June 30, 2008

Online Email Resize

I came upon an interesting web site today that I hadn’t seen in years. It’s called Resize2mail.com. What this site does is simple and yet amazing. It lets you upload, resize, rotate and save an image in the appropriate size for email. You can even crop the image! Once you are done, you right click with your mouse or click their download button and your image is ready to go. You can attach it to your email program, click send, and your relatives will stop screaming at you because you sent them a file that was too large for their mailbox.

Resize2mail is free of charge. I tested it with a dozen images and found it worked perfectly. The site is advertising supported and one that I can highly praise as valuable for anyone who just wants to resize a photo for email.
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This post sponsored by the Digital SLR Store

Join the conversation! 10 Comments

  1. For Mac users, Mail.app allows you to resize the images you attached isn’t it? Another alternative is to use Skitch, which you can drag into it, do the resizing, before dragging it into your email…

  2. Or, if you’re a Windows user, you can select your images on your hard drive, click “Email this file” on the sidebar and Windows asks you if you would like the images resized for email. Click resize, and Presto Chango! and no “screaming relatives.” :)

  3. Or, if you’re a Windows user, you can select your images on your hard drive, click “Email this file” on the sidebar and Windows asks you if you would like the images resized for email. Click resize, and Presto Chango! and no “screaming relatives.” :)

  4. My relatives learn to like 12MB .CR2 files! Hahaha! no seriously, I made an export preset in Lightroom for a 80% quality JPEG, longest edge to 1000px in 72dpi with minimal embedded metadata which I then email. It is nice and close to my workflow and seems more intuititve than uploading to a website and editing and downloading again and then sending.

  5. My relatives learn to like 12MB .CR2 files! Hahaha! no seriously, I made an export preset in Lightroom for a 80% quality JPEG, longest edge to 1000px in 72dpi with minimal embedded metadata which I then email. It is nice and close to my workflow and seems more intuititve than uploading to a website and editing and downloading again and then sending.

  6. This post begs the question of what is the “right” size to send out photos by email.

    Personally, I wish everyone would make their shots available in full resolution so I can more easily make adjustments and have the option to make prints (copyright tends to not be an issue when it is just friends are snapping each other on a night out).

    I also know that the average recipient of email photos will only want to glance at it on a screen or upload it to Facebook.

    Typically I send at 1024×768 and include an offer to provide high res files if anyone wants them. No one ever takes me up on my offer. :-)

    Thoughts?

  7. This post begs the question of what is the “right” size to send out photos by email.

    Personally, I wish everyone would make their shots available in full resolution so I can more easily make adjustments and have the option to make prints (copyright tends to not be an issue when it is just friends are snapping each other on a night out).

    I also know that the average recipient of email photos will only want to glance at it on a screen or upload it to Facebook.

    Typically I send at 1024×768 and include an offer to provide high res files if anyone wants them. No one ever takes me up on my offer. :-)

    Thoughts?

  8. Why would I want to upload a large file to make it smaller? Isn’t the idea of resizing to make the file smaller to reduce upload time? Am I missing something?

  9. Typically I go around 700-900 pixels on the long side for emails since there are a still a few people with only 800×600 resolution on their monitors. I agree with Yves, if you have the software, just create an action to convert your images to email size. Plus if you are doing it in an action, you can ad a watermark to your website on it.

  10. Typically I go around 700-900 pixels on the long side for emails since there are a still a few people with only 800×600 resolution on their monitors. I agree with Yves, if you have the software, just create an action to convert your images to email size. Plus if you are doing it in an action, you can ad a watermark to your website on it.

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