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Adobe has released an update to the Adobe Digital Negative specification (DNG), a publicly available archival format for the raw files generated by digital cameras.

This update provides new and expanded specifications that provide the digital imaging industry with increased flexibility and improved workflow for their raw images. A DNG Codec for Windows Vista has also been released on Adobe Labs, allowing photographers utilizing the Windows Vista platform to work with raw files in a more seamless manner.

This update addresses several industry requirements in the DNG format, including formalization of the concept of a “camera profile” and allowance for multiple camera profiles to be embedded in a single DNG file, producing the desired image results in a streamlined and efficient workflow. Additional metadata tags have been defined for the DNG format, including a field to indicate the integrity of the raw data within the file, providing a valuable tool to validate the safety of photographers’
image data. The DNG SDK has also been updated to reflect the changes to the specification.

Availability

Adobe DNG Converter is available as a free download at www.adobe.com/dng. The DNG Codec for Windows Vista is only compatible with Windows Vista 32-bit editions and is available as a free download at www.labs.adobe.com.

Join the conversation! 8 Comments

  1. what is the benefit of DNG over RAW? sounds like it’s another proprietary format by Adobe instead of camera manufacturer. what’s the benefit of that?

  2. what is the benefit of DNG over RAW? sounds like it’s another proprietary format by Adobe instead of camera manufacturer. what’s the benefit of that?

  3. Has the DNG converter for Mac been updated? I looked at the readme for the DNG Converter download (http://www.adobe.com/special/photoshop/camera_raw/DNG_4.4.1_Converter_ReadMe.pdf), and it lists April 4 as the change date.

    Personally hoping for a fix to the all-timestamps-off-by-9-hours bug between the DNG converter and Aperture.

    As for why DNG: for me, it is because CRW, my camera’s native format, doesn’t allow encapsulation of geocoding tags (latitude, longitude). So, I have this CRW-to-DNG step in my import process so that I can eventually geocode the master files and then tell Aperture to re-read the EXIF from the masters. So, yeah, another proprietary RAW format, except that it’s by a company selling software rather than one selling hardware … and except that it is a better format than some of the hardware vendors’ formats.

  4. Has the DNG converter for Mac been updated? I looked at the readme for the DNG Converter download (http://www.adobe.com/special/photoshop/camera_raw/DNG_4.4.1_Converter_ReadMe.pdf), and it lists April 4 as the change date.

    Personally hoping for a fix to the all-timestamps-off-by-9-hours bug between the DNG converter and Aperture.

    As for why DNG: for me, it is because CRW, my camera’s native format, doesn’t allow encapsulation of geocoding tags (latitude, longitude). So, I have this CRW-to-DNG step in my import process so that I can eventually geocode the master files and then tell Aperture to re-read the EXIF from the masters. So, yeah, another proprietary RAW format, except that it’s by a company selling software rather than one selling hardware … and except that it is a better format than some of the hardware vendors’ formats.

  5. Actually, I think the whole idea is that DNG is NOT proprietary. It may have been created by Adobe, but the code is made freely available under a free-use provision. This ensures that the DNG format can be read by other software, and that no parts are “hidden”. This is intended to ensure that DNG files can be read forever, essentially, even if Canon/Nikon/Minolta/Sony go the way of the dinosaur.

    By the way, they are somewhat smaller than your average CRW file as well, but as the TWIP’s keep saying “disk space is cheap”. I suppose, but it’s not yet free.

    Bob.

  6. Actually, I think the whole idea is that DNG is NOT proprietary. It may have been created by Adobe, but the code is made freely available under a free-use provision. This ensures that the DNG format can be read by other software, and that no parts are “hidden”. This is intended to ensure that DNG files can be read forever, essentially, even if Canon/Nikon/Minolta/Sony go the way of the dinosaur.

    By the way, they are somewhat smaller than your average CRW file as well, but as the TWIP’s keep saying “disk space is cheap”. I suppose, but it’s not yet free.

    Bob.

  7. Could TWIP address some questions about DNG in the future? Specifically, should I start converting my RAW files to DNG now or wait to let the format settle down a bit more? What are the cons associated with converting from my native RAW format to this open standard?

    Seems like a great idea (even though I’m not fond of Adobe) but I’m just looking for a little more clarification.

  8. Could TWIP address some questions about DNG in the future? Specifically, should I start converting my RAW files to DNG now or wait to let the format settle down a bit more? What are the cons associated with converting from my native RAW format to this open standard?

    Seems like a great idea (even though I’m not fond of Adobe) but I’m just looking for a little more clarification.

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