favorites. The airport international, urban disguise 40 plus airport intelligence 15 is my travel set up. I also have a crumpler six million dollar home which is good when I need to carry just a but, also the Think Tank Digital Holster 40 is nice for just carrying a larger camera with mid size lens.

    Reply
  39. I have an entire closet of camera bags but Think Tank is one of my favorites. The airport international, urban disguise 40 plus airport intelligence 15 is my travel set up. I also have a crumpler six million dollar home which is good when I need to carry just a but, also the Think Tank Digital Holster 40 is nice for just carrying a larger camera with mid size lens.

    Reply
  40. I recently got a Kata R103 rucksack. I LOVE it. It holds my D80, all my lenses (105 macro, 70-300, 50, 18-135), SB800 flash, all of my accessories, a tripod, and my 15″ MacBook Pro. It even has some room left over (guess I HAVE to buy the 10.5 fisheye now to fill in the space). It also came with a padded neck strap that can also snap in to the shoulder harness to get the camera off your neck. It also came with a 2 sided shield to protect the pack against rain and sun (one side is black, the other silver).

    It has a separate opening to get to your camera quickly without having to worry about any of the lenses coming out. There’s also lots of loops and straps to attach accessories.

    The only issue I have with it right now is that since it is pretty new, the zippers are a little tough to operate. It’s an excellent bag, and for $150 I highly recommend it.

    http://www.kata-bags.com/product.asp?p_Id=275&Version=Photo

    For very short hikes/trips where I know I don’t need much, I have a Tamrac Velocity 7. Good for the camera and 2 lenses, and a few small accessories. Not very comfortable though.

    Reply
  41. I recently got a Kata R103 rucksack. I LOVE it. It holds my D80, all my lenses (105 macro, 70-300, 50, 18-135), SB800 flash, all of my accessories, a tripod, and my 15″ MacBook Pro. It even has some room left over (guess I HAVE to buy the 10.5 fisheye now to fill in the space). It also came with a padded neck strap that can also snap in to the shoulder harness to get the camera off your neck. It also came with a 2 sided shield to protect the pack against rain and sun (one side is black, the other silver).

    It has a separate opening to get to your camera quickly without having to worry about any of the lenses coming out. There’s also lots of loops and straps to attach accessories.

    The only issue I have with it right now is that since it is pretty new, the zippers are a little tough to operate. It’s an excellent bag, and for $150 I highly recommend it.

    http://www.kata-bags.com/product.asp?p_Id=275&Version=Photo

    For very short hikes/trips where I know I don’t need much, I have a Tamrac Velocity 7. Good for the camera and 2 lenses, and a few small accessories. Not very comfortable though.

    Reply
  42. Not only will one bag not suit everyone’s needs. But, one bag won’t even suit one’s every need.

    Reply
  43. Not only will one bag not suit everyone’s needs. But, one bag won’t even suit one’s every need.

    Reply
  44. I carry two bodies, an Eos 3 and a 40d, three lenses (canon 50mm 1.8, 24-70 2.8 L and a sigma 18-200), a Macbook, two 2.5″ hard drives and some college stuff in a Lowepro fastpack 250, makes for a good day bag, although it does get crazy heavy if you’re out for too long with it.

    Reply
  45. I have to echo the positive Kata responses. I recently got the Kata DR-467 for a trip. I loved it!!! I previously used the LowePro Fastpack 250. I just posted a side-by-side comparison of the two:

    http://thatpixelgeek.com/2008/09/kata-467-vs-lowepro-fastpack-250/

    Reply
  46. I have to echo the positive Kata responses. I recently got the Kata DR-467 for a trip. I loved it!!! I previously used the LowePro Fastpack 250. I just posted a side-by-side comparison of the two:

    http://thatpixelgeek.com/2008/09/kata-467-vs-lowepro-fastpack-250/

    Reply
  47. I really like the Lowepro Stealth reporter line of shoulder bags. My D200 AW holds and more importantly protects my basic kit which includes:

    Canon Digital Rebel XTi/400D w/ EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM attached, Canon EF 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 DO IS USM, Tamron 1.4x TELECONV. f/CANON AF, Promaster Extension Tube Set 12, 20, 36mm. And either a pair of 12X25 binoculars, if I am shooting outside (flora and fauna), or my G9 if I am going to a family outing.

    There are a couple of features I like about these bags. #1 is the integrated Rain cover. #2 is the sliplock loops on the sides of the bag, which let you strap extra sliplock lens/accesory cases to the bag (as many as 6). #3 It is a plain looking bag, does not draw attention to itself. #4 has a strap on the back to secure it to a “luggage trolley”.

    it is a great bag and really expandable, but I am also looking for a bakpack for when I have to bring my Fujitsu 1510D (8.9″ wide screen UMPC). I am considering the Compu trekker AW, or the the Primus AW. My laptop is much smaller than normal, and I really don’t want to buy an extra laptop sleeve I won’t use (ie. compuprimus). I really like the concept of the Primus and Flipside packs from Lowepro. Anyone use these?

    Reply
  48. I really like the Lowepro Stealth reporter line of shoulder bags. My D200 AW holds and more importantly protects my basic kit which includes:

    Canon Digital Rebel XTi/400D w/ EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM attached, Canon EF 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 DO IS USM, Tamron 1.4x TELECONV. f/CANON AF, Promaster Extension Tube Set 12, 20, 36mm. And either a pair of 12X25 binoculars, if I am shooting outside (flora and fauna), or my G9 if I am going to a family outing.

    There are a couple of features I like about these bags. #1 is the integrated Rain cover. #2 is the sliplock loops on the sides of the bag, which let you strap extra sliplock lens/accesory cases to the bag (as many as 6). #3 It is a plain looking bag, does not draw attention to itself. #4 has a strap on the back to secure it to a “luggage trolley”.

    it is a great bag and really expandable, but I am also looking for a bakpack for when I have to bring my Fujitsu 1510D (8.9″ wide screen UMPC). I am considering the Compu trekker AW, or the the Primus AW. My laptop is much smaller than normal, and I really don’t want to buy an extra laptop sleeve I won’t use (ie. compuprimus). I really like the concept of the Primus and Flipside packs from Lowepro. Anyone use these?

    Reply

Let us know your thoughts...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Category

Opinion, Reviews

Tags