Interested in selling your photos? You might want to create a brochure, which could also double as website or other sales copy that promotes your photography. But if you’re new to sales, you might not know where to start.

Here is a worksheet you can use to start brainstorming what your promotional content should include…

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Fill out each section
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1) What is the unique selling point of your photography? This is the heart of any promotion. What is it that you do better than anyone else? What special problem do you solve? What unique approach do you use to making images that your customers want?


2) What is the offer? What do you want to give the customer? Is it prints, a web site, a slide show, an album, electronic files?


3) What is the call to action? What do you want the customer to do? Perhaps you want them to call for a free, no-obligation portrait consultation or you might want them to bring in a coupon good for one free gallery print with every one that they purchase…


4) What is your headline? This is the commercial for your offer. You need something that is short, direct, and to the point. I once ran a promotion for executive portraiture. My brochure was a simple 8.5×11″ flyer that said, “What’s Missing From This Picture?” The brochure showed a blank face and the punch line was at the bottom…”YOU!”


5) Close. This is the crucial step. Remind the customer of the call to action. Most sales don’t happen because the photographer simply failed to ask for the order.


6) Write. Put all these parts together to build your promotion.

That’s it. Good luck.

Join the conversation! 14 Comments

  1. More great info, as always. Those of us (like myself) who are interested in gelling things together a little more now have a great template to work from. TWIP continues to rock the house!

  2. More great info, as always. Those of us (like myself) who are interested in gelling things together a little more now have a great template to work from. TWIP continues to rock the house!

  3. Good list.

    Remember marketing is about telling your story. This is a good list to help you develop that story.

    Rosh

  4. Good list.

    Remember marketing is about telling your story. This is a good list to help you develop that story.

    Rosh

  5. Thank you

  6. Thank you

  7. Fantastic information, Scott! This kind of stuff is why TWiP is now my favorite photog#1raphy podcast and blog.

    I tried this technique, by the way, but I kept getting stuck at question 1…

    Aloha,

    Tim

  8. Fantastic information, Scott! This kind of stuff is why TWiP is now my favorite photog#1raphy podcast and blog.

    I tried this technique, by the way, but I kept getting stuck at question 1…

    Aloha,

    Tim

  9. Scott,

    If you don’t mind could you share the exif data on that pic? Everything would be great. But what I’m really interested in is the “big 3″ ISO, Aperture and Shutter. I’ve been working on capturing that “water in motion” look and I’m always interested in what others have done. But I love to know what Pro’s do to help me become a better photographer. Thanks and keep up the great podcast!

  10. Scott,

    If you don’t mind could you share the exif data on that pic? Everything would be great. But what I’m really interested in is the “big 3″ ISO, Aperture and Shutter. I’ve been working on capturing that “water in motion” look and I’m always interested in what others have done. But I love to know what Pro’s do to help me become a better photographer. Thanks and keep up the great podcast!

  11. Dwayne I could share that but it would be totally irrelevant, and here’s why. The shutter speed, aperture and ISO for THAT day given the lighting conditions THAT day and at the time I took the picture on THAT day, were different 30 minutes before and after. You couldn’t go to that same location, use the very same shutter speed, aperture and ISO and expect a good photo on any OTHER day. Better to learn the concept. Slow shutter speed combined with small aperture provide the typical look you see here. Hope that helps.

  12. Dwayne I could share that but it would be totally irrelevant, and here’s why. The shutter speed, aperture and ISO for THAT day given the lighting conditions THAT day and at the time I took the picture on THAT day, were different 30 minutes before and after. You couldn’t go to that same location, use the very same shutter speed, aperture and ISO and expect a good photo on any OTHER day. Better to learn the concept. Slow shutter speed combined with small aperture provide the typical look you see here. Hope that helps.

  13. […] TWIP » How to Sell Your Photography – Sales Copy – TWIP – […]

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